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Is 210 Sugar Level High

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to blood sugar levels, the numbers always seem to confuse people. So we're here today to cover a whole range of reader questions that have come in. If you have questions of your own, join the discussion – please feel free to leave your comments at the bottom. Healthy blood sugar goal ranges Healthy blood sugar control values will depend on several factors, the most important being when you check it. Blood glucose levels will rise after eating meals regardless of whether a person has diabetes–however, someone with good control will be able to bring it down to a stable level after 2 hours. The diagnostic values below are for non pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Ranges are different for children, those with type I diabetes and pregnant women. FASTING AFTER MEALS 2 HOURS HbA1c Normal 70-99 mg/dL (4-6 mmol/L)* <140 mg/dL (<7.8 mmol/L)** <5.7% Pre-Diabetes 100-125 mg/dL (6.1-6.9 mmol/L) 140-179 mg/dL 5.7-6.4% Diabetes >126 mg/dL (>7 mmol/L) >180 mg/dL 6.5% and higher *Note that different agencies establish different standards. Some range 70-100 mg/dL, some 70-110 mg/dL, some 70-130 mg/dL **Some agencies recommend <180 mg/dL post-meal especially in the elderly and those who have had diabetes for a very long time What should your goals be? That is between you and your healthcare team because it does depend on various factors. But overall your goal is to gain good control of your diabetes, which means maintaining normal levels or getting as close to normal levels as possible (refer to the normal numbers above). We’ve answered some specific questions regarding blood sugar over here, so be sure to check those out as well. Some specific comments and questions we’ve received regarding blood sugar levels include: 1. My post meal is hovering around 140-160, Continue reading >>

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death. However, hyperglycemia, high-blood sugar levels consistently above 240 mg/dL, can be just as dangerous. Left untreated, at its most extreme high-blood sugar, can induce ketoacidosis, the build-up of toxic-acid ketones in the blood and urine. It can also bring on nausea, weakness, fruity-smelling breath, shortness of breath, and, as with hypoglycemia, coma. However, once they’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, most type 2s have taken steps to prevent or lessen the most dangerous effects of high-blood sugar levels. Their concern shifts to dealing with unexpected, sometimes alarming spikes in blood sugar levels. The symptoms of those spikes are the classic ones we associate with the onset of diabetes—unquenchable thirst, excessive urination, fatigue, weight loss, and headaches. When you do spike, what can you do right away to bring blood sugar levels down? Immediate Steps You Can Take: 1. Insulin—If you are on an insulin regimen; a bolus injection should drive numbers down fairly rapidly. 2. If you are not on insulin or don’t use fast-acting insulin, taking a brisk walk or bike ride works for most people to start bringing their numbers down. 3. Stay hydrated. Hyperglycemic bodies want to shed excess sugar, leading to frequent urination and dehydration. You need to drink water steadily until your numbers drop. 4. Curb your carb intake. It does not matter how complex the carbs in your diet are, your body still converts them to glucose at some point. Slacking off on carb consumption is a trackable maneuver that lets you better understand how to control your numbers. Preventative Steps: These are extensions Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 210 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 210 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 210 mg/dl after eating? (or 11.65mmol/l) Blood sugar 210 mg/dl (11.65mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 210 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 70mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones s Continue reading >>

4 December 2012why Is My Blood Glucose So High When I Wake Up?

4 December 2012why Is My Blood Glucose So High When I Wake Up?

It doesn't seem fair, does it? You haven't eaten anything all night and you still wake up with high blood glucose! What is going on and how can you lower it? For those of you with diabetes, this post is for you! Basics Your body strives to keep blood glucose (BG) within a safe range, but with diabetes the balance is disturbed. The insulin your pancreas produces might not be sufficient to cover your BG lowering needs. As well, the insulin it does produce might not be handled properly by target body cells. And to make matters worse, your liver might be on glucose production overdrive. All of this results in your body's failure to control BG overnight as well as after meals or snacks. For more basic information about diabetes, please be sure to read my article, Diabetes Basics at MyNetDiary's library. Dawn Phenomenon Due to normal daily changes in our body's release of hormones during sleep and wake cycles, BG typically starts to rise in the very early morning – starting about 3 AM - and continues to rise as the morning progresses. For folks without diabetes, insulin production simply increases and takes care of the rising BG. However, for folks with diabetes, unless there is medication on board to cover this early morning rise, BG will eventually rise out of target range by the time they wake up. The classic pattern is to see BG within target range at both bedtime and during the middle of the night, and then see a high fasting BG. If you have noticed that your fasting BG is creeping up over time and is no longer within target range despite sticking to a carb controlled eating plan and taking your diabetes medication as prescribed, then it might be time to talk with your doctor about your diabetes medication. The type, dose, and/or timing might need to be adjusted to bet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Level And Charts

Diabetes Blood Sugar Level And Charts

How to understand you have diabetes from the blood sugar level readings? What are the tests to perform for monitoring blood glucose? How are sugar levels related to risk for heart disease? Diabetes blood sugar level is obtained when you perform a blood sugar test, and it is of most value especially when diabetes symptoms are noticed. The most important thing is to learn how to correctly measure your blood glucose levels and carefully interpret the results by your own. If you find any difficulty, go and pay a visit to your doctor. How to recognize if you have diabetes? No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more If the results you get are > 200 mg/dl, you are in a dangerous zone. Diabetes complications, heart stroke or even death are one step from you. Be careful! I am just emphasizing the importance of your current health situation. At the same time, you can take total control of blood sugar through simple and natural steps. They include lifestyle and dietary strategies changes that can give you a hand in lowering high sugar in blood and beating diabetes naturally. There is another natural alternative which can help you stabilize your high glucose levels. Click here to see how. Another important fact is to have a good understanding of what a normal sugar level is, what the range for your case as a diabetic is, and how far you can achieve it. Diabetes blood sugar level - Understanding the tests The tests you need to perform are pretty easy. You may also try them at home through a practical home-testing kit and have the results whenever and wherever you want. However, you must also learn how to read the results by yourself correctly. Keep in mind that your testing results Continue reading >>

What Is Considered A High Blood Sugar Level For A Diabetic?

What Is Considered A High Blood Sugar Level For A Diabetic?

Without diabetes, your blood sugar should stay within the range of 70 to 120 milligrams per deciliter. But if you are diagnosed with diabetes, a more normal range for you may be between 80 and 180 milligrams per deciliter, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Clearly, anything outside of this range is dangerous for a diabetic, and when it gets to a certain level, you may require immediate medical attention. Video of the Day Anytime blood sugar is more than 240 milligrams per deciliter, it’s a cause for concern among diabetics. It is particularly dangerous if your sugar is this high before a meal, since consuming any food would probably cause it to rise even more. When your blood glucose is above 240 milligrams per deciliter, it means your system isn’t getting the energy it needs from glucose and could start breaking down fats. Your body starts producing ketones, which stem from fat deconstruction, possibly putting you into ketoacidosis that could lead to a diabetic coma. If your blood sugar surges to over 300 milligrams per deciliter, contact your physician immediately, since it could be life-threatening. Continue reading >>

New Research On High Glucose Levels

New Research On High Glucose Levels

American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines advise “lowering A1C to below or around 7%” and postprandial (after-meal) glucose levels to 180 mg/dl or below. But new research shows that these glucose levels damage blood vessels, nerves, organs, and beta cells. An article by diabetes blogger Jenny Ruhl analyzes at what blood glucose level organ damage starts. According to Ruhl, research shows that glucose can do harm at much lower levels than doctors had thought. This news could be discouraging or even terrifying. If it’s hard to meet your current glucose goals, how will you reach tighter goals? Such news might make some people give up. But remember, a high postprandial or fasting reading won’t kill you. All we know is that higher numbers correlate with higher chances of complications. You have time to react. In fact, we could choose to look at this as good news. We all know of people who developed complications despite “good control.” But complications are not inevitable; it’s just that so-called “good control” wasn’t really all that good. First, the numbers. “Post-meal blood sugars of 140 mg/dl [milligrams per deciliter] and higher, and fasting blood sugars over 100 mg/dl [can] cause permanent organ damage and cause diabetes to progress,” Ruhl writes. For nerve damage, University of Utah researchers studied people with painful sensory neuropathy, or nerve damage. They found that participants who did not have diabetes but who had impaired glucose tolerance on an oral glucose tolerance test, or OGTT, (meaning that their glucose levels rose to between 140 mg/dl and 200 mg/dl in response to drinking a glucose-rich drink) were much more likely to have a diabetic form of neuropathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The higher these OGTT num Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels 210

Blood Sugar Levels 210

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF MY BLOOD SUGAR IS 210 ? thank you ... My mother's fasting blood sugar level is 210 constantly for the last two months despite medication. She takes Glador 500 mg twice a day. ... My sugar level is 210 after 2 hrs of breakfast and I am lossing weight WHAT medicine I should take when I take metformin 500 per day it comes to 65 to 78 advice me My pressure is almost normal ... Hello Sir, I recently checked my blood sugar, which was found 210(Before Meal) and 340 (After Meal). Kindly suggest some mediciene and food to avoid and intake ro reduce the blood sugar level. Thanks ... was diagonised with type B diabetics since last 3 years. my fasting sugars is always high (above 210) even after ... . Recently doctor asked me to change it to glycomet gp2 . But the sugar levels are 120 before and 210 after ... much carmel corn apparently. When I had my episode the next morning and I went to the ER my blood sugar was 500. Could my high blood sugar levels have instigated this episode or was that a coincidence? ... Why is one foot swelled up and red after eating and relaxing and I have blood pressure readings of 166/107 I m a veteran and just had a fasting lab analysis of my blood and everything except my blood ... HI DR. THIS QUESTION FOR MY BROTHER, IN HIS MEDICAL REPORT ALT (sGPT) LEVEL SHOWING 210 ... WILL REDUCE THE LEVEL? ... sir,my wife 28 yrs old.she is having fasting sugar level 122, gtt report after 1 hr-210,after 2hr ....now my question is in this situation high blood sugar is safe for baby. ... 210 2 hours after meal.. I take 1 metfomin 500mg at night just last 3 days since diagnosed a diabetic. Should I wait for some more time to add another pill (which doctor said I might need ... I am having blood sugar fasting 145 and pp 210. sugar i am having last Continue reading >>

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

High Sugar Level in Just One Week! How I Lowered My Diabetic High Blood Sugar From 399 mg/dl to 112 mg/dl in Just One Week! UPDATE: In January of 2017 I weighed 215 pounds. Today is June 7th and I weighed 150.2 today!!! Amen! I've lost 65 pounds in just a few months!!! Here's a ukulele video I made last month, showing before and after. My sugar last year was 399 mg/dl, but is now 75 mg/dl. My mmol/L was 9.8 last year, but was 6.7 two months ago when I weighed 185. My doctor said my diabetes is all GONE! I've lost another 35 pounds and am now 150 pounds. I'll get my glucose tested again in a couple weeks, which should be 5 point something. My friend, LOSE WEIGHT if you want to get rid of the type II diabetes. I explain in the video and notes how I lost so much weight. I DIDN'T take any diabetes drugs!!! I DIDN'T take any pills or follow anyone's quack diet plan. I simply limited my daily calories to 1,000 or less, and walked a couple hours a day, here a little and there a little. Drink only water. Eat big salads (with hardly any dressing) and stay away from processed and breaded foods. Eat tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, AND FAST A DAY OR TWO EACH WEEK, eating nothing! Don't let people tell you it's unhealthy to eat under 1,000 calories a day. It depends what you're eating. Losing your feet to diabetes is MUCH WORSE! Americans are plagued with “SITTING DISEASE,” sedentary, gluttons and lazy. If you are type II diabetic, like me, this may perhaps be the most important article you ever read concerning your health. I can help you tremendously! I have nothing to sell. I am a born-again Christian and I want to help as many people as I can. You'll love me after reading this article if you have type II diabetes. But before I begin, please understand that I am not a profession Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of High Blood Sugar Levels?

What Are The Side Effects Of High Blood Sugar Levels?

High blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, occurs when the body has too little insulin, or cannot use it properly. Common causes of high blood sugar include overeating, under-exercising and emotional stress. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), hyperglycemia is a major cause of complications for people diabetes. If you experience frequent or extreme symptoms of high blood sugar, seek guidance from your doctor. Video of the Day Frequent urination is a common symptom of high blood sugar. Urinating more frequently or producing greater urine volume than usual, regardless of how much fluid you've consumed, is often a first recognized symptom of diabetes. When blood sugar increases, compounds known as ketones may develop in the body. Urine test strips provide a means of testing ketone levels at home. According to the ADA, exercise can lower blood sugar. However, if you know that your blood sugar is high and your ketone level is high, exercise may further elevate blood sugar. Reducing your food intake may also help manage your blood sugar. If you have not been tested for, or diagnosed with, diabetes and experience on-going frequent urination, discuss your symptoms with your doctor. Unexplained increases in thirst and hunger may indicate high blood sugar. According to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC), dry mouth and increased thirst are common first symptoms of ketoacidosis, a condition also known as diabetic coma. Ketoacidosis occurs when the body lacks insulin and cannot utilize glucose as fuel. The body breaks down fats to use as energy, which causes ketone production. Too many ketones cause build-up, the precursor to ketoacidosis. People with diabetes often recognize the symptoms of high blood sugar, such as thirst, before ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

When Blood Sugar Is Too High

When Blood Sugar Is Too High

Glucose , or sugar, is the body's main fuel source. That means your body including your brain needs glucose to work properly. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia(say: hi-per-gly-SEE-me-uh) is the medical word for high blood sugar levels. The hormone insulin is supposed to control the level of glucose in the blood. But someone with diabetes doesn't make enough insulin or the insulin doesn't work properly so too much sugar can get into the blood and make the person sick. If you have high blood sugar levels, you may need treatment to lower your blood sugar. Your parents and your diabetes health care team will tell you what your blood sugar levels should be and what to do if they get too high. Managing diabetes is like a three-way balancing act because you have to watch: the medicines you take (insulin or pills) All three need to be balanced. If any one of these is off, blood sugar levels can be, too. Your parents and doctor can help you with this balancing act. In general, higher than normal blood glucose levels can be caused by: not taking your diabetes medicine when you're supposed to or not taking the right amounts eating more food than your meal plan allows (without adjusting your insulin or diabetes pills) taking other kinds of medicines that affect how your diabetes medicines work Keeping blood sugar levels close to normal can be hard sometimes, and nobody's perfect. Grown-ups can help you stay in balance if you have diabetes. Sometimes blood sugar levels can be high because you're growing and your doctor needs to make some changes in your diabetes treatment plan. pee a lot. When blood sugar levels get too high, the kidneys flush out the extra glucose into your urine (pee), which is why people who Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Types of Diabetes The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

My Family History of Diabetes Diabetes has been in my family for generations. My grandmother was a diabetic, my father is diabetic, and during my pregnancy I almost developed prenatal diabetes. Given my family history and my own personal experience, I've learned a lot about this condition over the years. It turns out that there are many things we can do to control our blood sugar though the foods we eat. Normal Blood Glucose Levels What are normal blood glucose levels? Before meals: 80-90 mg/dL After meals: Up to 120 mg/dL Keep in mind that the blood glucose level before a meal for a non-diabetic and a prediabetic person may be very similar. As you can see in the graph below, how your blood sugar fluctuates after eating a meal can be more telling than your pre-meal glucose levels. However, if your pre-meal glucose level is over 100 mg/dL, you should see a doctor. A fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL is considered diabetic. In this article, you will learn about the progression of Type 2 diabetes and how you can reverse it. Understanding the Diagnosis If you are reading this, you probably have been told by your doctor that you have, or someone you care about has, diabetes or prediabetes. You may be surprised, shocked, or even scared. You wonder how and why this is happening. Basically, diabetes means that the level of glucose in your blood (or blood sugar) is too high. Everyone has glucose in his or her blood. We need it to provide energy for all the cells in our body. Having diabetes means you have more than you need, way above normal blood sugar levels. The diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat arbitrary and keeps changing over time. Some time ago, your fasting glucose levels had to be 140 mg/dL or higher to be considered diabetic. Today the official number is 126 mg/dL, an Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Who Gets Diabetes and How to Manage It Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. Several factors, such as body weight, family history and race and ethnicity may increase your risk of diabetes. Diabetes can be effectively managed by exercising and eating a healthy diet. What is diabetes? Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated—or poorly managed—it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. Your body and sugar To understand diabetes, it’s helpful to understand the basics of how your body metabolizes (breaks down) sugar. Most of the cells in your body need sugar as a source of energy. When you eat carbohydrates, such as a bowl of pasta or some vegetables, your digestive system breaks the carbohydrates down into simple sugars such as glucose, which travel into and through your bloodstream to nourish and energize cells. A key player in the breakdown of sugar is the pancreas, a fish-shaped gland behind your stomach and liver. The pancreas fills two roles. It produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine to help break down the nutrients in your food—proteins, carbohydrates, and fats—to provide sources of energy and building material for the body’s cells. It makes hormones that regulate the disposal of nutrients, including sugars. Cells in Continue reading >>

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