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Is Almond Safe For Diabetics?

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

When you’re looking for a satisfying diabetes-friendly snack, it’s hard to beat nuts. “Nuts are a super snack food for people with diabetes because they’re the total package — low in carbs and high in protein, fiber, and healthy fat — and they create a feeling of fullness,” says Cheryl Mussatto, RD, founder of Eat Well to Be Well in Osage City, Kansas. Nuts: A Good Choice for Diabetes and Your Heart The healthy fat in nuts protects your ticker, says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. That’s important because people with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to die of heart disease than those without it, according to the American Heart Association. Heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, Mussatto says. “At the same time, nuts also raise levels of ‘good,’ or HDL, cholesterol,” she says. “This cholesterol acts sort of like a sanitation worker, removing cholesterol from the tissues for disposal, which prevents plaque buildup in the arteries.” What’s more, nuts help regulate blood sugar, which makes them a better option to reach for than, say, pretzels, when afternoon hunger strikes, Mussatto says. Many kinds of nuts have this effect: Almonds have been shown to slow down the blood sugar response when eaten with carbohydrate-rich foods, according to a small study published in the journal Metabolism that focused on healthy people without the disease. A study published in March 2011 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found similar results for pistachios when eaten by healthy volunteers. For those people already diagnosed with diabetes, regularly eating tree nuts can also improve blood sugar management, Continue reading >>

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Last year everyone was talking about how good nuts are for diabetes. This year they’re just as good, and new research shows it. If you aren’t eating lots of nuts yet, I’m going to try to get you started. Nuts are great because they are seeds and fruit combined. They are literally full of life. According to Wikipedia, while fruit seeds are separate from the fruit itself, in nuts (according to the botanical definition of the term), the seeds and fruit (which the seed will use to grow if planted) are bound up together, making them among the most nutritious foods on the planet. New research from Louisiana State University found that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews — have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Their C-reactive protein (a major marker of inflammation) levels were lower. Their HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels were higher. According to The Huffington Post, the study was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. Study results often show what the funders wanted them to show, but I tend to believe this one. It appeared in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition and was based on analyzing data from NHANES, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gold standard for this kind of study in the US. This research confirms dozens of other studies. As Web Editor Diane Fennell wrote in 2011, “Nuts are well known for their nutritional benefits, including their high levels of heart-healthy fats, protein, antioxidants…, plant sterols (natural substances found in plants that can help lower cholesterol), fiber, and minerals.” Nutritionist Amy Campbell explained in this article that nuts are good because they h Continue reading >>

Heart Healthy Benefits Of Almonds For Type 2 Diabetes

Heart Healthy Benefits Of Almonds For Type 2 Diabetes

Almonds have a rich cultural history that dates back centuries – they’re even mentioned in the Bible! And even now, they're still an extremely popular healthy snack. Almonds can be eaten whole, flavored, or roasted. They’re commonly found in baked goods and cereals, as well as in healthy staples such as almond milk and almond flour. And when it comes to type 2 diabetes, you'll be happy to learn that these are one of many nuts you can truly enjoy! Almonds Nutrition Facts Almonds are a fantastic source of healthy monounsaturated fats, which can protect you from heart disease and help you stay full without consuming too many calories or carbohydrates. One quarter cup of almonds contains 11 grams of fat, and 7 grams of that fat is monounsaturated. Almonds are also a great source of quality protein. There are 6 grams of protein and 170 calories in a quarter cup serving. Perhaps most importantly, almonds are fairly low in carbohydrates. That same quarter cup serving contains just 7 grams of carbohydrates. On top of this, almonds are also a great source of dietary fiber, providing 4.5 grams of soluble fiber in each quarter cup serving of almonds, which makes these nuts an amazing food for anyone who wants to control their blood sugar and lower their cholesterol. They are also rich in micronutrients. One quarter cup serving of almonds contains the following: Calcium (96 mg) – needed for healthy bones Magnesium (96 mg) – needed for more than 300 enzymatic processes in the body Potassium (262 mg) – beneficial for blood pressure Phosphorus (172 mg) – needed for bone mineralization, energy production and cell signaling Vitamin E (9 mg) – a powerful antioxidant to fight free radicals Overall, almonds are a highly nutritious and super healthy snack to munch on. Differ Continue reading >>

More Proof Of The Benefits Of Almonds For Diabetes Control

More Proof Of The Benefits Of Almonds For Diabetes Control

Two new studies into the potential health benefits of eating almonds have supported evidence that they can help people with type 2 diabetes to maintain their blood glucose and cholesterol levels. One of the studies, published in the journal Metabolism, showed that consuming an ounce of almonds straight before eating a high-starch meal brought a 30 per cent reduction in post-meal glucose levels for patients with type 2 diabetes, compared with a 7 per cent reduction for non-diabetics. In addition, after overnight fasting, patients with type 2 diabetes whose meal contained almonds had a lowering of blood sugar levels after their meal. The effect of regular almond consumption on blood glucose levels for people with type 2 diabetes was also investigated, with the daily consumption of one ounce of almonds over a 12-week period being associated with a 4 per cent reduction in haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and the same reduction in body mass index (BMI). The second study, which was published in Diabetes Care, revealed that nuts such as almonds could help to maintain healthy levels of blood glucose and cholesterol for both men and post-menopausal women who suffer from type 2 diabetes. Karen Lapsley, chief science officer for the Almond Board of California, commented "Those with diabetes are faced with many challenges with their disease management, which is why we are always energized when new research is published that supports our understanding of almonds' role in helping alleviate some of the difficulties." Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Is Almond Oil Healthy For Diabetes

Is Almond Oil Healthy For Diabetes

Published:Sunday, November 22, 2015, 15:03 [IST] Nature has provided humans with some natural gifts in the form of fruits and vegetables. These are laden with the goodness of natural ingredients. These ingredients have their own importance, as they help the human body fight against various types of diseases or ailments. Fruits and vegetables can either be eaten raw or cooked with various cooking processes. Apart from well-known recipes, people have their own ways of cooking them. Fruits and vegetables have been found to be very beneficial when consumed while we are sick. It helps get rid of our sickness faster. One such food item beneficial for diabetic patients is almond oil. Almond oil is extracted from almonds, and that is why it has all the natural properties of almonds. These are basically nuts that can be crushed to get the oil. Regular consumption of this oil can save the users from many known and unknown diseases. If you want know if almond oil is healthy for diabetic patients, you must note that the oil has some natural ingredients that are extremely good in the interest of the treatment of diabetes. As various types of information are available at different sources, you must try to find out how safe is almond oil for diabetes. However, if you wish to get a detailed information of the same, do read the information provided below: Almond Oil is Very Effective for Type Two Diabetic Patients: Type 2 diabetes is known to be more harmful than type 1 diabetes. As per the available medical information, both raw almonds and almond oil are extremely useful for its treatment. Doctors suggest to eat a few nuts after a meal. This can reduce the formation of glucose in the blood. A regular consumption of almond oil can help in reducing the cardiovascular ailments to a grea Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

Almonds For Diabetes

Almonds For Diabetes

Healthy Diet Plans >> Diabetic Diet >> Almonds Almonds are commercially available Almonds are drupes that are extremely beneficial for overall health and well being. Almonds have calcium and magnesium and therefore help prevent a number of diseases. A versatile nut, almonds can be added to any kind of savory dish, salads and fruit mix. Get to know about diet for diabetic patient Almonds for type 2 diabetes is known to be very beneficial because research has shown that consuming almonds after a meal results in a significant reduction in the post meal glucose levels. A spike in the glucose level could aggravate diabetes and lead to cardiovascular diseases. Soaked almonds for diabetes is also beneficial to maintain healthy cholesterol and blood glucose levels of both post menopausal women, as well as men who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Almonds are recommended for those suffering from type 2 diabetes as it provides magnesium and manganese which diabetics are known to be deficient in. Diabetes is a medical condition wherein the individual is known to have a shortfall in the production of insulin or a decrease in the ability of the body to use the insulin hormone. Insulin hormone is essential to allow glucose to be properly utilized by the body cells and then converted into energy required for the various bodily functions. Hence, almonds for diabetic patients are known to be effective because they tend to lower the LDL cholesterol levels, as well as improve the overall insulin sensitivity. Research has shown that the consumption of almonds helps in minimizing resistance to insulin, dull the adverse effects of high blood sugar as well as lower the oxidized LDL cholesterol levels. Almonds are high in healthy monounsaturated fats, protein and fiber. Almond for dia Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Should Munch On Almonds For The Sake Of Their Heart

Why Diabetics Should Munch On Almonds For The Sake Of Their Heart

Diabetes is a major disease affecting the world population today. It is a condition when the blood sugar level in the body shoots up because insulin is not able to break it down into energy. What makes this disease even deadlier is that it is life-long and in the process, it makes the patients more susceptible to fall prey to other diseases - cardiovascular diseases being the perfect case in point. Now of course, we all know that prevention is better than cure, and so it is very important for diabetics to watch what they eat and resort to healthier foods that can keep their heart healthy and keep a check on blood sugar at the same time. There's a habit that most of us follow every morning - eating a handful of almonds that have been soaked in water overnight. Our parents follow it, who have of course learnt it from our grandparents. It's almost like a custom which has been followed across the Indian subcontinent over the years. And for good reason. According to Ayurveda, soaked almonds contain a host of nutrients that are very beneficial for our health. They are a good source of proteins, vitamin E and manganese, which all work towards keeping the heart healthy, strengthening the bones, reducing cholesterol and regulating blood pressure. Health experts also suggest munching on a few almonds in between meals to curb those sudden hunger pangs. They are a great snacking option - no junk and full of goodness. But you should restrict your intake to 8-10 soaked almonds per day, as they are high in monounsaturated fats. Almonds and Heart Health According to a study published in the journal Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, daily consumption of almonds may significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases in Indians with Type 2 diabetes and improve their general Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where the shell does not break apart to release the nuts—these shells have to get broken to free the nut. However, for the sake of this article, the more general use of nuts—those in hard shells that need to be broken (chestnuts and hazelnuts) and other nuts that technically are legumes (like the peanut) and seeds (eg. Pecans, Almonds) are included. Some of the more common nuts are:[1] Hazelnuts/Filberts Brazil nuts Almonds Cashews Chestnuts Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Macadamia nuts Pistachios Coconuts Acorns The USDA’s “Choose My Plate” program designed to help people make healthy eating choices included nuts in the Protein Foods Group, but nuts are high in a number of other nutrients as well, including fiber, the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, healthy omega-3 fats, vitamins and minerals. Nuts are also high in anti-oxidants. One thing to note is that nuts are also high in calories. However, while noting that, it is also important to remember that while you DO want to watch your calories, you are getting an awful lot of healthy nutrition along with those calories and are NOT getting a lot of sugars, cholesterol or unhealthy fats (the sorts of unhealthy saturated fats that can clog up arteries). The way you can get the health benefits of nuts without paying a large “calorie price” is to use nuts a Continue reading >>

Can Unsweetened Almond Milk Help To Lower Blood Glucose?

Can Unsweetened Almond Milk Help To Lower Blood Glucose?

Keeping blood glucose -- or blood sugar -- levels in check means leading a healthy lifestyle, controlling your carb intake and taking medications if your doctor recommends them. Though your body does require carbs daily to function properly, excess carbohydrate consumption can cause spikes in blood sugar. Drinking unsweetened almond milk instead of higher-carb beverages won’t increase your blood sugar as much. Choosing unsweetened almond milk over cow’s milk, sweetened almond milk or regular soy milk can help minimize blood sugar increases. This is because unsweetened almond milk contains less than 1 gram of carbohydrates per cup and will cause little -- if any -- increase in blood sugar. This would be beneficial for people with diabetes, or prediabetes, and anyone who wants to control overall carbohydrate intake to keep blood sugar levels under control. Benefits of Almond Milk Unsweetened almond milk is a low-calorie beverage rich in heart-healthy fats. A cup contains just 30 calories, making it beneficial when you’re trying to shed pounds. In comparison, 1 cup of skim milk contains about 85 calories and 12 grams of carbs, and a cup of unsweetened soy milk provides about 80 calories and 3 grams of carbohydrates. Many types of unsweetened almond milk are fortified with essential vitamins and minerals, such as calcium, zinc, riboflavin and vitamins A, D, B-12 and E. Potential Drawbacks The unsweetened version of almond milk lacks the protein found in cow's and soy milks. While skim and soy milks often contain 7 to 8 grams of dietary protein, unsweetened almond milk provides just 1 gram. Furthermore, since carbohydrates are your body’s preferred source of energy and protein helps boost satiety, drinking unsweetened almond milk may not curb your hunger, unless pair Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

5 Blood Sugar Friendly Diabetic Snacks

5 Blood Sugar Friendly Diabetic Snacks

back to Overview Looking for some snacks that are blood sugar friendly? Health coach and mySugr blogger Markus Berndt shares some of his secrets for taming the snack monster. Diabetic Snack Attack Today is all about diabetic snacks, or snacks that are more blood sugar friendly than your typical carb bombs we often crave. Thankfully we have Markus here to help. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in May of 2012 which catalyzed his devotion to healthy living through diet and exercise. He’s currently a management consultant for workplace health promotion and a health coach. He writes a popular blog (in German) at www.diabetesade.com and contributes regularly to the German side of our website. He has lots of great information to share, and from time to time I’ll do my best to bring a translation to you in English. Over to you, Markus! A Universal Feeling We all experience the urge to snack (if not outright binge) and reward ourselves with culinary delights. The monster is hungry! Finding snacks that are blood sugar friendly can help a lot. Of course, when the urge strikes, we’re not craving health food. Unfortunately, it’s usually the common snack foods, which, by the way, are designed to addict us. It’s a vicious cycle that can be really hard to break free from. So what to do? We don’t want to cave in completely, but constantly nibbling on naked celery isn’t fulfilling either. Finding blood sugar friendly snacks is often really hard. But thankfully there are a few goodies that we can turn to for some satisfaction without needing to feel terribly guilty. These small snacks that, in moderation, will increase your blood sugar a “tolerable” amount and are still really tasty! Some of them I even consider to be miracle products of nature! Walnuts These are cl Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Almonds Almonds provide a healthy, low-carb mix of monounsaturated fats plus magnesium, which is believed to be instrumental in carbohydrate metabolism. A large study out of Harvard University found that high daily magnesium intake reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 33 percent. Therefore, including more magnesium-rich foods like almonds, pumpkin seeds, spinach, and Swiss chard in your diet is a smart move. Continue reading >>

Almonds Can Improve Diabetes Control

Almonds Can Improve Diabetes Control

Two new studies into the potential health benefits of eating almonds have supported evidence that they can help people with type 2 diabetes to maintain their blood glucose and cholesterol levels.… One of the studies, published in the journal, Metabolism, showed that consuming an ounce of almonds straight before eating a high-starch meal brought a 30 per cent reduction in post-meal glucose levels for patients with type 2 diabetes, compared with a 7 per cent reduction for non-diabetics. In addition, after overnight fasting, patients with type 2 diabetes whose meal contained almonds had a lowering of blood sugar levels after their meal. The effect of regular almond consumption on blood glucose levels for people with type 2 diabetes was also investigated, with the daily consumption of one ounce of almonds over a 12-week period being associated with a 4 per cent reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and the same reduction in body mass index (BMI). The second study, which was published in Diabetes Care, revealed that nuts such as almonds could help to maintain healthy levels of blood glucose and cholesterol for both men and post-menopausal women who suffer from type 2 diabetes. Karen Lapsley, chief science officer for the Almond Board of California, commented “Those with diabetes are faced with many challenges with their disease management, which is why we are always energized when new research is published that supports our understanding of almonds’ role in helping alleviate some of the difficulties.” Diabetes UK, Diabetes Care, Oct. 2011 Continue reading >>

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