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Is Avocado Bad For Diabetes

The Many Benefits Of Avocado For Diabetes Treatment And Prevention

The Many Benefits Of Avocado For Diabetes Treatment And Prevention

Avocado and Diabetes Prevention and Treatment Diabetes is a massive health problem with approximately 19 million Americans diagnosed with the disease. There are also believed to be a further 7 million people who are undiagnosed sufferers, according to the National Institute of Diabetes. Thats over 8% of the US population affected by a disease that is the leading cause of kidney failure, new cases of blindness in adults andnon-trauma lower limb amputations. Diabetes is also a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke and now the seventh highest cause of death inthe United States. The primary symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes include significantly increased thirst and hunger and the need to urinate more often. Vision problems, a dry mouth, rapid weight loss and leg pain can also be symptoms. If you exhibit any of these, please see a healthcare professional to have a simple check. Around half a million people in America lose their lives through diabetes each year. Millions more have to deal with the debilitating effects of the disease every day. Even worse, if the current upward trend of newly diagnosed cases continues, it has been predicted that more than half of all American adults will develop diabetes or prediabetes by 2020. This alone would likely collapse our health system, yet conventional medicine does not seem to be making significant inroads into beating the disease. Perhaps this is because it is not some new wonder drug that is needed, but rather a serious change in many of our lifestyles, particularly in the type of foods we eat. If you are already living with the condition, you would be worth reading these 5 important tips for diabetics to help reduce the damage of this debilitating disease. How the Monounsaturated Fats in Avocados Benefit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Add These Five Great Foods To Your Weekly Shop To Lower Blood Sugar

Diabetes Diet: Add These Five Great Foods To Your Weekly Shop To Lower Blood Sugar

Diabetes symptoms are often mild and develop gradually over a number of years. You’re more likely to develop the condition if your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but it can be prevented by taking preventative steps. This includes changing your diet. Carbohydrates turn into glucose after digestion, which raises blood sugar levels. Adding foods to your diet, including avocado and salmon, could help to reduce symptoms. Avocado has lots of monounsaturated fats, which reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, according to medical website Healthline. “That’s huge, because having diabetes doubles your risk for heart attack and stroke compared to someone without diabetes,” it said. Almost 30g of avocado contains just three grams of carbohydrate. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Low-fat cottage cheese Containing just four grams of carbohydrate per half a cup serving, low-fat cottage cheese won’t affect your blood sugar levels much, Healthline said. Greek yogurt or low-fat string cheese could be replaced for low-fat cottage cheese, if they’re more to your taste. Salmon is rich in protein, and a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 reduces the risk of blood clots by making blood less sticky. The fish also has zero carbohydrates per serving. Walnuts A portion of walnuts adds up to about four grams of carbohydrates, and are rich in omega-3. They make a great snack for diabetes patients as they’re a low-carb, healthy alternative, said Healthline. Non-starchy vegetables Vegetables are packed full of fibre, which helps to keep you feeling full for longer. With about five grams o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

9 Foods You Should Be Eating For Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods You Should Be Eating For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Healthy Food Choices for Type 2 Diabetes Paying attention to what you eat is essential for controlling your weight and blood glucose levels when you have type 2 diabetes. While this means knowing which foods to limit or avoid, it’s just as important to know which foods are the most beneficial to you — and how to include them in your meal planning. “When it comes to eating a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, balance is really the key,” says Kelly Kennedy, RD, resident nutritionist for Everyday Health. “Many people think that they have to avoid carbohydrates if they have diabetes, but this is not the case. Instead, it's important to focus on eating approximately the same amount of carbohydrates from healthy sources, such as dairy foods, legumes, fruit, and whole grains, at each meal.” Also make whole foods — such as fruit, vegetables, lean proteins, fat-free or non-fat dairy, whole grains, and healthy fats — your go-tos. “Those provide the most nutritional ‘bang for your buck,'" Kennedy adds. Continue reading >>

Avocado & Blood Sugar

Avocado & Blood Sugar

I was diagnosed with Diabetic Type II last August. I control my blood sugar through exercise and diet and my reading was fantastic which is between 5.0 & 7.00 the maximum. However, my blood sugar will increase to 11.9 when eating Avocado. Do you all have any idea why Avocado is so bad for Diabetic patient ? (I read an article online stated Avocado is good for blood pressure and Diabetic). Please share your thought and experience. I personally do not like avacado, but all I can say is that everyone is different. What some people can eat others can't. Each body is individual. I really don't know the value, nutritional or otherwise, but there are ones here that do eat avacados and don't have a problem. Did you eat it with anything else? We the willing, following the unknowing are doing the impossible. We have done so much for so long with so little that we are now able to do anything with nothing. D.D. Family Glucose Disregulation since 2005 I was diagnosed with Diabetic Type II last August. I control my blood sugar through exercise and diet and my reading was fantastic which is between 5.0 & 7.00 the maximum. However, my blood sugar will increase to 11.9 when eating Avocado. Do you all have any idea why Avocado is so bad for Diabetic patient ? (I read an article online stated Avocado is good for blood pressure and Diabetic). Please share your thought and experience. Acocado is not high in carbs, about 15g for a medium with most of that being fiber. That alone should not raise you BS from 5 to nearly 12 (that is over 200 mg/dl for you yanks). Avocado is thought by many to be a great food for diabetics, but in your case, perhaps not. If you have a food allergy to avocados, you might expect this sort of reaction. Do you have any food allergies? Continue reading >>

Avocado And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And More

Avocado And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And More

Avocados are growing in popularity. The creamy green fruit is packed with vitamins, nutrients, and heart-healthy fats . While they are high in fat, its the good kind of fat that benefits people with type 2 diabetes . If you have type 2 diabetes, adding avocado to your diet may help you lose weight, lower cholesterol, and increase insulin sensitivity. Read on to learn more about the benefits of avocados for people with diabetes. Benefits of avocadofor people with type 2 diabetes Avocados are low in carbohydrates, which means they have little effect on blood sugar levels. A recent study published in Nutrition Journal evaluated the effects of adding half an avocado to the standard lunch of healthy, overweight people. They discovered that avocados do not significantly impact blood sugar levels. Part of what makes avocados a good choice for people with diabetes is that, although they are low in carbs, they are high in fiber. Many other high-fiber foods may still spike blood sugar levels. One half of a small avocado, which is the standard amount people eat, contains about 5.9 grams of carbohydrate and 4.6 grams of fiber. According to the National Academies , the minimum recommended daily fiber intake for adults is: A 2012 review published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine looked at the results of 15 studies involving fiber supplements (around 40 grams of fiber) for people with type 2 diabetes. They found that fiber supplements for type 2 diabetes can reduce fasting blood sugar levels and A1c levels . You dont need to take supplements to achieve these results. Instead, try eating a high-fiber diet. You can easily increase your fiber intake by eating more low-carb fruits, vegetables and plants, like avocados, leafy greens, berries, chia seeds, and nuts. H Continue reading >>

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

If you have diabetes, you know that food plays a big role in controlling your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrate--containing foods, which include sugar, sweets, sugary drinks, grains, starchy vegetables, fruits and some dairy, are converted to sugar during the digestion process and therefore contribute to raising your blood sugar levels after eating. A high--carb intake will result in high blood sugar levels. Video of the Day The nutrition facts for avocado depend on its size. For example, a whole California avocado provides about 227 calories, 11.8 grams of carbohydrates and 9.2 grams of fiber, while a Florida avocado is larger and contains 365 calories, 23.8 grams of carbohydrates and 17.0 grams of fiber. With diabetes, carbohydrates elevate your blood sugar levels, but only the starch and sugar part of the total carbohydrates, not the fiber. Available Carbohydrate and Diabetes To better estimate the effect of avocado on your blood sugar levels, you can calculate their available carbohydrate content by subtracting fiber from the total carbs. In the case of a California avocado, you get 2.6 grams of available carbohydrates, while a Florida avocado contains 6.8 grams of available carbohydates because of its larger size. Usually, diabetics are recommended to limit their carb intake to 45 grams to 60 grams per meal. Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado. Although avocado itself is not likely to hinder your glycemic control, it is often served with high-carb foods such as tortillas, nacho chips and taco shells. If your meal includes foods that have a high carbohydrate content, your blood sugar is likely to rise, so count your carbs to ensure you do not eat more carbo Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Is Avocado Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Diabetes, as we know, is a complicated disease and in order to effectively manage the chronic illness, one has to take a lot of measures with respect to the diet and lifestyle. One of the much-loved fruit all across the world is Avocado. Most of the diabetic patients therefore often ask the question Is Avocado Good or Bad for Diabetics? In this article, we shall deep dive and try to analyze the relationship between Avocado and diabetes in detail. Let us first understand some of the facts related with Avocados. The fruit is a rich source of antioxidants and minerals such as potassium, vitamin E as well as Vitamin C. The fruit is known to be rich in a number of vitamin B such as riboflavin, pyridoxine, niacin, amongst others. They contain high amount of fats but the same is in the form of monosaturated fats, something that is considered good for diabetes An average medium sized Avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates Relationship Between Avocado and the Blood Sugar Level As per the United States Department of Agriculture, an average size of the fruit contains around 17 grams of carbohydrates. Hence, Avocado is a fruit which you can include in your diet without worrying about the increase in the levels of blood glucose. In fact, studies have shown that when you combine this fruit with other foods as part of your diet, any increase in the level of blood glucose is said to decline and stabilize. Other Benefits of Eating Avocado for People Suffering From Diabetes Eating and including Avocado has several health benefits apart from the advantage of stabilizing the level of blood glucose in the body. Some of the other benefits of the fruit include the following: The fruit is a rich source of fiber. Fiber is important as it helps in the smooth digestion of food in the body. Continue reading >>

What Are Some Good Snacks For A Person That Is Diabetic And Has Low Sodium?

What Are Some Good Snacks For A Person That Is Diabetic And Has Low Sodium?

What Are Some Good Snacks for a Person That Is Diabetic and Has Low Sodium? Vegetables dipped in guacamole are a good snack for diabetics. 4 A Simple List of Foods Prediabetics Should Avoid Diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, is associated with many health complications, including kidney diseases. If you are diabetic, you can decrease your risk of developing kidney disease by keeping your blood sugar and blood pressure under control. If your kidneys are already damaged by your diabetes, following a diet that helps you minimize further damage by keeping your blood sugar under control is key. Your doctor and dietitian will keep a close eye on your electrolytes, such as sodium, potassium and phosphorus, to advise you on how to adjust your diet accordingly. Most people with diabetes and kidney diseases have high levels of these electrolytes and need to consume less. Non-starchy vegetables have a very low carbohydrate but high fiber content, which can help to fill you up without increasing your blood sugar levels. If you need a snack to sustain you between meals, prepare yourself a serving of raw vegetables, such as cucumber slices, carrot and celery sticks and cauliflower and broccoli florets. Instead of dipping your vegetables in commercial dipping sauces, which are often made with processed ingredients, use homemade guacamole. Simply mash an avocado and season it with pepper and lemon juice. If your blood sodium is high, don't add salt, and if your sodium is low, be more generous with the amount of salt you add. Although fruits contain some carbohydrates, they also pack a lot of water, fiber and a variety of antioxidants. Don't have too much fruit at once, and limit yourself to the equivalent of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates to prevent your blood sugar levels from rising Continue reading >>

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

As a person with diabetes, I love avocados. That beautiful, alligator-skinned, green-egg shaped thing. Sorry, it doesn’t come with ham. (Oh come on, that was funny!) So, why do I love avocados, and why are they so good for people with diabetes? First of all, it’s low-carb and high in fat, and the fat is all good for you (because it’s mostly a healthy fat). The avocado is also yummy, like butter, except instead of killing you, it’s saving you. I know, I know, big claims, but why? Here are some of the nutritional wonders of the average California avocado: about 320 calories 17 grams carbs 13 grams of fiber 30 grams of fat –> 4 grams of saturated fat (the least healthy kind) –> 20 grams monounsaturated fat (the most healthy kind) –> 4 grams of polyunsaturated fat (a pretty healthy kind) Numerous vitamins and minerals, including the ever so important electrolytes potassium and magnesium. In fact, an avocado usually has 3 times more potassium than a banana does. Now let’s break that down. 320 calories. That’s pretty high, right? So what! With everything you get in this wonder fruit, it’s worth it. Yes, it’s a fruit, not a vegetable. The avocado is also known as an “alligator pear.” 17 grams of carbs and 13 grams of fiber. As people with diabetes, you know that’s a really odd ratio, and it seems that you may not even need to take any insulin when you eat one of these things, because we always substract the fiber from the carbohydrates to calculate our insulin needs. Personally, I don’t need any insulin for an avocado, and that’s part of why I love them. 30 grams of fat. That’s high too, right? So what! The simple myth of “eating fat makes you fat” simply isn’t accurate. Fat doesn’t make you fat. You get 20 grams of monounsaturated fat Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetics?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetics?

Over the years many people have come to fear avocados. I think this largely comes from the weight loss/ low fat industry pushing us not to eat fat because the common thinking is that we'll end up getting fat. Now I hear no end of people saying they avoid avocado, or left questioning is avocado good for diabetics? Well I hope this info helps to clear that up for you because avocado is one of the very best and healthiest foods we can all eat, diabetic or not. So let's dig in. So Is Avocado Good For Diabetics? As you most likely know, as a diabetic the macronutrient you most have to be concerned about is carbohydrates. But as dietitian Aglaee Jacob points out: “Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado”. What she means by available carbohydrates is that fiber does not affect blood sugar levels, only starch and sugar does. So when you subtract the amount of fiber in a food you are left with the net carbs, which is the net effect of that carbohydrate food. Sometimes it seems like a food has quite a bit of carbohydrate but once you minus the fiber you're left with very low ‘available carbohydrate content', just like the avocado in this instance. Avocado Is High In Monounsaturated Fat The fat found in avocado is 71% monounsaturated fat, 13% polyunsaturated, and 16% saturated fat. Monounsaturated fats provide diabetics with valuable health benefits: Eating a diet rich in monounsaturated fat from avocados helps to lower cholesterol and has a beneficial influence on glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes Even after 7 days of eating a high avocado diet, total cholesterol level has been shown to decrease by 17% in hypercholesterolemia patients, 22% decrease in LD Continue reading >>

Apples Are Good For People With Diabetes

Apples Are Good For People With Diabetes

By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Apples are undeniably good for youespecially if you have diabetes. Fall's favorite fruit has lots of good-for-you nutrients. Plus, research has linked apples with certain health benefits related to diabetes. A small apple (about the size of a tennis ball) delivers roughly: 60calories, 16 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber. It's also a good source of vitamin C. Additionally, apples contain quercetin, a type of phytochemicalknown as a flavonoid, which is found in the apples skin. Animal researchand research usingcell cultures havefound the quercetin may help to protect against certain cancers and help to kill cancer cells.In a 2015 study inPharmacognosymagazine, researchers found that quercetin improved glucose metabolism in liver and skeletal cells when studied in test tubes. Apples also containsoluble fiberthe kind that helps keep you full, slows down the absorption of nutrients (such as sugar) into your bloodstream, and helps to lower your cholesterol.In addition to helping to regulate blood sugar and bowel function, soluble fiber is thought to have an anti-inflammatory effect that may help people with diabetes recover faster from infections. The recommended daily intake for fiber is 25 (for women) to 38 (for men) grams a day. Learn which foods to enjoy and avoidand start feeling great! A skinned apple is still good for you, but with skin an apple provides 3grams of fiberabout 12 percent of the recommended total dailyintake. There's no denying fruits and vegetables are a healthy and important part of the diet for everyone, including those with diabetes . Registered Dietitian (RD) and Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), Audrey Koltun, says: "Many people with diabetes are afraid to eat fruit because they think Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

The humble avocado, shunned for years during the fat-free diet craze of the 1990s, may have finally hit its stride. No longer just for guacamole, this nutritious fruit is popping up as a healthy addition to various diet plans. But can people with diabetes eat this food? It turns out that avocados are not only safe for people with diabetes, but they may be downright beneficial. Research shows that avocados offer many ways to help people manage their diabetes and improve their overall well-being. Contents of this article: Diet and diabetes A healthy diet is critical for people with diabetes. The foods that they eat each day can have a considerable impact on how they feel and how well their diabetes is controlled. In general, people with diabetes should eat foods that help control blood sugar levels and that offer health benefits such lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. This is one of the best ways to keep diabetes under control, avoid complications, and lead the healthiest life possible. Avocados are an excellent choice for people with diabetes because they offer all these benefits - and possibly more. How do avocados affect blood sugar levels? Blood sugar control is critical for people who have diabetes. A physician or dietitian may advise patients to choose foods that are lower in carbohydrates and sugar. They may also recommend foods that help control blood sugar spikes. An avocado meets both of these requirements. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an average medium avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates. For comparison, an apple has 25 grams of carbohydrates and a banana has 27. A 1-ounce serving, or about one-fifth of an avocado, contains only 3 grams of carbohydrates and less than 1 gram of sugar. With so few carbohydrates, people Continue reading >>

Diabetes Food Check: Eat Apples & Avocados, Junk Most Things White

Diabetes Food Check: Eat Apples & Avocados, Junk Most Things White

Diabetes Food Check: Eat Apples & Avocados, Junk Most Things White The life you lead and the food you eat are two important factors when it comes to diabetes. Both play a role for those who are already battling it and for those who remain vulnerable to it. Whole foods that are not processed should always be on the menu. But also remember that some items have to be away from the dining table if you want to steer clear of diabetes. Additionally, avoid special diets and stick to what you make at home. Just follow the basic rules like keeping a constant calorie count during meals. Apples & Avocados A Day Really Do Keep The Doctor Away /magazines/panache/diabetes-food-check-eat-apples-avocados-junk-most-things-white/apples-avocados-a-day-really-do-keep-the-doctor-away/slideshow/61639263.cms Apples & Avocados A Day Really Do Keep The Doctor Away A hypoglycaemic fruit, Apple is rich in fibre and an impeccable ingredient for a diabetic. It also contains Pectin, that helps reduce blood sugar levels and the requirement of insulin in the body by almost 50 per cent. There is even a connection between avocados and diabetes. According to a study by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, women who consume good fats (found in avocados) are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Containing alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which can be converted into omega-3 fatty acids, Flaxseeds offer benefits similar to consuming fish. They are also a good source of lignans and antioxidants. According to the National Institutes of Health, flaxseeds may help in lowering hemoglobin A1C in people with type 2 diabetes. Another study shows that when people with type 2 diabetes include flaxseeds in their diet, blood glucose levels decrease. So whether you add it to your cereal, on salads, or whip up a smo Continue reading >>

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