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Is Avocado Good For Gestational Diabetes

10 Benefits Of Eating Avocado During Pregnancy

10 Benefits Of Eating Avocado During Pregnancy

10 Benefits of Eating Avocado during Pregnancy Avocados taste great on everything from chips to salad, but theres more than just taste to these little green fruits. Packed full of healthy fats, avocados have been shown to have a powerful impact on healthan impact that translates into lots of good stuff for your baby! So, without further ado, here are 10 reasons to include avocado in your diet during pregnancy. There are a lot of ways to get more calories into your diet, but sugar, carbs, and saturated fats can actually cause you to gain more weight than you need to. Enter in the heart healthy fats found in avocados. They make it easy to up your fat intake without all the bad stuff. Just lots of nutrients. Avocados contain twice as much potassium as bananas, and a hearty helping of your recommended daily intake of vitamin K, folate, vitamin C, vitamin B5, vitamin B6, and vitamin E. They also contain a small amount of magnesium, manganese, copper, iron, zinc, phosphorus, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, and vitamin B3. Youre also going to find 2 grams of protein and 7 grams of fiber in just one serving of avocado! #3 Can Help you Absorb Nutrients from Other Foods As if the jam-packed nutrients found in avocados wasnt already an amazing benefit . . . they also help your body to better absorb nutrients found in other foods, such as the antioxidant carotenoids found in carrots, sweet potatoes, and leafy greens. #4 May Reduce the Risk of Excessive Weight Gain Because theyre so high in fiber, avocados may actually help reduce the chances of excessive weight gain in pregnancy. In fact, some studies have linked them to weight loss in those that are not pregnant. Oh, and those fiber grams? Twenty-five percent of them happen to be soluble, which feeds friendly bacteria to the g Continue reading >>

The Gestational Diabetes Menu

The Gestational Diabetes Menu

Planning your gestational diabetes menu can be challenging. It can be less of a chore when you follow these simple guidelines. Learn to look at food with a different perspective. See the foods according to these categories. Protein Red meat, for example: Pork. Beef. Mutton. Poultry, for example: Chicken. Turkey. Duck. Legumes, like: Lentils. Beans, for example: Soya beans. Kidney beans. Butter beans. Bake beans. Eggs. Cheese. Nuts. Carbohydrates Starch. Rice. Grains. Cereals. Bread. Pasta. Spaghetti. Macaroni. Noodles. Vegetables. Potatoes. Corn. Vegetables for example: Green beans. Sweet potato. Lettuce. Fruit, for example: Peaches. Oranges. Apples. Kiwi. Plums. Dairy. Milk. Fat Poultry skins. Avocado. Nuts. Dairy: Milk. Butter. Cheese. Fiber All vegetables. All fruit. Grains. Nuts. It is impossible to show you every food available, get the information from the labels. Plan your meals for the gestational diabetes menu according to the categories above. You need the correct balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat. When planning your gestational diabetes menu, split the carbohydrates as starch, vegetables and fruit and dairy. Count the value of the food according to the ingredient that is the most common. For example, nuts contain fat, protein and fiber, but its main source is protein. Therefore, if you need some protein for a meal, then nuts will be a good choice. However, if you need to add some fat, then nuts would be the wrong choice. Avocados are a fruit, but count it as a fat on your gestational diabetes menu. Always have a protein when you eat carbohydrates. The required dietary fat will come naturally it is thus easy to have too much. Therefore, limit the amount of fat in your diet. Recommended Meal Sizes for the Gestational Diabetes Menu Breakfast. 2 Servings Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating Guidelines For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Healthy Eating Guidelines For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Gestational diabetes (GDM) can happen during pregnancy as hormone levels in your body change. These changes affect how your body manages glucose (sugar). GDM makes it harder for your body to control your blood glucose and increases your risk for type 2 diabetes and other health conditions later in life. Eating a healthy, well balanced diet, managing your weight gain and being physically active can help control your blood glucose and give you and your baby the nutrients you need for a healthy pregnancy. Ask your health care provider to refer you to a diabetes clinic in your community. The dietitian and rest of the health care team will help you to plan a healthy diet that works for you and to have a healthy pregnancy. The information in this handout can help you to get started. Steps You Can Take Eat regular, balanced meals and snacks. Enjoy three meals and three snacks spaced evenly throughout the day. Include at least three food groups in a meal and two food groups for a snack. Eat one of your snacks at bedtime. A balanced diet contains foods with carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats. Carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels. Read on to learn which carbohydrates are the healthiest choices for you. Carbohydrate is found in grain products, fruit and fruit juice, some vegetables, milk and alternatives, dried beans, peas and lentils, and foods such as cakes, cookies, squares, candy and sugary drinks. Choose fibre-rich sources of carbohydrates like whole grain breads and cereals, and dried beans, peas and lentils. Fibre slows carbohydrate absorption into your blood. Choose vegetables and fruit rather than juice. Choose low glycemic index (GI) foods more often. Low GI foods raise blood glucose at a slower rate than high GI foods. See Additional Resources Continue reading >>

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

If you have diabetes, you know that food plays a big role in controlling your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrate--containing foods, which include sugar, sweets, sugary drinks, grains, starchy vegetables, fruits and some dairy, are converted to sugar during the digestion process and therefore contribute to raising your blood sugar levels after eating. A high--carb intake will result in high blood sugar levels. Video of the Day The nutrition facts for avocado depend on its size. For example, a whole California avocado provides about 227 calories, 11.8 grams of carbohydrates and 9.2 grams of fiber, while a Florida avocado is larger and contains 365 calories, 23.8 grams of carbohydrates and 17.0 grams of fiber. With diabetes, carbohydrates elevate your blood sugar levels, but only the starch and sugar part of the total carbohydrates, not the fiber. Available Carbohydrate and Diabetes To better estimate the effect of avocado on your blood sugar levels, you can calculate their available carbohydrate content by subtracting fiber from the total carbs. In the case of a California avocado, you get 2.6 grams of available carbohydrates, while a Florida avocado contains 6.8 grams of available carbohydates because of its larger size. Usually, diabetics are recommended to limit their carb intake to 45 grams to 60 grams per meal. Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado. Although avocado itself is not likely to hinder your glycemic control, it is often served with high-carb foods such as tortillas, nacho chips and taco shells. If your meal includes foods that have a high carbohydrate content, your blood sugar is likely to rise, so count your carbs to ensure you do not eat more carbo Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Avocado Avocado is high in monounsaturated fats, which are generally considered among the healthiest of fats. Researchers have found that a diet high in monounsaturated fats and low in low–quality carbs may improve insulin sensitivity. Monounsaturated fats also improve heart health — an especially important benefit for diabetics, who are at an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. Add a few thin slices of avocado to your sandwiches in place of mayonnaise, or mash a ripe avocado with cilantro, lime juice, and diced tomato for a delicious guacamole dip. Now that you know which foods can help control blood sugars, find out which ones can lead to terrible diabetes complications. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

For a balanced diet, you need to eat a variety of healthy foods. Reading food labels can help you make healthy choices when you shop. If you are a vegetarian or on a special diet, talk with your health care provider to make sure you're getting a balanced diet. In general, you should eat: Plenty of whole fruits and vegetables Moderate amounts of lean proteins and healthy fats Moderate amounts of whole grains, such as bread, cereal, pasta, and rice, plus starchy vegetables, such as corn and peas Fewer foods that have a lot of sugar, such as soft drinks, fruit juices, and pastries You should eat three small- to moderate-sized meals and one or more snacks each day. Do not skip meals and snacks. Keep the amount and types of food (carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) the same from day to day. This can help you keep your blood sugar stable. CARBOHYDRATES Less than half the calories you eat should come from carbohydrates. Most carbohydrates are found in starchy or sugary foods. They include bread, rice, pasta, cereal, potatoes, peas, corn, fruit, fruit juice, milk, yogurt, cookies, candy, soda, and other sweets. High-fiber, whole-grain carbohydrates are healthy choices. Vegetables are good for your health and your blood sugar. Enjoy lots of them. Carbohydrates in food are measured in grams. You can learn to count the amount of carbohydrates in the foods that you eat. GRAINS, BEANS, AND STARCHY VEGETABLES Eat 6 or more servings a day. One serving equals: 1 slice bread 1 ounce (28 grams) ready-to-eat cereal 1/2 cup (105 grams) cooked rice or pasta 1 English muffin Choose foods loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and healthy carbohydrates. They include: Whole-grain breads and crackers Whole grain cereals Whole grains, such as barley or oats Beans Brown or wild rice Whole-wheat pa Continue reading >>

Eating Avocados During Pregnancy Study Finds Huge Benefits

Eating Avocados During Pregnancy Study Finds Huge Benefits

Eating Avocados During Pregnancy Study Finds Huge Benefits By Fiona Peacock in Pregnancy . Updated: July 8, 2016 Sometimes nature can be a little too perfect. Mother nature seems to have made sure some foods look like the body part theyre good for. For example, if youre looking to improve brain function, walnuts are the way to go. If its a decent erection you want, experts recommend eating bananas. So its perhaps no surprise that pregnant women are being advised to eat more of that oh-so pregnant fruitavocado. Avocado is a superfood that shows no sign of letting up. In fact, the known benefits of eating this fruit just keep racking up. Avocados are full of good fats, high in dietary fibre and a great source of folate. Folate is especially important during early pregnancy, because it can reduce the risk of birth defects. You can find out more about folate rich foods here . Study Recommends Eating Avocados During Pregnancy A new study, published in the journal Nutrients , looked at the role of avocados in the diets of pregnant and lactating women. Avocados are unique among fruits and vegetables in that, by weight, they contain much higher amounts of the key nutrients folate and potassium, which are normally under-consumed in maternal diets. Avocados also contain higher amounts of several non-essential compounds, such as fiber, mono-unsaturated fats, and lipid-soluble antioxidants, which have all been linked to improvements in maternal health, birth outcomes and/or breast milk quality. Currently, US dietary advice applies only to those aged two years and above. However, it is known that maternal diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding can have a huge impact on the health of both mother and baby. Official dietary advice for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers will be issued Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

The humble avocado, shunned for years during the fat-free diet craze of the 1990s, may have finally hit its stride. No longer just for guacamole, this nutritious fruit is popping up as a healthy addition to various diet plans. But can people with diabetes eat this food? It turns out that avocados are not only safe for people with diabetes, but they may be downright beneficial. Research shows that avocados offer many ways to help people manage their diabetes and improve their overall well-being. Contents of this article: Diet and diabetes A healthy diet is critical for people with diabetes. The foods that they eat each day can have a considerable impact on how they feel and how well their diabetes is controlled. In general, people with diabetes should eat foods that help control blood sugar levels and that offer health benefits such lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. This is one of the best ways to keep diabetes under control, avoid complications, and lead the healthiest life possible. Avocados are an excellent choice for people with diabetes because they offer all these benefits - and possibly more. How do avocados affect blood sugar levels? Blood sugar control is critical for people who have diabetes. A physician or dietitian may advise patients to choose foods that are lower in carbohydrates and sugar. They may also recommend foods that help control blood sugar spikes. An avocado meets both of these requirements. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an average medium avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates. For comparison, an apple has 25 grams of carbohydrates and a banana has 27. A 1-ounce serving, or about one-fifth of an avocado, contains only 3 grams of carbohydrates and less than 1 gram of sugar. With so few carbohydrates, people Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

10 Benefits Of Eating Avocado During Pregnancy

10 Benefits Of Eating Avocado During Pregnancy

You are here: Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Tips 10 Benefits of Eating Avocado during Pregnancy 10 Benefits of Eating Avocado during Pregnancy Posted by Admin on July 16th, 2015 09:12 AM Avocados taste fantastic on everything from chips to salad, however theres even more compared to just preference to these little environment-friendly fruits. Loaded complete of healthy fats, avocados have actually been shown to have an effective effect on wellness an influence that equates right into great deals of great things for your baby! So, without additional trouble, right here are 10 reasons to consist of avocado in your diet plan during pregnancy. There are a bunch of ways to obtain even more calories right into your diet regimen, but sugar, carbs, as well as saturated fats could really trigger you to get more weight compared to you should. Enter in the heart healthy and balanced fats located in avocados. They make it simple to up your fat intake without all the bad stuff. Merely lots of nutrients. Avocados include twice as significantly potassium as bananas, and also a hearty assisting of your advised daily consumption of vitamin K, folate, vitamin C, vitamin B5, vitamin B6, as well as vitamin E. They additionally include a tiny amount of magnesium, manganese, copper, iron, zinc, phosphorus, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, as well as vitamin B3. Youre additionally likelying to find 2 grams of protein as well as 7 grams of fiber in merely one serving of avocado! # 3 Can Help you Absorb Nutrients from Other Foods As if the full nutrients discovered in avocados wasnt already a fantastic perk they likewise assist your physical body to a lot better absorb nutrients located in other foods, such as the antioxidant carotenoids discovered in carrots, delightful potatoes Continue reading >>

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks: more clinic appointments, more blood tests, taking medications, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be, “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. This may come as a surprise, but you don’t have to go on a special diet when have gestational diabetes. Depending on your current diet, you may have to eat less of some foods and more of others. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Nowadays, you may need to make some changes to your diet, but it’s not a case of cutting things out. Rather, you’ll need to follow the same healthy, balanced diet that’s recommended to everyone. The main aim for managing gestational diabetes is ensuring that your blood glucose levels are under control, so your healthcare team will discuss targets that are right for you. Achieving the targets will increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and your food choices play a vital role in this. It is important to enjoy your meals while making changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable. This will help control your blood glucose levels, and help prevent excessive weight gain during your pregnancy. All carbohydrates will ha Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

As a person with diabetes, I love avocados. That beautiful, alligator-skinned, green-egg shaped thing. Sorry, it doesn’t come with ham. (Oh come on, that was funny!) So, why do I love avocados, and why are they so good for people with diabetes? First of all, it’s low-carb and high in fat, and the fat is all good for you (because it’s mostly a healthy fat). The avocado is also yummy, like butter, except instead of killing you, it’s saving you. I know, I know, big claims, but why? Here are some of the nutritional wonders of the average California avocado: about 320 calories 17 grams carbs 13 grams of fiber 30 grams of fat –> 4 grams of saturated fat (the least healthy kind) –> 20 grams monounsaturated fat (the most healthy kind) –> 4 grams of polyunsaturated fat (a pretty healthy kind) Numerous vitamins and minerals, including the ever so important electrolytes potassium and magnesium. In fact, an avocado usually has 3 times more potassium than a banana does. Now let’s break that down. 320 calories. That’s pretty high, right? So what! With everything you get in this wonder fruit, it’s worth it. Yes, it’s a fruit, not a vegetable. The avocado is also known as an “alligator pear.” 17 grams of carbs and 13 grams of fiber. As people with diabetes, you know that’s a really odd ratio, and it seems that you may not even need to take any insulin when you eat one of these things, because we always substract the fiber from the carbohydrates to calculate our insulin needs. Personally, I don’t need any insulin for an avocado, and that’s part of why I love them. 30 grams of fat. That’s high too, right? So what! The simple myth of “eating fat makes you fat” simply isn’t accurate. Fat doesn’t make you fat. You get 20 grams of monounsaturated fat Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

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