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Is 8.8 A High Blood Sugar Level

Blood Sugar/glucose Conversion Chart Mmol/l To Mg/dl

Blood Sugar/glucose Conversion Chart Mmol/l To Mg/dl

Blood Sugar/Glucose Conversion Chart mmol/L to mg/dl Synopsis : Table instantly shows mmol/L to mg/dl conversions for converting blood glucose level values, includes printable chart and mmol/L to mg/dl conversion formula. The handy mmol/L to mg/dl conversion table below converts the American blood sugar measurement system of milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) blood glucose values converted to the international standard of millimole per liter (mmol/L). Our conversion charts below lists a broad range of easy to read mmol/L to mg/dl, as well as vice versa mg/dl to mmol/L, measurement comparisons that range in numbers from 0.1 mmol/L (1.80 mg/dL), and scale up to 900.0 mg/dL (50.000 mmol/L). The blood sugar level (blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level) is defined as the measurement of the amount of glucose present in the blood. Glucose is an essential source of energy, our bodies make it, but glucose mostly comes from the food we eat. The international standard way of measuring blood glucose levels is in terms of a molar concentration, measured in mmol/L (millimoles per litre or millimolar, abbreviated mM). In the U.S., Germany and some other countries blood sugar level concentration is measured in mg/dL (milligrams per decilitre). Contour TS blood glucose meter reading 8.4 mmol/L sits next to a white open container of sugar with a spoon in it, the container lid rests near a finger-prick device or lancet. Conversion Formula for Converting mmol/L to mg/dl: Conversion Formula for Converting mg/dl to mmol/L: mmol/L to mg/dl Blood Glucose Conversion Table* *mg/dL measurements shortened to 2 decimal places with no rounding. mg/dl /L to mmol/L Blood Glucose Conversion Table* Continue reading >>

In Mol/l My Blood Sugar Level Is 8.8 Is That Normal?

In Mol/l My Blood Sugar Level Is 8.8 Is That Normal?

In mol/L my blood sugar level is 8.8 is that normal? I'm 18 years old and a female. I ate efore and checked my sugar. I don't have diabetes (not that im aware of) and i checked using my grandmas blood... show more I'm 18 years old and a female. I ate efore and checked my sugar. I don't have diabetes (not that im aware of) and i checked using my grandmas blood level calculator...PLEASE HELP!! What is a random blood sugar test? A random blood sugar test measures your blood sugar at any point in time, not necessarily a certain amount of time after... show more What is a random blood sugar test? A random blood sugar test measures your blood sugar at any point in time, not necessarily a certain amount of time after a meal, snack or beverage. What's normal? A normal random blood sugar result is lower than 100 mg/dL. What level suggests prediabetes? If your random blood sugar level is higher than 100 mg/dL but lower than 199 mg/dL, you may have prediabetes. What level suggests type 1 or type 2 diabetes? A random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL or higher suggests either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Remember, your blood sugar level alone isn't enough to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Your doctor may do other tests to determine which type of diabetes you have. A non-diabetic's blood sugar (glucose) level, 2 hours after eating, would not normally rise above 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/l). I say normally as there are... show more A non-diabetic's blood sugar (glucose) level, 2 hours after eating, would not normally rise above 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/l). I say normally as there are occasions when blood sugar levels could go higher, such as if you were suffering an underlying infection at the time of testing; you were going through a period of extreme stress at the time of testi Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes does not increase the risk of birth defects or the risk that the baby will be diabetic at birth. Also called gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), this type of diabetes affects between 3% and 20% of pregnant women. It presents with a rise in blood glucose (sugar) levels toward the end of the 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy. In 90% if cases, it disappears after the birth, but the mother is at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Cause It occurs when cells become resistant to the action of insulin, which is naturally caused during pregnancy by the hormones of the placenta. In some women, the pancreas is not able to secrete enough insulin to counterbalance the effect of these hormones, causing hyperglycemia, then diabetes. Symptoms Pregnant women generally have no apparent diabetes symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms occur: Unusual fatigue Excessive thirst Increase in the volume and frequency of urination Headaches Importance of screening These symptoms can go undetected because they are very common in pregnant women. Women at risk Several factors increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes: Being over 35 years of age Being overweight Family members with type 2 diabetes Having previously given birth to a baby weighing more than 4 kg (9 lb) Gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Belonging to a high-risk ethnic group (Aboriginal, Latin American, Asian or African) Having had abnormally high blood glucose (sugar) levels in the past, whether a diagnosis of glucose intolerance or prediabetes Regular use of a corticosteroid medication Suffering from ancanthosis nigricans, a discoloration of the skin, often darkened patches on the neck or under the arms Screening The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Gui Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

How Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

How Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

When you have diabetes, your blood sugar (glucose) levels may be consistently high. Over time, this can damage your body and lead to many other problems. How much sugar in the blood is too much? And why is high glucose so bad for you? Here’s a look at how your levels affect your health. They're less than 100 mg/dL after not eating (fasting) for at least 8 hours. And they're less than 140 mg/dL 2 hours after eating. During the day, levels tend to be at their lowest just before meals. For most people without diabetes, blood sugar levels before meals hover around 70 to 80 mg/dL. For some people, 60 is normal; for others, 90. What's a low sugar level? It varies widely, too. Many people's glucose won't ever fall below 60, even with prolonged fasting. When you diet or fast, the liver keeps your levels normal by turning fat and muscle into sugar. A few people's levels may fall somewhat lower. Doctors use these tests to find out if you have diabetes: Fasting plasma glucose test. The doctor tests your blood sugar levels after fasting for 8 hours and it’s higher than 126 mg/dL. Oral glucose tolerance test. After fasting for 8 hours, you get a special sugary drink. Two hours later your sugar level is higher than 200. Random check. The doctor tests your blood sugar and it’s higher than 200, plus you’re peeing more, always thirsty, and you’ve gained or lost a significant amount of weight. He’ll then do a fasting sugar level test or an oral glucose tolerance test to confirm the diagnosis. Any sugar levels higher than normal are unhealthy. Levels that are higher than normal, but not reaching the point of full-blown diabetes, are called prediabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, 86 million people in the U.S. have this condition, which can lead to diabetes Continue reading >>

Understanding A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis

Understanding A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis

Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a manageable condition. Once you’re diagnosed, you can learn what to do to stay healthy. Diabetes is grouped into different types. The most commonly diagnosed are gestational diabetes, type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Maybe you have a friend who was told she had diabetes during pregnancy. That type is called gestational diabetes. It can develop during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born. Type 1 Diabetes You may have had a childhood friend with diabetes who had to take insulin every day. That type is called type 1 diabetes. The peak age of onset is in the midteens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 1 makes up 5 percent of all cases of diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes makes up 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, according to the CDC. It is also called adult-onset diabetes. Although it can occur at any age, it’s more common in people older than 40. If you think you might have diabetes, talk to your doctor. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can cause severe complications, such as: amputation of the legs and feet blindness heart disease kidney disease stroke According to the CDC, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. People with diabetes are 1.5 times as likely to die as people of the same age who don’t have diabetes. Many of the severe side effects of diabetes can be avoided with treatment. That’s why it’s so important to be diagnosed as soon as possible. Some people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they have symptoms. Early diabetes symptoms include: increased or frequent urination increased thirst fatigue cuts or sores that won Continue reading >>

Shock At Sugar Reading

Shock At Sugar Reading

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hello. I don't know if I'm pre diabetic or diabetic type 2. I have to go to the hospital for check ups every four months because I had a kidney transplant eleven years ago. My doctor there said my blood test are fine and I'm not prediabetic but my GP said I am. I took my blood test this morning two hours after a small slice of farmhouse toast with butter and jam one sugar in my tea and it was 8.8 that is high dont you think if your not a diabetic or even for a pre-diabetic person. Took my blood sugar yesterday two hours after small slice of farmhouse bread and bacon and it was 6.6 just shows how sugar makes so much difference. I really don't know who to believe or take notice of, Dr at hospital or My GP. What was the reading that made your doc say you were diabetic? Your surgery should provide you with a print out of your results, if you ask. Also, how long after eating did you test to get the 6.6 and 8.8 readings. They are certainly not outside 'normal' non-d readings, but it all depends on timing. Non diabetics can reach as high as 11mmol/l after food (depending on what that food is), but the key factor is that they don't stay that high for as long as a diabetic would. there is nothing wrong with either of those numbers in isolation that would drive any doctor to say you are diabetic. 8.8 can be perfectly normal (especially in the morning) and 6.6 after having bacon may just mean you haven't peaked yet due to the fat. I suggest you do an experiment: Eat a meal and test before and every 15/20 mins after for the next 3 to 4 hours and then have a look at the profile but I expect you will find nothing out of the ordinary. What was the reading that made Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

What Your Blood Glucose Numbers Mean

What Your Blood Glucose Numbers Mean

In order to get a complete picture of your blood glucose throughout the day, it is useful to test at different times. Your doctor will help you set your blood glucose targets. Here is what the numbers can mean. These examples are based upon the American Diabetes Association guidelines. Fasting blood glucose before breakfast. This reading on an empty stomach shows how well you use the long-acting insulin that you take. The number should be between 4 and 7 mmol/L. Pre-meal blood glucose before lunch and dinner. This reading shows the effectiveness of your breakfast and lunch insulin doses. The number should be between 4 and 7. Two hours after eating. Your blood glucose peaks a few hours after you eat. This reading shows if the insulin you took was enough to cover the carbs you ate. The reading should be less than 10 mmol/L. Just before bedtime. A target range for someone with diabetes is 6 to 8 mmol/L. You don't want to go to bed with blood glucose that is too low, because that puts you at risk of having a severe low blood sugar episode during the night. Blood Glucose Level Ask Your Doctor If your blood glucose before breakfast is lower than 4 mmol/L, that may be too low. Ask your doctor if you should eat a small snack before you go to bed or reduce your bedtime dose of long-acting insulin. You might want to do a 3:00 am blood glucose check. If the reading before breakfast is over 7 mmol/L, and several 3:00 am readings are in your target range, you may be experiencing "Dawn Phenomenon". This happens when levels of growth hormone begin to rise in the early morning hours, stimulating the liver to release glucose into the bloodstream. Ask your doctor if your supper or bedtime NPH insulin dose needs to be increased, or if you would do better using a different type of insulin. Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c, often abbreviated HbA1c, is a form of hemoglobin (a blood pigment that carries oxygen) that is bound to glucose. The blood test for HbA1c level is routinely performed in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Blood HbA1c levels are reflective of how well diabetes is controlled. The normal range for level for hemoglobin A1c is less than 6%. HbA1c also is known as glycosylated, or glycated hemoglobin. HbA1c levels are reflective of blood glucose levels over the past six to eight weeks and do not reflect daily ups and downs of blood glucose. High HbA1c levels indicate poorer control of diabetes than levels in the normal range. HbA1c is typically measured to determine how well a type 1 or type 2 diabetes treatment plan (including medications, exercise, or dietary changes) is working. How Is Hemoglobin A1c Measured? The test for hemoglobin A1c depends on the chemical (electrical) charge on the molecule of HbA1c, which differs from the charges on the other components of hemoglobin. The molecule of HbA1c also differs in size from the other components. HbA1c may be separated by charge and size from the other hemoglobin A components in blood by a procedure called high pressure (or performance) liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC separates mixtures (for example, blood) into its various components by adding the mixtures to special liquids and passing them under pressure through columns filled with a material that separates the mixture into its different component molecules. HbA1c testing is done on a blood sample. Because HbA1c is not affected by short-term fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations, for example, due to meals, blood can be drawn for HbA1c testing without regard to when food was eaten. Fasting for the blood test is not necessary. What Are Continue reading >>

I Am Currently 28 Weeks Pregnant And Had The Blood Glucose Test Done This Past Week But I Have Not Received The Results Yet. I Used My Husbands Glucose Meter To Check The Other Day Because I Wasnt Feeling Well, And I Think It Was High (159 Mg/dl [8.8 Mmol/l] One Hour After Eating). What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels Should Be For Someone Without Gestational Diabetes? When Is The Best Time And Way To Check Myself?

I Am Currently 28 Weeks Pregnant And Had The Blood Glucose Test Done This Past Week But I Have Not Received The Results Yet. I Used My Husbands Glucose Meter To Check The Other Day Because I Wasnt Feeling Well, And I Think It Was High (159 Mg/dl [8.8 Mmol/l] One Hour After Eating). What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels Should Be For Someone Without Gestational Diabetes? When Is The Best Time And Way To Check Myself?

I am currently 28 weeks pregnant and had the blood glucose test done this past week but I have not received the results yet. I used my husbands glucose meter to check the other day because I wasnt feeling well, and I think it was high (159 mg/dl [8.8 mmol/L] one hour after eating). What are normal blood sugar levels should be for someone without gestational diabetes? When is the best time and way to check myself? There is some variation on the criteria for a one hour glucose screening test, but the value I use is less than 135mg/dl [7.5 mmol/L]. If you exceed this value, then it is necessary to do a three-hour test. The criteria are fasting less than 95 mg/dl [5.3 mmol/L], one hour less than 180 mg/dl [10 mmol/L], two-hour less than 155 mg/dl [8.6 mmol/L], three-hour less than 140 mg/dl [7.8 mmol/L]. Morning fasting glucose should be 70-90 mg/dl [3.9-5 mmol/L], and one hour after a meal it should less than 130 mg/dl [7.2 mmol/L] or less than 120 mg/dl [6.7 mmol/L] at two hours. Thus, your value of 159 mg/dl [8.8 mmol/L] is certainly concerning. However, it takes formal testing to make a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. The usual times for testing are upon waking in the morning and just before and either one or two hours after meals. Continue reading >>

What Should My Blood Glucose Levels Be?

What Should My Blood Glucose Levels Be?

Everybody is different, and everybody's blood glucose management will be different, so it's important to check with your doctor about the levels you should aim for. But, there are general blood glucose ranges that you can use as guidelines. Blood-glucose levels are measured in units called mmol/L (pronounced milli-moles-per-litre). The ideal ranges are: Before meals: 4-7 mmol/L Two hours after meals: 8-9 mmol/L At bedtime: 6-10 mmol/L You may need to consult your doctor and change your treatment plan if: Blood glucose is consistently lower than 4 mmol/L or higher than 10 mmol/L before meals Blood glucose is consistently lower than 6 mmol/L or higher than 12 mmol/L at bedtime Blood glucose goals may be modified for children and others who are at greater risk of hypoglycaemia In the US blood glucose levels are measured in mg/dl (milligrams per deciliter). That’s why you’ll occasionally read about blood glucose readings that seem very high, like 140 or 220. To convert the American scores back to mmol/L, just divide the number by 18. How often should I be checking my blood glucose levels? Checking the level of glucose in your blood and keeping a record of the levels is an important part of taking care of your type 1 diabetes. This allows you to identify the patterns of high or low blood glucose levels. The information will also help you and your doctor or diabetes team to balance food, exercise and insulin doses. Ideally you should aim to do at least four blood glucose checks a day, although some people do many more. To get the most out of monitoring, your healthcare team may advise you to check your blood glucose levels before and then two to three hours after food. It’s also a good idea to monitor before, during and after exercise. If your blood glucose level is hig Continue reading >>

Why Do I Have High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning?

Why Do I Have High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning?

Some people experience very high blood sugar levels in the morning. But what implications does this have for a person's health? There are two main causes of high blood sugar in the morning, the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect This article explores these two causes of high blood sugar levels in the morning. It also discusses what risk factors may cause people to experience them and gives practical advice around how to better manage blood sugar levels. Contents of this article: The dawn phenomenon The dawn phenomenon has to do with natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle: Midnight - 3 a.m. While most people are sleeping, their body has little need for insulin. During this period, however, any insulin that may have been taken during the evening causes the blood sugar levels to drop off drastically. Between 3 - 8 a.m. The body automatically begins to dish out stored sugar (glucose) in preparation for the upcoming day. In addition, hormones that actively reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin are also being released. During this time period, counter-regulatory hormones are being released. This can interfere with insulin, which may lead to a rise in blood sugar. These include growth hormones, such as: cortisol glucagon epinephrine These events are all happening simultaneously as bedtime levels of insulin are beginning to taper off. Each of these events ultimately plays a part in causing blood sugar levels to rise at "dawn" or in the morning. Who the dawn phenomenon affects Although people with diabetes are generally more aware of the dawn phenomenon, it actually happens to everyone. However, it affects people with or without diabetes differently. Typically, people who do not have diabetes tend not to notice these high blood sugar levels in the morning. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose

Blood Glucose

Blood glucose and blood sugar are interchangeable terms, and both are crucial to the health of the body; especially for people with diabetes. Most diabetics will be familiar with the terms blood glucose, blood glucose test, blood glucose level and blood glucose meter, but what does blood glucose really mean? Why do blood sugar levels need to be controlled? What are blood glucose levels? Blood sugar levels are literally the amount of glucose in the blood, sometimes called the serum glucose level. Usually, this amount is expressed as millimoles per litre (mmol/l) and stay stable amongst people without diabetes at around 4-8mmol/L. Spikes in blood sugar will occur following meals, and levels will usually be at their lowest in the early mornings. When it comes to people with diabetes, blood sugar fluctuates more widely. Why do blood glucose levels need to be controlled? High levels of glucose present in the blood over a sustained period of time end up damaging the blood vessels. Although this does not sound too serious, the list of resultant complications is. Poorly controlled blood glucose levels can increase your chances of developing diabetes complications including nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases. The time-scale for the development of these complications is usually years, but be aware that type 2 diabetes is often not diagnosed until a relatively late stage. How do I find out what my blood glucose levels are? You can use home testing kits, although before doing so read our guide to blood glucose monitors. Measure levels by putting a drop of blood on a strip and placing it into a BGM (blood glucose meter). Prick your finger with a specially designed lancet to draw blood. What is a good blood glucose level? NICE guidelines for the UK curre Continue reading >>

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