diabetestalk.net

Is Apple Good For Diabetes 2

‘water Apple’ Extract May Provide Dietary Support For Diabetes

‘water Apple’ Extract May Provide Dietary Support For Diabetes

According to research published in Food Chemistry​​, extracts of water apple (Syzygium aqueum​) leaf may contain flavanoids that have the ability to stabilise or lower blood sugar levels – referred to as anti-hyperglycaemic activity. The research team, led by Dr Uma Palanisamy, and based at Monash University in Malaysia, explained that the extract was found to contain six flavanoid compounds some of which were established to be more effective than certain anti-diabetes drugs in blocking the action of carbohydrate hydrolysing enzymes (that are key to blood sugar management). “The results obtained in this study and our on-going work will provide the biochemical rationale to include specific​​S. aqueum​leaf extract, or its bioactivity, as part of a dietary support for managing hyperglycaemia linked to Type-2 diabetes,”​ said Palanisamy and her colleagues. “The active compounds of S. aqueum​ leaf were seen to inhibit α-glucosidase and α-amylase activity far better than the antidiabetic drug, acarbose,”​ they revealed. Palanisamy and her team said their findings provide ‘a strong rationale’ to establish for the water apple’s capability as an anti-hyperglycaemic agent. Study details​ The research team found and isolated six flavonoid compounds from the leaf extract: 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, myricetin-3-O​-rhamnoside, europetin-3-O​-rhamnoside, phloretin, myrigalone-G, and myrigalone-B. “Our investigation revealed [the extracts] effectiveness in inhibiting the carbohydrate hydrolysing enzymes, α-glucosidase (EC​50​ = 11 μg/ml) and α-amylase (EC​50​ = 8 μg/ml), at significant level than the commercial drug acarbose (EC​50​ = 28 μg/ml, α-glucosidase; EC​50​ = 12 μg/ml, α-amylase),”​ wrote Palanisamy and her co Continue reading >>

Apple Picks 13 Apps For People With Diabetes

Apple Picks 13 Apps For People With Diabetes

Apple periodically updates its app store with lists of apps for particular groups of people. Even as the new iOS 8, with a built in Health app, goes into beta, Apple has added a new list: "Apple's Apps for Diabetics." According to the CDC's 2011 fact sheet, diabetes affects 25.8 million people, or 8.3 percent of the US population. The apps on Apple's list aren't all from the US, and they don't all target diabetes specifically. While many are tracking and management apps for blood glucose and insulin levels, others are more general purpose apps for eating specific diets, which people with diabetes could benefit from. The list includes mostly consumer-facing apps but one app for doctors, as well as one for kids and one for pregnant women with diabetes. The list has some overlap with the list of top-grossing diabetes apps Research2Guidance released in March, but app developer Azumio, which Research2Guidance identified as the market leader, has no apps on Apple's list. Read on for 13 apps Apple has highlighted for its users with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Diabetik by UglyApps (free) This British-made diabetes app raised $11,600 on Kickstarter in February 2013. It's a free app for diabetes management that focuses on quick data entry and aesthetically designed interactive charts, as well as reminders that can trigger either at a particular time or in particular location. The app helps people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes monitor how much and how often they’re eating, their blood glucose levels, and whether they’ve taken their medication. Diabetes in Check by Everyday Health (free) Diabetes in Check, from the recently-IPO'd Everyday Health is a type 2 diabetes management app that features a wide range of tools. It includes diabetes coaching designed by a certified d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Fiber-packed Pectin Helps Treat High Cholesterol & Diabetes

Fiber-packed Pectin Helps Treat High Cholesterol & Diabetes

Pectin is a carbohydrate that’s extracted from fruits, vegetables and seeds. The main use for pectin is as a gelling agent, thickening agent and stabilizer in food. It’s sold commercially as a white- to light-brown powder that is extracted from citrus fruits. Companies commonly use pectin in food as a gelling agent, particularly in jams and jellies. Pectin is also used in fillings, medicines, laxatives, throat lozenges, sweets, fruit juices, milk drinks and as a source of dietary fiber. Nutrition-rich pears, apples, guavas, quince, plums, oranges and other citrus fruits contain large amounts of pectin, while soft fruits like cherries and strawberries contain small amounts of pectin. Because pectin is a high source of fiber, it’s commonly used in a high-fiber diet to treat constipation and digestive issues. It’s also known to naturally lower cholesterol, fight diabetes and support weight loss. Pectin Nutrition Facts Pectin is a natural fiber found in most plants. Apples and oranges, for example, are particularly high in pectin, with the highest concentrations in the skins, cores and seeds. You can extract pectin from fruits, or you can purchase a dry mix of pectin at your local health food store. One package of an unsweetened, dry mix of pectin has about: 163 calories zero grams fat zero milligrams cholesterol 100 milligrams sodium 45 grams carbohydrates 4 grams dietary fiber 0.2 milligrams copper (11 percent DV) 0.2 milligrams zinc (2 percent DV) 0.01 milligrams manganese (2 percent DV) 5 Pectin Benefits 1. High Source of Fiber Pectin fiber is more than just a regulator — it’s a benefit-rich fiber that’s water-soluble and helps lower cholesterol and increases digestive health. As a soluble fiber, pectin works by binding to fatty substances in the digestive Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type II Diabetes: 6 Fruits to Help Control Your Blood Sugar Controlling your diabetes could be as easy as losing weight. There are many things that you can do to control you blood sugar and increasing your intake of certain fruits is one of them. Natural sugar is easier to break down than processed or man-made sugar. This is why adding fruit, a great source for natural sugar, to your diet in moderation could prevent your body from building an insulin intolerance. Here are our favorite fruits to add to your diet if you are looking to naturally control your blood sugar, or decrease the amount of insulin that you use each day. 1. Avocado Avocado is thought by many to be a vegetable. On the contrary, it is actually a fruit. This fruit is high in monounsaturated fats which are one of the healthy fats that you should ingest on a regular basis. These fruits also improve heart health. They have a very low percentage of low-quality carbohydrates and can improve the sensitivity you have to your insulin. This means that simply snacking on avocado, eating guacamole, or adding it to a sandwich could decrease the amount of insulin that you have to take. 2. Grapefruits Grapefruits are a great source of chromium. Recent studies have shown chromium to significantly lower blood sugar levels. A grapefruit with breakfast can help break down the dietary sugars that are in your cereal as well. It also contains a very low amount of carbohydrates but most of these carbohydrates are considered healthy fiber so they won’t cause a serious increase in blood sugar. 3. Pineapples Pineapple does not prevent blood sugar spikes. However, it has a low glycemic index, which means that it raises your blood sugar slower and does not cause rapid spikes. This means that when your blood sugar starts low, it Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Top 10 Fruits For Diabetics

Top 10 Fruits For Diabetics

According to the American Diabetes Association, 25.8 million Americans have diabetes and by 2020 half of all Americans will suffer from this disease. Diabetes causes high blood sugar (glucose) levels due to lack of insulin production or function. It is mainly classified as either Type 1, in which the body fails to produce insulin, or Type 2, in which the body is not able to properly use the insulin it produces. It is essential to control diabetes because it can lead to a host of health complications including kidney failure, nerve damage, blindness, heart attacks, strokes, poor blood circulation, hearing loss and many more. A healthy lifestyle that includes a proper diet, exercise, proper sleep, less stress and so on plays a major role in controlling blood glucose levels. A diabetes diet plan should include foods that are high in nutrients, low in fat, moderate in calories and few sugary foods. As fruits are generally sweet, people often think that a diabetic person should avoid eating them. But there are several fruits that are particularly effective at managing blood sugar. Packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients, fruits are a healthy addition to any diet. Some fruits are better than others for diabetics. Moreover, diabetics also need to consider factors like glycemic index and glycemic load as they offer information on how different foods affect blood sugar and insulin levels. Low glycemic index foods are believed to have a beneficial effect on blood glucose control as they do not significantly impact blood sugar levels. Usually, foods with a glycemic index score of 55 and below are classified as low glycemic index foods. Those with a glycemic index score of 70 and above are considered high glycemic index foods. 1. Apples The crunchy, juicy an Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Best 15 Fruits For Diabetics

Best 15 Fruits For Diabetics

Which are the best fruits for diabetics? This is the common question which arises in the minds of the diabetics as many of them believe that they can”t eat fruits as all fruits contain high sugar content. But there are lots of healthy fruits for diabetics which do not increase the blood glucose level and these fruits for diabetics could be said to be best fruits for diabetics. Fruits having these two characteristics are particularly beneficial fruits for diabetic patients: Low Glycemic Index -Fruits with low Glycemic Index(GI) are good for people with diabetes. Glycemic Index describes the effect of carbohydrates present in food materials on our blood glucose levels. Fruits with low GI will produce small change in our blood glucose and levels of insulin. Low GI fruits release the glucose slowly into the blood which avoids the sudden rise in blood glucose levels. This is an important factor in diabetes management. High Fiber content -Fruits especially rich in fiber are good fruits for diabetics as they have a low glycemic index. Fibers present in these fruits slow down the absorption rate of sugar in the bloodstream. Hence these are good fruits for diabetes. List of Best Fruits for Diabetics The healthy fruits for diabetics are listed below: -Called as a “diabetes superfood” by American Diabetes Association blueberries help the body to efficiently process blood glucose for energy. Blueberries have low calorie content which also helps in weight loss and losing belly fat. Fruits for diabetes increase the sensitivity towards insulin and help in managing blood glucose levels. -Grapefruits help in weight loss and this in turn helps to reduce insulin resistance. A study has found that consuming grapefruit could help in diabetes treatment. Scientists have found that an an Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

Pears And Diabetes

Pears And Diabetes

Pears: A Sweet You Can Eat Type 2 Diabetes: Overview We naturally have sugar in the bloodstream that provides energy to every body cell. Healthy levels of this sugar, glucose, are maintained by insulin, a hormone secreted when blood sugar rises too high. Type 2 diabetes happens when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or your body’s cells don’t respond normally to insulin, called insulin resistance. This causes high blood sugar and immediately starts to starve cells of energy. Over time, high blood sugar damages sensitive tissues, such as those in the extremities, eyes, and kidneys. What Should I Eat? Following a regular meal plan, being active, taking medications, and tracking your blood sugar levels will help you manage your diabetes. Indeed, you may be able to control your diabetes just by eating healthfully and exercising regularly. Most people benefit from 3 meals plus 2 to 3 snacks every day. For easy snacking ideas, click here. What are Carbohydrates? Carbohydrates provide energy, and every cell needs energy. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, seeds, beans, and dairy and come in three forms, sugars, starches, and fiber. Sugars are the simplest, most easily absorbed carbohydrates and include glucose needed to sustain energy. Starches are longer chains of sugars. Fiber is the indigestible part of a plant. While it is generally not digested, it may offer cardiovascular and digestive benefits. Why Pears? Everyone’s digestive system needs carbohydrates, and it is best to balance them with fiber, protein, or fat at every meal. Balancing carbohydrates decreases the rate of absorption of glucose, so your blood sugar won’t spike as dramatically. Good carbohydrate choices are those that already contain these nutrients, such as fiber-ri Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes involves making changes to your lifestyle, through diet, weight control and physical activity. Medication for diabetes, whether in tablet or injection form, is definitely not the only way to control your blood sugar (glucose) levels. How does type 2 diabetes affect your weight? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. The food you eat on a daily basis plays an important role in managing your diabetes, as well as ensuring you keep well and have enough energy for your daily activities. The same healthy eating principles apply whether you have diabetes or not. In fact, getting the whole family to eat this sort of balanced diet if you have diabetes can benefit their health as well as yours. Including foods from each of the main food groups described below will provide your body with the essential nutrients. See also separate leaflet called Healthy Eating. Fruit Continue reading >>

Do Apples Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels?

Do Apples Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels?

Apples are delicious, nutritious and convenient to eat. Studies have shown that they have several health benefits. Yet apples also contain carbs, which impact blood sugar levels. However, the carbs found in apples affect your body differently than the sugars found in junk foods. This article explains how apples affect blood sugar levels and how to incorporate them into your diet if you have diabetes. Apples are one of the most popular fruits in the world. They're also highly nutritious. In fact, apples are high in vitamin C, fiber and several antioxidants. One medium apple contains 95 calories, 25 grams of carbs and 14% of the daily value for vitamin C (1). Interestingly, a large part of an apple's nutrients is found in its colorful skin (2). Furthermore, apples contain large amounts of water and fiber, which make them surprisingly filling. You're likely to be satisfied after eating just one (3). Apples are a good source of fiber, vitamin C and antioxidants. They also help you feel full without consuming a lot of calories. If you have diabetes, keeping tabs on your carbohydrate intake is important. That's because of the three macronutrients — carbs, fat and protein — carbs affect your blood sugar levels the most. That being said, not all carbs are created equal. A medium apple contains 25 grams of carbs, but 4.4 of those are fiber (1). Fiber slows down the digestion and absorption of carbs, causing them to not spike your blood sugar levels nearly as quickly (4). Studies show that fiber is protective against type 2 diabetes, and that many types of fiber can improve blood sugar control (5, 6). Apples contain carbs, which can raise blood sugar levels. However, the fiber in apples helps stabilize blood sugar levels, in addition to providing other health benefits. Apples Continue reading >>

Eating Fruit Significantly Cuts Diabetes Risk - But Drinking Juice Increases It, Says Study

Eating Fruit Significantly Cuts Diabetes Risk - But Drinking Juice Increases It, Says Study

INDYPULSE Eating fruit significantly cuts diabetes risk - but drinking juice INCREASES it, says study Eating blueberries, grapes, apples and pears cuts the risk of type 2 diabetes but drinking fruit juice can increase it, a large study has found. Experts from the UK, Singapore and a team from Harvard School of Public Health in the US have examined whether certain fruits impact on type 2, which affects more than 3,000,000 people in Britain. The scientists found that blueberries, grapes, raisins, apples and pears were especially protective, while drinking fruit juice could increase the risk of developing the condition by as much as 8 percent. People who ate three standard servings of blueberries a week had a 26 percent lower chance of developing the condition, they found. Those who replaced fruit juices with three helpings of particular whole fruits a week, including apples and pears could expect a 7 percent drop in their risk of developing type 2. Eating different fruits affected an individual's chances of developing the condition in different ways, the research suggests. Those eating grapes and raisins had a 12 percent reduced risk. Prunes also had a protective effect, giving an 11 percent drop in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Other fruits such as bananas, plums, peaches and apricots had a negligible impact but drinking fruit juice increased the risk by 8 per cent, according to the study. For individual fruits, replacing three servings a week of fruit juice with blueberries cut the risk by 33 percent while replacing juice with grapes and raisins cut the risk by 19 percent. The risk was also 14 percent lower if juice was replaced with apples and pears, 13 percent lower if replaced with bananas and 12 percent lower if replaced with grapefruit. Qi Sun, one of the Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is diabetes? When a food containing carbohydrate is eaten, your body digests the carbohydrate into sugar (called glucose), which can then be used as energy by the cells in your body. Diabetes is a condition where your body can’t properly control the amount of glucose in your blood. A hormone called insulin is needed for transferring glucose from the bloodstream to enter the body cells and be converted to energy. In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are often higher than normal because either the body does not produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). High levels of glucose in the bloodstream can lead to short term complications such as: passing large amounts of urine being extremely thirsty and drinking lots of fluids being tired having blurred vision having frequent skin infections and being slow to heal Blood glucose levels are normally between about 4.0 and 8.0 mmol/L. People with diabetes should aim for blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible, but individual targets should always be discussed with your diabetes health care professional. Controlling diabetes is important to prevent serious long term complications such as: heart and circulation problems infections kidney disease eye problems, which can lead to blindness nerve damage to the lower limbs and other parts of the body Types of diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes affects less than 1% of all Australians. It can appear at any age, but most commonly in childhood and early adult life. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce enough insulin, and therefore they must inject themselves with insulin several times a day. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 7.1 % of a Continue reading >>

More in diabetes