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Is Almond Flour Good For Diabetics

Healthy Baking: Flour Substitutes

Healthy Baking: Flour Substitutes

With a name like "all-purpose," it's no wonder basic white flour can keep bakers in a one-type rut. But when other options offer both good taste and better nutrition, there's no reason to stick with only one flour variety. See how whole grain flours, whole wheat flours, and gluten-free flours can work for you. With a name like "all-purpose," it's no wonder basic white flour can keep bakers in a one-type rut. But when other options offer both good taste and better nutrition, there's no reason to stick with only one flour variety. See how whole grain flours, whole wheat flours, and gluten-free flours can work for you. With a name like "all-purpose," it's no wonder basic white flour can keep bakers in a one-type rut. But when other options offer both good taste and better nutrition, there's no reason to stick with only one flour variety. See how whole grain flours, whole wheat flours, and gluten-free flours can work for you. With a name like "all-purpose," it's no wonder basic white flour can keep bakers in a one-type rut. But when other options offer both good taste and better nutrition, there's no reason to stick with only one flour variety. See how whole grain flours, whole wheat flours, and gluten-free flours can work for you. Continue reading >>

Almond Flour | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Almond Flour | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnosed with type 2 in Jan my Dr and nurse say I am unusual as I had no symptoms but my question is can we use almond flour and if so dies anyone recommend any recipes. You can use almond flour of course. In fact, it's actually recommended as an alternative to grain flour due to its lower overall carbohydrate content. Less carbs generally means better BG control - and this is especially true for a T2D. I cannot offer you any recipes I'm afraid as I have never baked with almond flour; flaked almonds on top of my bakewell tarts are about as close as it gets There are a fair amount of recipes containing almonds as replacement for normal flour, that pop up on the forum from time to time. Here's an example of various combinations from @Robbity which received a good few likes from the other forum members. Hi Sammie 1. I too was like you had no symptoms of diabetes, but have now been diagnosed only a month ago, (Drs believe. I have been for. 2-3 years, undetected) first I knew was when i was admitted to hospital and ended up having emergency surgery on an infected foot( I stood on a drawing pin, but didn't realise through neuropathy in my feet) Anyway, getting back to your question, on the diabetes's uk website, you can download several cookbooks for free, many of the recipes use almond flour or hazelnut flour. My problem is no one seems to know what it is or where I can get it from. The guy in my local health food shop just stared blankly and shrugged his shoulders. Hi Sammie 1. I too was like you had no symptoms of diabetes, but have now been diagnosed only a month ago, (Drs believe. I have been for. 2-3 years, undetected) first I knew was when i w Continue reading >>

Flour Power: 5 Options That Are Good For Baking And Diabetes

Flour Power: 5 Options That Are Good For Baking And Diabetes

From whole wheat, to spelt, to almond flour, coconut flour, and even flour made from chickpeas, it's hard to know where to start and easy to become confused about which variety is best for your individual needs. With diabetes, you want to select flour that is slow digested, high in fiber, lower in carbohydrate all without a high level of calories to help maintain blood sugar levels as well as promote a healthy body weight. With all that considered, it may seem easy to just throw your hands up in the air, give up, and resign yourself to never baking again. But don’t worry; I am here to help you sort it out and remove the stress from your next grocery store outing. #1. Whole Wheat Pastry Flour If most of your recipes call for all-purpose flour, refined flour that may elevate blood sugar levels more rapidly than whole grains, you may reach for 100% whole wheat flour as an alternative. Although this switch will certainly boost the fiber and whole grain content of your recipe, the taste and texture may not always remain exactly the same. Whole wheat flour (100%) can have a denser, more course texture than all-purpose flour. As a substitute in breads, it can often work out well, but in baked goods such as cookies and muffins, the final product may not taste as close to the original as you had hoped. Enter whole-wheat pastry flour. This flour, which gives graham crackers their sweet taste, is milled from low-protein soft wheat allowing it to provide a flavorful taste to pastries without the density or coarseness of a standard whole-wheat flour. It is best to use for cookies, piecrusts, and baked goods. A 1/3 cup serving size provides 100 calories, 22 grams of carbohydrate, and 4 grams of fiber. #2. Spelt Flour Another alternative to 100% whole-wheat flour is spelt flour. Spe Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Almonds For People With Diabetes

Health Benefits Of Almonds For People With Diabetes

While nuts are generally high in fat and not always considered a good option for low-fat, diabetes-friendly diets, almonds are a special case. Almonds have an especially high concentration of monounsaturated fats or healthy fats which have been associated with reduced risk of heart disease. They also are rich in the antioxidant vitamin E and the minerals magnesium (which improves the flow of blood, oxygen, and nutrients throughout the body) and potassium (which is an important electrolyte involved in nerve transmission and muscle contraction). For people with diabetes, incorporating almonds into meal plans appears to decrease after-meal rises in blood sugar and insulin. Further, eating almonds along with a high-glycemic-index food significantly lowers the glycemic index of the meal and lessens the rise in blood sugar after eating. The rest of the good news is that one study found that replacing 20% of dietary calories with almonds led to improved markers of insulin sensitivity and lower cholesterol levels. Have a handful of almonds as a snack with a piece of fruit. Try almond butter in place of peanut butter on whole-wheat toast or bread. Top salads with almonds that have been lightly toasted in the oven. Chop almonds and add to rice, pasta, or sauted vegetables for added crunch. Use finely chopped almonds in place of bread crumbs on top of baked casseroles. Use unsweetened almond milk in diabetes-friendly shakes, sauces, egg nog , and other recipes. Almond flour (same thing as almond meal ) can be used in many diabetes-friendly recipes. Continue reading >>

Almond Flour Benefits, Almond Flour Recipes & More - Dr. Axe

Almond Flour Benefits, Almond Flour Recipes & More - Dr. Axe

Current: Almond Flour: The Gluten-Free, Heart-Healthy Flour Alternative Almond Flour: The Gluten-Free, Heart-Healthy Flour Alternative Dr. Axe on Facebook2967 Dr. Axe on Twitter64 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest10719 Share on Email Print Article Annie PriceSeptember 3, 2016June 14, 2017 People love almond meal because its a gluten-free flour , andits also a great choice for anyone on a low-carbohydrate diet. If youre a following a paleo diet or looking to bake without grains, almond flour is pretty much amust-have in your pantry as well. This flour is made of almonds and only almonds, which are first blanched to remove the skin and then ground up to a very fine consistency. As we know, almonds nutrition is highly impressive. The awesome thing about almond flour is that its simply ground-up almonds so it gives you all of the original almonds health benefits.One cup of thisflour contains about 90 almonds and provides more than100 percent of the daily requirement for vitamin E. Its super versatile andcan be used in all kinds of baked foods. It packs a potentpunch of nutrition, unlike a typical gluten-rich, overly processed flour that does nothing good for your health. Science has shown that almonds are a natural powerhouse when it comes toheart health, blood sugar management and even some types of cancer.Studies have also foundthat the almonds that make up its namesake flour are even better than complex carbohydrates when it comes to losing weight and maintaining a slimmer waistline. ( 1 ) Lets check out this amazing flour works as a healthierflour option. More than65 percent of the fat in almond flour is monounsaturated, which is excellent for maintaining healthy cholesterol levels and good overall heart health. Addition Continue reading >>

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

When it comes to flours, making the right choice is very important to blood sugar control. So we've gathered some great info here for you to use in your kitchen and menu preparations. Are Grains & Flour Really Good For Fiber? We've often been told that eating whole grains is a great source of fiber. And while ‘whole grains' do provide some fiber they are not the only thing that provide us with our daily fiber needs, vegetables do too. For example: 1 slice of wholewheat bread has 1.9 g of fiber, while a carrot has 2.3 g. All grains and vegetables do range in fiber content, but vegetables are a great source of daily fiber and are also higher in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than grains. So we don't have to eat grains in order to get adequate fiber. Changing A Grain Into A Flour Changes The Way It Affects Blood Sugar Often when we take a grain and make it into flour, it changes the carb and fiber content. So what tends to happen for you as a diabetic is that most types of flours will make your blood sugar spike like wild fire. At least that's what most people experience, which is why our meal plans contain virtually no grain flours at all. An example of this is buckwheat. Eaten whole it has a glycemic index (GI) of around 49, which is a low GI. But take it and turn it into bread and it changes to a GI of 67, meaning it affects your blood sugar more rapidly and more intensely than eating the whole grain itself. Here is another example using wheat. Whole wheat kernals are a very low GI of 30, but we don't tend to eat whole wheat kernals, we eat whole wheat flour and it has an average GI of around 74. Whole Grain Flours Are A Better Option It's true that whole grains are better as far as nutrition goes. As the Minnesota Department of Health explains, the whole grain Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes-friendly Pancake Recipes (low-carb)

7 Diabetes-friendly Pancake Recipes (low-carb)

Someone left a comment on the blog yesterday asking, “Do you have any good recipes for diabetic pancakes?” Before I even had time to answer, another reader asked, “Can diabetics eat pancakes??” Obviously, my answers are “Yes” and “Hell yes!!” Not only can people with diabetes eat regular pancakes if we just take our insulin (or other diabetes medication), it’s also quite easy to make healthy low-carb pancakes that taste amazing and won’t spike your blood sugar. In fact, I have collected 7 Diabetes-Friendly Pancake Recipes right here. Before we get into the recipes, I have to admit that I am not quite sure what “diabetic pancakes” are (can pancakes even get diabetes?) so I will just assume that the question is about pancakes that are good for people with diabetes. To me, that means (relatively) low-carb pancakes with a good amount of protein. And they have to taste GREAT! The last thing we need to discuss before I let you have the pancake recipes is pancake syrup because I think we can all agree that this is an important part of the pancake experience, right? So, can you get “diabetic pancake syrup”? Yes, absolutely. I buy this sugar-free pancake syrup from Walden Farms and it’s good. Great even. It’s the sugar-free product I know off that taste the most like the real thing. Even my husband (who hates the taste of all other sugar substitutes) likes it. Now, let’s get to the fun part and look at my 7 favorite pancake recipes for people with diabetes! Easy Protein Pancakes These easy high-protein pancakes aren’t just simple to make and super healthy, they are also some of the best-looking pancakes if I may say so myself. They are really moist and fluffy, and the blended blueberries give them a great color. Healthy Pumpkin Pancakes My pum Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To Avoid Almond Flour

5 Reasons To Avoid Almond Flour

Almond flour is a little darling of grain free, Paleo/Primal, and low carb baking. It easily rivals conventional flour in its ability to produce tender and fluffy baked goods. Unfortunately, almond flour has numerous detrimental health consequences. It is important to understand these aspects of almond flour, so you can make the decision to avoid almond flour or choose to use almond flour with judicious moderation. 1. Almond flour skews perception about quantity Get this: A cup of almond flour contains about 90 almonds! I calculated that by dividing 640 calories in a cup of almond flour by 7 calories in an almond. Almond flour disguises the consumption of the nuts. For example, this ever-popular Almond Flour Pancake recipe from Elana’s Pantry calls for 1 1/2 cups of almond flour and yields about 4 servings (or 2-3 servings, if you have a hearty pancake appetite). There are about 135 almonds in the entire batch, and 33 almonds per serving (for 4 servings). That’s a lot of almonds to eat in one sitting. If you were chewing the almonds whole, your body would tell you before you consumed this amount, “Okay. I’m full. That’s enough almonds for right now.” As you may know from experience, your body loses that perception and communication when consuming almond flour. 2. Almond flour is very high in inflammatory PUFAS About 20% of the fat in almonds is polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Unfortunately, our modern diets tend to overburden our bodies with polyunsaturated fats which leads to numerous health issues. Here are a few reasons why it is important NOT to go overboard with polyunsaturated fats. PUFAS in suppress mitochondrial energy production. In non-chemistry language, PUFAS slow down the metabolism PUFAS encourage an inflammatory response in the body PUFAS Continue reading >>

Low-carb Flour For Diabetes

Low-carb Flour For Diabetes

Controlling your carbohydrate intake is the best way to optimize your diabetes control. Eating too many carbs at once can make your blood sugar levels go on a roller coaster, making it more difficult for you to manage your diabetes. Foods made from grains and flours, such as bread, pasta, cookies, cakes, muffins, croissants, pies, pancakes and other baked goods, are a huge source of carbohydrates in the standard American diet. Using flours with a lower carbohydrate content can help you enjoy your favorite foods without compromising your blood sugar levels. Video of the Day Coconut flour is made from the coconut meat after most its fat has been extracted to produce coconut oil. Coconut flour has a low carb content and is rich in fiber, in addition to being gluten-free. You will need to modify your recipes to add more liquid as the fiber absorb a lot of water. Each 1/4 cup of coconut flour contains 60 calories, 2.5 g of fat, 6 g of protein, 19 g of carbohydrates and 12 g of fiber. With diabetes, you only need to consider net carbs, which corresponds to the total carbs minus the fiber. Net carbs are the carbs that can raise your blood sugar levels -- fiber cannot. In the case of coconut flour, its net carb content corresponds to 7 g per 1/4-cup serving. In comparison, the same serving of all-purpose wheat flour contains 24 g of carbohydrates and 0.8 g of fiber, or 23.2 g of net carbs; and 1/4 cup of whole-wheat flour has 22 g of carbs and 3.2 g of fiber, or 18.8 g of net carbs. Another simple way to make a low-carb flour that won't make your blood sugar levels shoot above the desirable range is to use almond meal. You can make your own by grinding almonds until you get a fine flour-like consistency. Don't grind for too long or you will get almond butter. You can use almond Continue reading >>

Breading For Meats For Diabetics

Breading For Meats For Diabetics

Tempura and most other breadings are high in carbohydrates. Recipes for breaded meat, fish and poultry often call for flour and other carbohydrate-rich ingredients. If you have diabetes, eating breaded meats could pose a problem for your blood sugar levels. Preparing breaded meat with ingredients that are less likely to disrupt your blood sugar levels is the best way to enjoy breaded foods without negatively impacting your health. Almonds are lower in carbs and contain more fiber and healthy fats compared to wheat flour. You can replace all or part of the white flour in your breading recipe with the same amount of almond meal to get a similar result. You can find almond meal at most health food stores, but you can get a fresher almond meal for less money by grinding almonds yourself until you get a coarse flour-like consistency. An almond breading goes well with white fish and chicken. Parmesan cheese contains no carbohydrates, which means that it doesn't affect your blood sugar levels. You can replace all of the flour in your breading recipe with grated Parmesan cheese, which will create a crispy crust on your meat when cooked. Dip your slices of chicken or meat in beaten eggs before coating them with Parmesan cheese to help the breading stick as much as possible. Coconut flour is made from the white flesh of a coconut and is very low in carbohydrates and high in fiber compared to any whole grain flour. The nutritional profile of coconut flour makes it a great choice for breading meats for people with diabetes. Simply dip shrimp, chicken, fish or meat in beaten eggs before rolling in coconut flour until well coated. You can bake your breaded meat in the oven or lightly fry it in a small amount of coconut oil. Choosing ingredients that have a lower carbohydrate content Continue reading >>

20 Healthy Flours From Lowest To Highest Carbohydrates

20 Healthy Flours From Lowest To Highest Carbohydrates

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE Leave a Comment Whole grain versus flour, and the effect on blood sugar When a grain is in the form of a whole grain, such as a grain of barley, it doesnt have all that much effect on your blood sugar. It moves through your system as a whole grain high in fiber. This means it doesnt break down into smaller particles of sugar in your gastrointestinal system. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. However, when we take a grain and grind it up finely into a flour, we change the way it effects blood sugar. The carbohydrate content goes up, as does the amount of fiber. Every person with diabetes knows how flours made from grains effect their blood sugar. For people with diabetes, flours from grains will cause an increase in blood sugars. Kernels of whole wheat have a low glycemic index. They come in at about 30 on the glycemic index. When whole wheat is milled, it is ground into a fine flour. This causes the glycemic index of wheat flour to be much higher at above 70 on the glycemic index scale. Still with diabetes, whole grains are more optimal for controlling blood sugars. Grains that are refined such as white flours dont contain everything thats needed to be considered whole grain. They have the endosperm, which is the inside layer that contains the carbohydrates, some proteins and some vitamins and minerals. To be a whole grain, the grain must also contain the outside layer of the grain. This layer includes most of the vitamins, is high in fiber, and contains about half of the minerals found in grains. It also needs to contain t Continue reading >>

Baking With Almond Flour

Baking With Almond Flour

Do we have any bakers out there? In the past 5 years, I have grown to love baking. Cookies, cake, bread… you name it, I have baked it! A family member of mine was recently diagnosed with prediabetes. This family member is working hard to make lifestyle changes to slow/prevent the progression of prediabetes to diabetes (that includes avoiding most of my high carb baked goods!). To show my support, I decided to experiment with a favorite recipe: pumpkin muffins. My goal: Modify the original pumpkin muffin recipe to a new, lower carb muffin, while maintaining the overall taste and quality. Could almond flour be the answer? Almond flour is gaining popularity as more people look for a lower carb alternative to all-purpose flour (a common staple in any baker’s pantry). In doing some of my own research, I wanted to find out, could I use almond flour for my pumpkin spice muffins? The original recipe includes the following ingredients: Sour cream Pumpkin puree Brown Sugar Butter All-purpose flour Baking powder Baking soda Salt Ginger Cloves White pepper Raisins (As a personal preference, I usually omit the ginger, cloves, and white pepper, but add extra cinnamon) Carbs in 1 muffin: 52 grams What is almond flour? Almond flour is made from almonds. The almonds are blanched (boiled for a brief time and then placed in cold water to stop the cooking process), then the skin is removed, and finally, the almonds are ground into a fine texture (almond flour). Almond flour is low in carbs and is gluten free, making it a great option for those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance (in addition to those who are carb conscious). Gluten, however, does play an important role in flour, it is the protein that forms when water and flour are mixed together and helps give bread it’s chewy Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Flour For Diabetes?

What Is The Best Flour For Diabetes?

Simply put, all flours are worse than their whole food equivalents. Wholemeal flour or brown rice flour will raise blood sugar, and, if type 2, insulin, just as much as white flour if ground to the same fineness. In fact, whole white rice will raise blood sugar and insulin (or insulin requirement) a lot less than brown rice flour (but still too much). Therefore the best flour is something like almond flour, which being much lower in carbohydrate will dump much less glucose in your blood, while giving you enough energy from fats and protein to assuage hunger. It’s very useful in recipes and is used in most low-carb cookbooks. It’s also a better source of vitamins, minerals, fibre, and whole protein than wholemeal flours. Coconut flour can also be an option. Coconut Flour vs Almond Flour - what you need to understand For some commercial reason it is legal to sell wholemeal products as “wholegrain”, but as we can see this is deceptive. Red Mill has several non-wheat flours available at reasonable prices. If any stores near you carry it, I can attest for their quality. As a baker, I have tried to make an effort to learn and create recipes for several types of people with medical issues. Celiac disease and diabetes have many common recipes, even though the medical problem is vastly different. There's actually quite a lot of diabetic recipe books and online sites with reference materials. Continue reading >>

Best Flour For Diabetics

Best Flour For Diabetics

Diabetics need to be particularly careful on the kind of meals they eat. When it comes to flour, things are no different and that’s why this article has gathered all the necessary information you need to know what kind of flour you should include in your kitchen. Are grains and flour really good for fiber? Every nutritionist will tell you that the greatest source of fiber is the whole grains. We can’t argue on how essential fiber is to the body and in particular the digestive system. But, are whole grains the only source of fiber? Well, the answer is no, you can also get fiber in vegetables too. In fact, in most cases, vegetables have more fiber than the whole grains. For instance, a slice of the whole wheat bread has only 1.9 grams of fiber whereas a carrot has 2.3 grams. As if that isn’t enough, vegetables are also very rich in minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants compared to the whole grains. Meaning you necessarily don’t have to eat grains. What changes when a grain is converted into flour and does it affect the blood sugar differently? Basically, on converting a grain into flour, two things change, the fiber and carb content. As a diabetic on eating meals made from certain flour, this will result in a drastic fatal rise in your blood sugar levels and this is the simple explanation as to why in most cases no grain far is included in most diabetic people meal plans. Taking buckwheat, for instance, it has a low glycemic index of 49 meaning that it won’t cause a drastic rise in your blood sugar levels. On turning the grain into flour and baking a bread the glycemic index raises to 67, this being a clear indication that the composition changed and on consuming the bread it will have severe consequences on your ability to manage your blood sugar levels. Another Continue reading >>

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