diabetestalk.net

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes

Mushrooms Good For Diabetics: Expert

Mushrooms Good For Diabetics: Expert

IANS , Kolkata | Updated: February 02, 2015 16:02 IST Mushrooms are good for diabetics since they contain little or no sugar, says an expert. "Cultivated and wild species of mushrooms are consumed because of their nutritional value. They are rich in essential nutritional constituents and are good for people with diabetes as they have little or no sugar," said T.N. Lakhanpal from the department of bioscience at Himachal Pradesh University. Lakhanpal was among the delegates at the 100th Indian Science Congress, which ended here Sunday. According to the scientist, mushrooms, being almost fat-free, benefit the obese too. On the emerging importance of mushroom biology, Lakhanpal said: "The potential of mushrooms as neutraceuticals has emerged as an important aspect of mushroom biology in the last 20 years". "Also, all the mushrooms investigated so far have been found to have curative properties against cancer, HIV and other dreaded diseases," he said. Besides medicinal benefits, mushroom cultivation provides economic benefits, he said. Comments "Mushroom cultivation is a cottage and commercial industry and is finding favour among the rural people." Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Food & Nutrition

Food & Nutrition

You can make a huge difference to your health by making a few simple changes to your everyday eating. In short: Base your meals around the healthy plate ( downloadable from here) Drink plenty of water and avoid drinking fruit juice and other sweet drinks. Eat breakfast, lunch and dinner every day. Eat some carbohydrate food at each meal, but try to keep your portion size of the carbohydrate food at a quarter of your plate. Choose food low in sugar, saturated fat and calories or kilojoules and avoid processed food where possible. Healthy food choices are the foundation of diabetes management, and losing some weight (if needed) can help improve diabetes management. Three meals a day at regular times are helpful. If the time between lunch and dinner is longer than 4-5 hours then a healthy afternoon tea snack may be important – such as a handful of nuts or a piece of fruit. Carbohydrate foods (starches and sugars) have the most direct effect on blood glucose levels. High sugar foods are discouraged but small amounts of sugar in foods are acceptable. Starchy foods (breakfast cereals, bread, rice, pasta, starchy vegetables like potato etc.) break down to glucose when digested. Have some but not too much of these foods at each meal. Choose wholegrain and less processed varieties of these foods where possible. The type of fat in your meal is also important. Saturated fat is discouraged as it is linked with heart disease. Healthier fats are found in olive and canola oils, margarines made from these, avocado and nuts. Generous amounts of vegetables and some fruit are all part of a diabetes friendly meal pattern. High intakes of salt are linked with high blood pressure. Good control of blood pressure is important for people with diabetes so take care with salt. Use some when you Continue reading >>

12 Fabulous Foods To Beat Diabetes

12 Fabulous Foods To Beat Diabetes

Eating for Type 2 Diabetes En español l For years, experts recommended a low-fat diet, but new research finds that low-carb diets are better at reducing high blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association encourages people to work with a nutrition professional on a personalized diet plan. These tasty foods will enhance any plan. Berries Blueberries, blackberries, strawberries and their richly colored cousins are all high in fiber and brimming with vitamins and antioxidants. They don't have much in the way of carbs, so they're low on the glycemic index (GI). Still, they contain a lot of sugar, so limit your serving size. Cheese Cheese is a satisfying food. It has practically no carbs, which means it won't significantly influence blood sugar levels, and because it's high in protein, a little will go a long way in controlling hunger pangs. Continue reading >>

Spotlight On... Diabetic Diets

Spotlight On... Diabetic Diets

A healthy, balanced diet is key to keeping your blood sugar levels in check and your diabetes under control... What is diabetes? Diabetes is a lifelong condition caused by a failure of the blood sugar regulation mechanism in the body. This is controlled by a hormone called insulin. Diabetes results when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or cells of the body become resistant to insulin so blood sugar levels are not controlled as they should be. Without the proper function of insulin, sugar cannot enter muscle or fat cells, causing serious secondary complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, neuropathy and other complications. Type 1 diabetes Insulin dependent, less common and usually develops before the age of 30. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas stops producing insulin. The exact cause is unknown but some believe that it is an autoimmune response in which the body attacks its own pancreatic cells. People with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin for life. Type 2 diabetes Non-insulin dependent, used to be most common in later life but is becoming increasingly more prevalent in younger generation largely due to an increase in obesity. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still produces insulin, but either it is not producing enough or the body does not respond to it properly. The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity. In many cases, Type 2 diabetes can be avoided through eating a healthy, balanced diet and taking regular exercise and often can be controlled in the same way if diagnosed. However, some cases will require medication and your doctor should be the one to determine whether this is necessary. Recent research has reported interesting evidence to support the reversal of type 2 diabetes. Research funded by Diabetes UK and per Continue reading >>

Avocados & Carbohydrates

Avocados & Carbohydrates

What are Carbs? Carbohydrates are one of three macronutrients (protein and fat are the other two) and are classified as simple or complex. Simple carbohydrates include sugars like glucose, fructose (fruit sugar) and sucrose (table sugar). Complex carbohydrates include starches and fiber. The primary function of carbohydrates (except fiber) is to provide energy for the body, especially the brain and the nervous system. An enzyme called amylase helps break down carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar), which is used for energy by the body. Finding the right amount of carbohydrates can vary by individual needs, so working with a physician or registered dietitian is helpful. Foods that are high in processed, refined simple sugars provide calories, but very little nutrition. There are 8g Total Carbs in 1 Serving of Avocado Carbohydrates: Meeting Daily Needs According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), most people should get between 40% and 60% of total calories from carbohydrates, preferably from complex carbohydrates (starches) and natural sugars. Complex carbohydrates provide calories, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Foods that are high in processed, refined simple sugars provide calories, but very little nutrition. It is wise to limit these sugars. For information about how many servings are recommended, see the article on the food guide plate. AVOCADO + FIBER Fiber is a complex carbohydrate. Dietary fiber - the kind you eat, has two forms: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber attracts water to slow digestion, while insoluble fiber helps to speed the passage of foods through the stomach and intestines. Dietary fiber can be helpful in controlling weight because it helps make you feel full faster. To increase your consumption of complex carbohydrates and healthy nut Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Many people think that diabetics have to avoid many foods, including different fruits. However, there are super healthy fruits for diabetics because they provide important minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fiber. Some low-carb fruits are also good for diabetics. People who have this disease should care about the ratings of the glycemic index to measure the carbohydrates which are converted to the blood Gl. Scientifically, the suitable glycemic index for diabetics is below 50. The following are the top 19 good fruits for diabetics and high blood pressure. Let’s check out these fruits to control your blood sugar and cure diabetes naturally. 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure Revealed! 1. Apples (Gl: 38, Gl/a fresh apple: 150g:7) Apples are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants and fiber. Apple pulp and peel contain pectin which helps to detoxify your body and remove harmful waste from the body. Pectin also is high in galacturonic acid that can help diabetics lower their insulin requirements up to 30%. You can eat a fresh apple or toss some slices of apples into a cup of tea and enjoy your breakfast. A medium apple contains about 12 g of carbohydrates and 54 calories. You can eat fresh apples without peeling them because apple peel includes a good source of anti-oxidants that good for digestion. Furthermore, apples are available throughout any seasons of the year. For containing a large amount of the soluble fiber, apples are fruit good for diabetics. Apples help diabetes patients reduce cholesterol, normalize their blood sugar level and improve their bowel function. Apple is also good at eliminating inflammation in the body and help diabetics beat infections effectively. Besides, apple is rich in anti-oxidants that help boost immunity. Apple also h Continue reading >>

Eating Good Fats On A Diabetic Diet

Eating Good Fats On A Diabetic Diet

One of the biggest issues and misconceptions your clients with diabetes may raise is that they need to eat special diabetic foods, or eliminate certain foods and nutrients from the dietespecially dietary fatsin order to lose weight, improve health and manage blood sugar. Yet, simply following a healthy diet and eating pattern, like what is recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA), can be appropriate for this population. As health professionals, its important you help your clients understand the beneficial role good fats can play within a diabetes diet. Among several potential benefits, good fats can help enhance nutrient absorption, and do not raise LDL cholesterol levels. Fats to limit are predominantly found in: Processed meats or other cuts with higher amounts of saturated fat Baked goods and foods that contain partially hydrogenated oils To help your clients build a healthy diabetes-friendly meal plan, try following the recommendations from the DGA. The DGA recommends replacing saturated andtransfats with small amounts of oilsfats with a high percentage of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatswhere possible and staying within calorie needs, rather than adding oil to the diet.vOils are naturally present in foods such as avocados, olives, nuts and seafood.vi For instance, substituting a food containing mostly saturated fat on a sandwich with one serving of sliced avocado (1/3 avocado) can help an individual achieve the major dietary goal of reducing the amount of saturated fat in their diet.Avocados are cholesterol and sodium free and more than 75 percent of the fruits fat content is unsaturated, making them a great choice to include as part of a balanced meal or snack. In fact, the Hass Avocado Board is supporting research to improve understandin Continue reading >>

Nearly Half Of American Adults Are Pre-diabetic Or Diabetic

Nearly Half Of American Adults Are Pre-diabetic Or Diabetic

These foods supply important nutrients that are often low in diabetics and pre-diabetics, and linked to conditions like stroke, heart disease, hypertension, gastrointestinal ailments and obesity About half of all American adults are either pre-diabetic or diabetic. Even one-third of normal-weight adults may also be pre-diabetic without knowing it Diabetes is rooted in insulin resistance and malfunctioning leptin signaling, caused by chronically elevated insulin and leptin levels. This is why treating type 2 diabetes with insulin does not resolve the problem Dietary recommendations for diabetics include a diet high in healthy fats, moderate protein and low in net carbs. Nine specific superfoods for diabetics are also reviewed By Dr. Mercola As of 2012, up to 14 percent of the American population had type 2 diabetes, and as much as 38 percent were pre-diabetic. This suggests about HALF of all American adults are either pre-diabetic or diabetic.1,2 At least 20 percent of the population in every U.S. state is also obese3 — a condition that severely predisposes you to diabetes. That said, being skinny is not a blanket assurance of health. Recent research suggests one-third of normal-weight adults may also be pre-diabetic without knowing it.4 Children are also getting fatter and unhealthier. According to recent research, 7 million children in the U.S. have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and close to one-third of these kids also have either pre-diabetes or diabetes.5 Great Britain has also seen a rapid rise in these conditions. In 2003, 11.6 percent of people in Great Britain were diagnosed with pre-diabetes. That number had tripled by 2011, reaching over 35 percent. As noted by BBC News,6 "The world is facing an 'unrelenting march' of diabetes that now affects ne Continue reading >>

The Gestational Diabetes Menu

The Gestational Diabetes Menu

Planning your gestational diabetes menu can be challenging. It can be less of a chore when you follow these simple guidelines. Learn to look at food with a different perspective. See the foods according to these categories. Protein Red meat, for example: Pork. Beef. Mutton. Poultry, for example: Chicken. Turkey. Duck. Legumes, like: Lentils. Beans, for example: Soya beans. Kidney beans. Butter beans. Bake beans. Eggs. Cheese. Nuts. Carbohydrates Starch. Rice. Grains. Cereals. Bread. Pasta. Spaghetti. Macaroni. Noodles. Vegetables. Potatoes. Corn. Vegetables for example: Green beans. Sweet potato. Lettuce. Fruit, for example: Peaches. Oranges. Apples. Kiwi. Plums. Dairy. Milk. Fat Poultry skins. Avocado. Nuts. Dairy: Milk. Butter. Cheese. Fiber All vegetables. All fruit. Grains. Nuts. It is impossible to show you every food available, get the information from the labels. Plan your meals for the gestational diabetes menu according to the categories above. You need the correct balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat. When planning your gestational diabetes menu, split the carbohydrates as starch, vegetables and fruit and dairy. Count the value of the food according to the ingredient that is the most common. For example, nuts contain fat, protein and fiber, but its main source is protein. Therefore, if you need some protein for a meal, then nuts will be a good choice. However, if you need to add some fat, then nuts would be the wrong choice. Avocados are a fruit, but count it as a fat on your gestational diabetes menu. Always have a protein when you eat carbohydrates. The required dietary fat will come naturally it is thus easy to have too much. Therefore, limit the amount of fat in your diet. Recommended Meal Sizes for the Gestational Diabetes Menu Breakfast. 2 Servings Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

The humble avocado, shunned for years during the fat-free diet craze of the 1990s, may have finally hit its stride. No longer just for guacamole, this nutritious fruit is popping up as a healthy addition to various diet plans. But can people with diabetes eat this food? It turns out that avocados are not only safe for people with diabetes, but they may be downright beneficial. Research shows that avocados offer many ways to help people manage their diabetes and improve their overall well-being. Contents of this article: Diet and diabetes A healthy diet is critical for people with diabetes. The foods that they eat each day can have a considerable impact on how they feel and how well their diabetes is controlled. In general, people with diabetes should eat foods that help control blood sugar levels and that offer health benefits such lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. This is one of the best ways to keep diabetes under control, avoid complications, and lead the healthiest life possible. Avocados are an excellent choice for people with diabetes because they offer all these benefits - and possibly more. How do avocados affect blood sugar levels? Blood sugar control is critical for people who have diabetes. A physician or dietitian may advise patients to choose foods that are lower in carbohydrates and sugar. They may also recommend foods that help control blood sugar spikes. An avocado meets both of these requirements. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an average medium avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates. For comparison, an apple has 25 grams of carbohydrates and a banana has 27. A 1-ounce serving, or about one-fifth of an avocado, contains only 3 grams of carbohydrates and less than 1 gram of sugar. With so few carbohydrates, people Continue reading >>

8 Best Smoothies For People With Diabetes

8 Best Smoothies For People With Diabetes

Are smoothies good for diabetes? That depends. If it’s the 32 ounce variety from a smoothie chain with a drive-through, probably not. If you make it at home in your blender, is it then good for diabetes? That depends also. The ingredients that you put in it, specifically the amount of sugar and balance of protein and “good” fats, and the portion size matter. For diabetes, you should be counting your carbohydrates. You should know what a good size smoothie is for you. If you wonder what kinds of things you should put in it to make it healthier and delicious, you have come to the right place. We will help you to make nutritional sense of it all. I enjoy collecting healthy recipes for my patients with diabetes, and for my family. I have compiled a list of the best and healthiest smoothie recipes that I can find on the internet. It is almost fall, and time for Halloween! Autumn is one of my favorite seasons, and the first two smoothies on my list are made to gather the spices of fall into one. If your friends are heading out for a Pumpkin Pie Latte, why not make your own healthier smoothie and invite them to try it? First, let’s see what Brenda’s been drinking. What kind of smoothie did Brenda have? Brenda came into clinic. She was proud of herself because she was drinking smoothies. She had heard they were healthy. Her A1C was still a 9. Her fasting blood sugar was 197 mg/dl. “What kind of things do you put in your smoothie, Brenda,” I said. “Well I put a banana in, and a half cup of blueberries since they’re in season,” she said. “I have to put a few spoons of sugar in cause the blueberries are a little tart, a little early. You know, I put in some honey from the bee keeper down the road. “Oh, ok,” I said, thinking. “Is your glass this big? (I Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Good news for fruit lovers everywhere: eating fresh fruit is associated with a lower risk of diabetes and a lower risk of complications if you already have the disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. Featured recipe: Fresh Fruit Salad If you've been steering clear of fruit because of the sugar content, there's no reason to do so, according to this study. Over a seven-year time period, researchers analyzed the diet and health outcomes of more than 500,000 Chinese adults. The researchers found that higher fruit consumption was not associated with higher blood sugar, even for people with diabetes. Adults who consumed fruit more frequently actually had a lower risk of developing diabetes. The study only analyzed fresh fruit consumption, not dried fruit or fruit juice, so we turned to a few registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators to clarify the best and worst fruits, appropriate serving sizes, and how many carbohydrates you should get from fruit each day. First it's important to note that "diabetes care is individualized," says Staci Freeworth, RD, CDE, and professor of nutrition at Bowling Green State University. This is why it is important for people with diabetes to see a certified diabetes educator (CDE). These specialists can break down how many carbohydrates you should be eating each day based on your individual needs and health history. Best Fruits to Eat Recipe to Try: Purple Fruit Salad Whether you have diabetes or not, the consensus from dietitians is the same regarding which fruits are best to eat. "The best fruits for everyone to eat are the ones that create the least influence on blood sugar, often termed 'low glycemic load,'—even if you don't have diabetes," says Daphne Olivier, RD, CDE, founder of My Food Coach. "These in Continue reading >>

Is Watermelon A Good Fruit For People With Diabetes?

Is Watermelon A Good Fruit For People With Diabetes?

Watermelon is a good fruit choice for people with diabetes, but many people mistakenly think that it is not. The reason has to do with the difference between glycemic index and its glycemic load. The Glycemic Index (GI) is a measure of the effects of carbohydrates on blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates that break down quickly during digestion, releasing glucose rapidly into the bloodstream (like those found in white bread), have a “high GI” (70 or higher); carbohydrates that break down slowly, releasing glucose gradually into the bloodstream (like those in whole grains and legumes), have a “low GI” (55 or lower). The Glycemic Load (GL) is a ranking system for the glycemic impact of foods, based on their carbohydrate content, portion size, and Glycemic Index. Low = 1 to 10; Medium = 11-19; High = 20 or higher. As explained in the book The New Glucose Revolution for Diabetes (Marlowe, 2007), the GL was developed by Harvard researchers, who posited that eating a small amount of a high-GI food would have the same effect on blood sugar as would eating large amounts of a low-GI food. Another issue with looking only at the GI of a food is that it’s tied to the number of grams of carbohydrates in that food and, obviously, that number varies by large amounts. Watermelon is a good illustration of this problem. Watermelon’s GI is high, 72. The GI, however, is based not on a normal portion, but on 50g of carbohydrates — whatever the food. To get 50g of watermelon carbs, you’d have to eat almost 5 cups. GL combines both the quality and the quantity of the actual carbohydrates consumed — and provides one “number.” The GL of one cup of watermelon is about 9, which is low. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes