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Is Apple Good For Diabetes 2

Apple Picks 13 Apps For People With Diabetes

Apple Picks 13 Apps For People With Diabetes

Apple periodically updates its app store with lists of apps for particular groups of people. Even as the new iOS 8, with a built in Health app, goes into beta, Apple has added a new list: "Apple's Apps for Diabetics." According to the CDC's 2011 fact sheet, diabetes affects 25.8 million people, or 8.3 percent of the US population. The apps on Apple's list aren't all from the US, and they don't all target diabetes specifically. While many are tracking and management apps for blood glucose and insulin levels, others are more general purpose apps for eating specific diets, which people with diabetes could benefit from. The list includes mostly consumer-facing apps but one app for doctors, as well as one for kids and one for pregnant women with diabetes. The list has some overlap with the list of top-grossing diabetes apps Research2Guidance released in March, but app developer Azumio, which Research2Guidance identified as the market leader, has no apps on Apple's list. Read on for 13 apps Apple has highlighted for its users with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Diabetik by UglyApps (free) This British-made diabetes app raised $11,600 on Kickstarter in February 2013. It's a free app for diabetes management that focuses on quick data entry and aesthetically designed interactive charts, as well as reminders that can trigger either at a particular time or in particular location. The app helps people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes monitor how much and how often they’re eating, their blood glucose levels, and whether they’ve taken their medication. Diabetes in Check by Everyday Health (free) Diabetes in Check, from the recently-IPO'd Everyday Health is a type 2 diabetes management app that features a wide range of tools. It includes diabetes coaching designed by a certified d Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Apples Vs Applesauce For Weight Loss?

Apples Vs Applesauce For Weight Loss?

Have you ever wondered if applesauce is as good for you as apples since, well, it seems to be pretty much just made up of apples right? Sure, the primary ingredient is you guessed it… apples, but that doesn’t mean that they’re equal in regards to nutrition. They look completely different and that difference leads right into the nitty-gritty, too. An apple a day keeps the Doctor away Research is proving that this old saying has a lot of truth – eating apples does help to reach a longer, healthier life. Some of the reasons why: High in Fiber Very Low Glycemic Index Flavanoids Rich in Antioxidents Boost growth of good gut bacteria These lead to many health benefits, such as Lowering Cholesterol, reduce the risk of stroke, cancer, hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease, and helps reduce nerve cell damage from oxidation of neurons You might assume that naturally raw apples would be better for you and more nutritious. But believe it or not, which one you eat (or you decide to give to your kids) might have a lot to do with your dietary preferences and needs. Let’s take a look at some of the points to consider when choosing between apples or applesauce. Fiber – No Difference Fiber is an important part of any diet. Getting enough fiber will help your digestion system work more efficiently and also keep you feeling fuller for longer. Apples and applesauce are both normally a good source of dietary fiber. Both applesauce and apples will provide you the same amount of fiber, 3 grams per cup (cup of raw apple slices or a cup of applesauce). Men and women are different: men should get about 38 grams daily and women should get about 25 grams. So for fiber, the question is which you prefer and how much fiber should you be adding to your diet? Calories – Applesauce 3x m Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes involves making changes to your lifestyle, through diet, weight control and physical activity. Medication for diabetes, whether in tablet or injection form, is definitely not the only way to control your blood sugar (glucose) levels. How does type 2 diabetes affect your weight? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. The food you eat on a daily basis plays an important role in managing your diabetes, as well as ensuring you keep well and have enough energy for your daily activities. The same healthy eating principles apply whether you have diabetes or not. In fact, getting the whole family to eat this sort of balanced diet if you have diabetes can benefit their health as well as yours. Including foods from each of the main food groups described below will provide your body with the essential nutrients. See also separate leaflet called Healthy Eating. Fruit Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is diabetes? When a food containing carbohydrate is eaten, your body digests the carbohydrate into sugar (called glucose), which can then be used as energy by the cells in your body. Diabetes is a condition where your body can’t properly control the amount of glucose in your blood. A hormone called insulin is needed for transferring glucose from the bloodstream to enter the body cells and be converted to energy. In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are often higher than normal because either the body does not produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). High levels of glucose in the bloodstream can lead to short term complications such as: passing large amounts of urine being extremely thirsty and drinking lots of fluids being tired having blurred vision having frequent skin infections and being slow to heal Blood glucose levels are normally between about 4.0 and 8.0 mmol/L. People with diabetes should aim for blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible, but individual targets should always be discussed with your diabetes health care professional. Controlling diabetes is important to prevent serious long term complications such as: heart and circulation problems infections kidney disease eye problems, which can lead to blindness nerve damage to the lower limbs and other parts of the body Types of diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes affects less than 1% of all Australians. It can appear at any age, but most commonly in childhood and early adult life. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce enough insulin, and therefore they must inject themselves with insulin several times a day. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 7.1 % of a Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

For many years, apple cider vinegar has been linked with an array of health benefits. These have ranged from aiding weight loss to relieving cold symptoms. But does taking it help people with diabetes? The majority of the health claims around apple cider vinegar have yet to be supported by clinical research. However, evidence has been emerging to suggest that apple cider vinegar may have certain benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes. This article will discuss the research behind this claim and how apple cider vinegar should be taken, if at all. What is apple cider vinegar? Vinegar can be made from nearly any carbohydrate. Apple cider vinegar is derived from cider or freshly pressed apple juice. Like most vinegars, apple cider vinegar is produced after a slow process spanning several weeks or months in which sugars are broken down. Mother of vinegar is a cobweb-like substance made from yeast and bacteria that builds up during this period. Mother of vinegar gives the vinegar a cloudy appearance and it is only present in unfiltered apple cider vinegar. It is thought to boost the vinegar's nutritional value. However, most vinegar is pasteurized. This heating process kills bacteria but prevents mother of vinegar from forming. Apple cider vinegar and diabetes In 1980, there were around 108 million people with diabetes worldwide. Its prevalence has increased greatly over the past few decades to an estimated 422 million. Diabetes is a chronic condition marked by an inability to manage blood sugar levels appropriately. The hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels is called insulin. People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce this hormone. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin or respond appropriately to the hormone. People c Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Apples

The Health Benefits Of Apples

We’re right in the middle of October. Here in New England, the leaves are changing, the weather is crisper, and it’s prime time for apples! In fact, October just happens to be National Apple Month, and rightly so. With so many luscious varieties available, it would be a shame not to indulge and reap the health benefits of apples. Apple fun facts Curious about apples? Here are a few fun facts to digest: • About 2,500 varieties of apples are grown in the U.S., and 100 varieties are grown commercially. • Apples are grown in all 50 states. • Apples were the favorite fruit of the ancient Greeks and Romans. • The size of apples ranges from roughly the size of a cherry to the size of a grapefruit. • The top 10 apple varieties sold in the United States are Gala, Red Delicious, Fuji, Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Golden Delicious, McIntosh, Cripp’s Pink Lady, Braeburn, and Jazz. • One of the oldest varieties of apples in existence is the Lady apple. • A food-grade wax is applied to many varieties of apples after harvesting. • Apples ripen 6–10 times faster at room temperature than in the refrigerator. I could go on about apples! Who knew that there was so much to know about them? Apple nutrition Despite all of the apple lore, you might be wondering if apples fit into a diabetes eating plan. The answer, plain and simple, is absolutely yes! First, here’s a breakdown of the nutritional value of an “average” apple (the nutrition numbers will vary somewhat from apple to apple, and, of course, based on the size of the apple). One small, 6-ounce apple contains the following: • 80 calories • 21 grams of carbohydrate • 4 grams of fiber • 0 grams of protein • 0 grams of fat • 2 milligrams of sodium • 164 milligrams of potassium In addition, apples c Continue reading >>

Fruit List For Diabetics

Fruit List For Diabetics

Often people suffering from diabetes avoid fruits out of fear that the sugar present in fruits could push up their blood sugar level. However, this is a false conception. Most fruits, specifically fruits rich in fibers, are beneficial for reducing the blood sugar level. Sugar present in fruits is usually in the form of fructose. Unlike other forms of sugar, such as sucrose, fructose has low glucemic index. Minimal insulin is needed for the metabolism of fructose. Intake of this fruit sugar is not associated with sudden surge of the blood sugar level. Studies have shown that by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride production, fructose could protect us from diseases such as arteriosclerosis, which leads to heart diseases and stroke. Diabetes bad food includes those that have high glycemic indexes for glucose- which includes those foods that are high in saturated fats and uncontrollably high amounts of sugar in any of its forms- especially sugar from milk. Which brings us back to our main concern- what kinds of fruits can a diabetic eat? Fruits for diabetics are usually those fruits that have high fiber content and have low sugar content. If we take these criteria and apply it, the first fruit that would come to mind would be the high and mighty avocado. But beware; the large avocados have a lot of calories in it- so if you buy the large avocado from florida, make sure you regulate your calorie intake for the rest of the day. Diabetics should NOT eat cooked fruit. Always eat raw fruits in order to reap the benefits. Here's a list of fruits that are beneficial for Diabetics. Any type of wild or organic berry - Seasons: Range All Year Blueberries, Elderberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Strawberries etc. There are loads to choose from. You can find their respective season Continue reading >>

Fibre

Fibre

Fibre is the part of plants that our bodies cannot digest. There are two types of fibre: soluble and insoluble. Foods such as vegetables, fruits, legumes and whole grains contain fibre. Animal foods such as meats and eggs have no fibre. What is the difference between soluble and insoluble fibre? Soluble fibre is the soft fibre that helps control blood glucose (sugar) and reduces cholesterol. It also helps in managing diarrhea. Soluble fibre is present in oat bran, oatmeal, legumes (dried beans and lentils) and fruits such as apples and strawberries. Insoluble fibre is the bulky fibre that helps to prevent constipation. It also helps to prevent some types of cancers. It is present in wheat bran, whole grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables. Many foods contain both soluble and insoluble fibre. Why is fibre good for me? Fibre is important for your overall health. Some of its benefits include: Controlling blood glucose (sugar) Managing blood pressure Reducing blood cholesterol Increasing the feeling of being full Controling weight Regulating bowel movement Benefit for those with diabetes Soluble fibre in oat bran, legumes (dried beans of all kinds, peas and lentils), and pectin (from fruit, such as apples) and forms in root vegetables (such as carrots) is considered especially helpful for people with either form of diabetes. Soluble fibre may help control blood sugar by delaying gastric (stomach) emptying, retarding the entry of glucose into the bloodstream and lessening the postprandial (post-meal) rise in blood sugar. It may lessen insulin requirements in those with type 1 diabetes. Because fibre slows the digestion of foods, it can help blunt the sudden spikes in blood glucose (sugar) that may occur after a low-fibre meal. Such blood sugar peaks stimulate the pa Continue reading >>

How It Serves Blood Sugar Health

How It Serves Blood Sugar Health

The Secret of Apple Pie Who could have guessed that America's favorite dessert harbors a health-giving secret? ype 2 diabetes mellitus (also called adult-onset, or non-insulin dependent, diabetes mellitus) is becoming more prevalent, not only in the United States, but worldwide. Is this disease a modern "invention," i.e., is our modern diet responsible because it has strayed so far from the kinds of foods our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate for countless millennia? Could these dietary changes have altered the way in which some of our genes are expressed? In the following interview conducted by Life Enhancement's Will Block, the prominent natural medicine physician Jonathan V. Wright, M.D., gives us some insight into the problems of type 2 diabetes and reveals an unexpected new factor with a surprising health benefit: apple pie! Dr. Wright describes the exciting possibilities of a new supplement, methylhydroxychalcone polymer (MHCP), a compound found in cinnamon. If you want to avoid falling prey to type 2 diabetes, read on. LE: How prevalent is type 2 diabetes? DR. WRIGHT: In the United States alone, approximately 15 million adults have type 2 diabetes (that's about 90% of all diabetes), which mainly affects people over 40. The primary cause is obesity, brought on by lack of exercise and our Western diet, which is high in carbohydrates and fats, but low in many essential nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids. Although there is certainly a genetic link to type 2 diabetes, it would not express itself strongly were it not for our physical inactivity and unhealthy diet, and the disease would be rare. The disease is thus largely preventable. By contrast, type 1 diabetes mellitus (also called juvenile-onset, or insulin dependent, diabetes mellitus) is an autoimmune disease b Continue reading >>

Are Apples Good For Diabetes?

Are Apples Good For Diabetes?

Apples are widely recognized as part of a nutritious diet. But if you have diabetes, you may be concerned about this fruit's impact on your blood glucose levels. Like all fruits, apples are rich in sugar, a form of carbohydrates which the body converts into glucose. Eating too much carbohydrates at once, or too much overall can lead to elevated blood glucose levels. The good news is that the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the inclusion of fruit, including fiber-rich apples, in a diabetes meal plan as long as these foods are fit into your carbohydrate targets. Blood Sugar Impact When digested, the carbohydrates from apples are broken down into glucose, a simple form of sugar. As this glucose enters the blood, insulin is needed to help convert this sugar into energy. However, people with diabetes either don’t make enough insulin, or their insulin doesn’t work well, and as a result, dietary carbohydrates have the potential to lead to high blood glucose levels. To best manage blood glucose levels, it’s helpful to eat moderate portions of carbohydrate-containing foods and to spread these foods throughout the day. Alternatively, if you take fast-acting insulin at meals, you can eat according to your appetite and preferences, since you can learn to match your insulin dose to your carbohydrate intake. Apples and Diabetes Research There's no denying fruits and vegetables are a healthy and important part of the diet for everyone, including diabetics. Eating whole fruits, but particularly apples, blueberries and grapes is linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2014 study published in BMJ. Note that according to the same study, drinking fruit juice is linked with a higher risk of diabetes. That being said, a few studies have examined the pro Continue reading >>

Diet Dos And Don'ts For Diabetics!

Diet Dos And Don'ts For Diabetics!

Home > Get Ahead > Living > Health his is the concluding part of a two-part series on diet tips for the diabetics, by dietitians Priya Khanna and Seema Tarneja: Part I: Diabetics, heed these diet tips! Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder in which the body fails to convert sugars, starches and other foods into energy. Many of the foods you eat are normally converted into a type of sugar called glucose during digestion. The bloodstream then carries glucose through the body. The hormone, insulin, then turns glucose into quick energy or is stored for futher use. In diabetic people, the body either does not make enough insulin or it cannot use the insulin correctly. This is why too much glucose builds in the bloodstream. There are two major types of diabetes: 1. Type 1 This is popularly known as Juvenile Onset Diabetes. Here, the body produces little or no insulin. It occurs most often in childhood or in the teens and could be inherited. People with this type of diabetes need daily injections of insulin. They must balance their daily intake of food and activites carefully with their insulin shots to stay alive. 2. Type 2 Also known as Adult Onset Diabetes, this occurs around 35 to 40 years. The more common of the two types, it accounts for about 80 per cent of the diabetics. Here, though the pancreas produce adequate insulin, body cells show reduced sensitivity towards it. Type 2 diabetes is usually triggered by obesity. The best way to fight it is by weight loss, exercise and dietary control. Sometimes, oral medication or insulin injections are also needed. ~ Symptoms of diabetes Here are a few: Extreme thirst and hunger Frequent urination Sores or bruises that heal slowly Dry, itchy skin Unexplained weight loss Unusual tiredness or drowsiness Tingling or numb Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

Is there a way to reverse diabetes? Specifically, type 2 diabetes? You might be surprised to discover there are three unbelievable natural remedies that I don’t believe the medical establishment—or, more specifically, the pharmaceutical companies—want you to know about. Why would they not want you to know about this stuff? It’s because the pharmaceutical industry is a gigantic machine which has to sustain itself. The diabetic industry alone is massive, owing to the fact that over 300 million people in the world have type 2 diabetes. The treatments and medication used to treat diabetes are big business, so why would these companies be at all interested in truly reversing diabetes? How would that benefit them financially? Unfortunately, a lot of diabetes drugs don’t actually work, or work with limited success and a lot of potential side effects. Science has shown that—in terms of diabetic management—these drugs are more dangerous than anything. Drugs used in the 1950s, for the most part, have all been taken off the market because they were shown to increase the risk of heart disease. This has even happened recently with drugs like Avandia. It was the world’s most popular Type 2 diabetes drug until it was revealed to have side effects that caused serious heart problems. New drugs haven’t proven to be much better. With that in mind, I’m going to share with you 3 amazing, all-natural solutions to reverse diabetes. Even if you don’t have type 2 diabetes, these solutions can help you prevent it. Here’s something I want you to realize; please never forget this: If you have type two diabetes, it’s not a life sentence. It’s actually one of the easiest—and I don’t say that in a condescending way; I say it in an optimistic way—diseases to completel Continue reading >>

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