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Is 210 Sugar Level High

My Neighbor's Blood Sugar Is 210! What Can I Do To Instantly Lower It?

My Neighbor's Blood Sugar Is 210! What Can I Do To Instantly Lower It?

My neighbor's Blood Sugar is 210! What can I do to instantly lower it? It's late at night and I can't get him to the doctor until tomorrow. Update: He is 85 and has been lethargic all day after eating 5 or 6 valentines candies for breakfast. I'm a nurse but we live in the boonies. I'll check it in the AM to see if it came down. Update 2: BTW, he is not diagnosed as being a diabetic. But I have a feeling that's going to change... Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Slow down and quit being a drama nurse !!First of all you didn't say when you checked his blood sugar. 210 is high but not critical. And at 85 I don't think he is going to exercise much, so mostly he is just going to have to watch what he eats and start on medication. Metformin to start. For exercise a treadmill would be a good start. Its safer than walkin' around the Boonies. Don't worry. With a blood sugar of 210 he won't be feeling great, but he'll be fine. Don't listen to the people saying that he'll go into a diabetic coma; it would take a loonnngggg time for him to. Just bring him to the doctor tomorrow --- or the emergency room if you can't get an early appointment. If you/he's really worried, you can try exercising, that lowers it. Just taking a jog, walk, etc. And if you're looking for a subtler method, try drinking some water. It won't make a drastic impact like exercise, but it will help a little, and may make him feel better. And if he's on insulin, call the hospital he goes to for checkups, and the'll tell you what to do. Honestly, though, they probably won't tell him to do anything. 210 is NOT dangerous, at least not for a diabetic. Highs happen; the only thing you can usually do is wait for the next injection and raise the dosage. A blood sugar of 210 is NOT AN EMERGENCY! Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is most often seen in people who have diabetes that isn't well controlled. The symptoms of high blood sugar can be mild, moderate, or severe. If your blood sugar levels are consistently 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) to 350 mg/dL, you may have mild symptoms of high blood sugar. You may urinate more than usual if you are drinking plenty of liquids. Some people with diabetes may not notice any symptoms when their blood sugar level is in this range. The main symptoms of high blood sugar are: Young children are unable to recognize symptoms of high blood sugar. Parents need to do a home blood sugar test on their child whenever they suspect high blood sugar. Children have mild high blood sugar when their blood sugar levels are between 200 mg/dL and 240 mg/dL. If you don't drink enough liquids to replace the fluids lost from high blood sugar levels, you can become dehydrated. Young children can become dehydrated very quickly. Symptoms of dehydration include: If your blood sugar levels are consistently high (usually above 350 mg/dL in adults and above 240 mg/dL in children), you may have moderate to severe symptoms of high blood sugar. These symptoms include: Continue reading >>

What Is Considered A High Blood Sugar Level For A Diabetic?

What Is Considered A High Blood Sugar Level For A Diabetic?

Without diabetes, your blood sugar should stay within the range of 70 to 120 milligrams per deciliter. But if you are diagnosed with diabetes, a more normal range for you may be between 80 and 180 milligrams per deciliter, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Clearly, anything outside of this range is dangerous for a diabetic, and when it gets to a certain level, you may require immediate medical attention. Video of the Day Anytime blood sugar is more than 240 milligrams per deciliter, it’s a cause for concern among diabetics. It is particularly dangerous if your sugar is this high before a meal, since consuming any food would probably cause it to rise even more. When your blood glucose is above 240 milligrams per deciliter, it means your system isn’t getting the energy it needs from glucose and could start breaking down fats. Your body starts producing ketones, which stem from fat deconstruction, possibly putting you into ketoacidosis that could lead to a diabetic coma. If your blood sugar surges to over 300 milligrams per deciliter, contact your physician immediately, since it could be life-threatening. Continue reading >>

When Blood Sugar Is Too High

When Blood Sugar Is Too High

Glucose , or sugar, is the body's main fuel source. That means your body including your brain needs glucose to work properly. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia(say: hi-per-gly-SEE-me-uh) is the medical word for high blood sugar levels. The hormone insulin is supposed to control the level of glucose in the blood. But someone with diabetes doesn't make enough insulin or the insulin doesn't work properly so too much sugar can get into the blood and make the person sick. If you have high blood sugar levels, you may need treatment to lower your blood sugar. Your parents and your diabetes health care team will tell you what your blood sugar levels should be and what to do if they get too high. Managing diabetes is like a three-way balancing act because you have to watch: the medicines you take (insulin or pills) All three need to be balanced. If any one of these is off, blood sugar levels can be, too. Your parents and doctor can help you with this balancing act. In general, higher than normal blood glucose levels can be caused by: not taking your diabetes medicine when you're supposed to or not taking the right amounts eating more food than your meal plan allows (without adjusting your insulin or diabetes pills) taking other kinds of medicines that affect how your diabetes medicines work Keeping blood sugar levels close to normal can be hard sometimes, and nobody's perfect. Grown-ups can help you stay in balance if you have diabetes. Sometimes blood sugar levels can be high because you're growing and your doctor needs to make some changes in your diabetes treatment plan. pee a lot. When blood sugar levels get too high, the kidneys flush out the extra glucose into your urine (pee), which is why people who Continue reading >>

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to blood sugar levels, the numbers always seem to confuse people. So we're here today to cover a whole range of reader questions that have come in. If you have questions of your own, join the discussion – please feel free to leave your comments at the bottom. Healthy blood sugar goal ranges Healthy blood sugar control values will depend on several factors, the most important being when you check it. Blood glucose levels will rise after eating meals regardless of whether a person has diabetes–however, someone with good control will be able to bring it down to a stable level after 2 hours. The diagnostic values below are for non pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Ranges are different for children, those with type I diabetes and pregnant women. FASTING AFTER MEALS 2 HOURS HbA1c Normal 70-99 mg/dL (4-6 mmol/L)* <140 mg/dL (<7.8 mmol/L)** <5.7% Pre-Diabetes 100-125 mg/dL (6.1-6.9 mmol/L) 140-179 mg/dL 5.7-6.4% Diabetes >126 mg/dL (>7 mmol/L) >180 mg/dL 6.5% and higher *Note that different agencies establish different standards. Some range 70-100 mg/dL, some 70-110 mg/dL, some 70-130 mg/dL **Some agencies recommend <180 mg/dL post-meal especially in the elderly and those who have had diabetes for a very long time What should your goals be? That is between you and your healthcare team because it does depend on various factors. But overall your goal is to gain good control of your diabetes, which means maintaining normal levels or getting as close to normal levels as possible (refer to the normal numbers above). We’ve answered some specific questions regarding blood sugar over here, so be sure to check those out as well. Some specific comments and questions we’ve received regarding blood sugar levels include: 1. My post meal is hovering around 140-160, Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Q:I have been told that I have diabetes, or "pre-diabetes", or that I am in the "honeymoon period" . My readings are all over the place: sometimes in the 120's, others in the 90's, sometimes, but rarely in the 150-170's. My doctor does not want to put me on medication yet. I exercise regularly and am not overweight though my diet is variable. I certainly like sweets, pizza, and pasta. What is the long term effect of these continued high blood sugar levels? A:Firstly, kudos for your physician for giving diet/lifestyle changes a chance to work. Reduction of body fat often is the first best start. This may or may not be true in your case but certainly sweets, pizza, etc. are affecting your numbers. If you can discipline yourself at this time to eat unrefined foods and be more active, your beta cells that produce insulin may get the rest they need to become efficient again. Our diabetes management booklet has many referenced foods/supplements that may help to stabilize your glucose levels. In time, your favorite foods may be reintroduced in moderate amounts. You appear to be more in the pre-diabetes range at this time. Complications are a long process. If your daytime levels stay under 120-140, that is good. Fasting levels are higher due to hormonal activity nighttime; these levels are a much slower road towards any complications. Continue working on lifestyle/diet, as both can always be a bit better, and in time, you may start seeing continued improvement. Q:Why do I still have high blood sugar readings even after a super low carb dinner? Im currently on 500mg metformin twice daily. I have already lost 30 pounds and now weigh 300 lbs. A:A set dose of medication doesn't guarantee good control, even with diet improvement. You have started a good path with losing body fat, b Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

My Family History of Diabetes Diabetes has been in my family for generations. My grandmother was a diabetic, my father is diabetic, and during my pregnancy I almost developed prenatal diabetes. Given my family history and my own personal experience, I've learned a lot about this condition over the years. It turns out that there are many things we can do to control our blood sugar though the foods we eat. Normal Blood Glucose Levels What are normal blood glucose levels? Before meals: 80-90 mg/dL After meals: Up to 120 mg/dL Keep in mind that the blood glucose level before a meal for a non-diabetic and a prediabetic person may be very similar. As you can see in the graph below, how your blood sugar fluctuates after eating a meal can be more telling than your pre-meal glucose levels. However, if your pre-meal glucose level is over 100 mg/dL, you should see a doctor. A fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL is considered diabetic. In this article, you will learn about the progression of Type 2 diabetes and how you can reverse it. Understanding the Diagnosis If you are reading this, you probably have been told by your doctor that you have, or someone you care about has, diabetes or prediabetes. You may be surprised, shocked, or even scared. You wonder how and why this is happening. Basically, diabetes means that the level of glucose in your blood (or blood sugar) is too high. Everyone has glucose in his or her blood. We need it to provide energy for all the cells in our body. Having diabetes means you have more than you need, way above normal blood sugar levels. The diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat arbitrary and keeps changing over time. Some time ago, your fasting glucose levels had to be 140 mg/dL or higher to be considered diabetic. Today the official number is 126 mg/dL, an Continue reading >>

12 Healthy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

12 Healthy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Make these simple lifestyle tweaks to feel great all day. Whether you have diabetes or prediabetes—or just generally suffer ill effects from crazy blood sugar swings—you want to know what really works to control your sugar levels. It can make all the difference in living well and staying off the blood sugar roller coaster that can drag down your mood and energy and skew your hunger levels. Here are a dozen tips that will help your blood sugar and your overall health. (If you have diabetes, remember you should always work with your health care team first.) Being naturally thin is not license to stay on your butt. Even for adults at a healthy weight, those who classify as couch potatoes have higher blood sugar than those who are more active, according to a 2017 study from the University of Florida. That can put you at risk for prediabetes, even if you have a normal BMI. Take the stairs, head to the grocery store on foot (if possible), keep that promise to your dog to take him on a walk, and go for that weekend bike ride. Aim for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. In your effort to eat more quinoa, you might have forgotten about an oldie-but-goodie carb: barley. This whole grain is packed with fiber that tamps down your appetite and can help decrease blood sugar, according to a Swedish study published in the journal Cell Metabolism. Why? Your gut bacteria interacts with barley, which may in turn help your body metabolize glucose (sugar). Besides, 1 cup contains 6 grams of fiber, which helps to mute blood sugar spikes. Don't be afraid to toss it in soups, on a roasted veggie salad, or have it as a side to fish or chicken. Exercise is a great way to boost your body's ability to manage blood sugar, but making sure it's a heart-pumping workout will help e Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

Blood sugar control is a main goal for people living with type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar levels can lead to a variety of complications over time, including nerve damage, heart disease, and vision problems. Blood sugar levels that are too low can cause more immediate problems, such as dizziness, confusion, and potentially a loss of consciousness. Keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible is key to preventing these complications and living well with type 2 diabetes. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Glucose, or blood sugar, comes from two places — the food you eat and your liver. “Blood sugar is basically used to supply energy to the body,” explains Deborah Jane Wexler, MD, an endocrinologist in practice at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. For instance, one of your most valued organs — your brain — runs entirely on glucose, she notes. Insulin is used to move glucose into cells to be used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, leading to high blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar can occur when you take too much diabetes medication, skip a meal, or increase your physical activity. Monitoring your blood sugar — by making sure it doesn’t spike too high or dip too low — is an important part of managing your type 2 diabetes. And you can start by learning the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and steps to take to bring those levels back to normal: Hypoglycemia: If blood sugar is too low — usually below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — you may have symptoms such as confusion, sweating, nervousness, nausea, and dizziness. You could even pass out Continue reading >>

Expected Blood Glucose After A High-carb Meal

Expected Blood Glucose After A High-carb Meal

Expected Blood Glucose After a High-Carb Meal Written by Sharon Perkins ; Updated June 22, 2017 Checking your blood glucose after meals helps determine how well you're controlling your blood sugar. 4 Should You Skip a Meal if Your Blood Glucose Is High? Blood glucose levels normally rise after a high-carbohydrate meal and drop back to normal levels within a few hours. But if your glucose levels rise higher than normal and recover more slowly, you might have diabetes. Your doctor can administer tests that measure your blood glucose levels immediately before you consume a high-carbohydrate meal and for several hours afterward. If you already have diabetes, your doctor might want you to check your blood glucose levels after meals, to make sure you're keeping your glucose within the expected range. Healthy, non-diabetic people normally have blood glucose levels of less than 120 milligrams per deciliter two hours after a normal meal, rarely exceeding 140 mg/dL, according to the American Diabetes Association. Levels return to normal within two to three hours. When you undergo a glucose tolerance test, you consume a high-carbohydrate drink or snack containing 75 grams of carbohydrate. At one hour, your test falls into the normal, non-diabetic range if your blood glucose remains below 200 mg/dL. Two hours after your meal, blood glucose should remain below 140 mg/dL. A level of over 200 mg/dL at two hours post-prandial -- which means after a meal -- indicates diabetes. Levels between 140 and 200 mg/dL indicate pre-diabetes, a condition with a strong risk of developing diabetes in the future. Diabetics experience larger spikes in blood glucose that take longer to return to baseline. For diabetics, blood glucose an hour after eating should remain below 180 mg/dL or no more than 8 Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Diabetes: When And Why Your Blood Sugar Levels Matter Most

Pregnancy And Diabetes: When And Why Your Blood Sugar Levels Matter Most

The following is an excerpt from the book Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes by Ginger Vieira and Jennifer Smith, CDE & RD There are two things you can definitely expect will be said to you by total strangers, friends, and several family members because you have diabetes: “Doesn’t that mean your baby will be huge?” “So, is your baby probably going to get diabetes, too?” Both questions are rather rude–sure–but both implications are also very far from accurate. Yes: persistent high blood sugars during pregnancy can lead to a larger baby…but people without diabetes have very large babies, too. And people with diabetes have good ol’ fashioned regularly sized babies, too. There is no way to assure the size of a baby at birth. Skinny women can have huge babies just like an overweight woman can give birth to a very small baby. Women who eat a lot during pregnancy can have small babies! Very little of this is in our control. In the end, you can manage your diabetes extremely tightly and still have a larger than average baby because blood sugar control is not the only thing that impacts the size of your baby at birth, and more importantly, a larger baby is not the only or even most important complication a baby can experience due to mom’s elevated blood sugar levels. No: just because you have diabetes definitely does not mean your baby will have diabetes! And guess what, there’s nothing you can do during pregnancy to prevent or reduce your baby’s risk of developing diabetes…at least not that science and research is aware of at this time. So take a very deep breath, mama, because that is not something you can control, and your baby’s risk of developing type 1 diabetes is actually only about 2 percent higher than the risk of a non-diabetic woman’s baby de Continue reading >>

Strike The Spike Ii

Strike The Spike Ii

Dealing With High Blood Sugar After Meals Eleven years ago, I wrote an article for Diabetes Self-Management about the management of high blood sugar after meals. It was called “Strike the Spike” and no article I’ve ever written has led to greater reader response. To this day, I still receive calls, letters, and e-mails thanking me for offering practical answers to this perplexing challenge. I’ve even been asked to speak on the topic at some major conferences. So when presented with the opportunity to readdress the issue, I jumped at the chance. A lot has changed in the past eleven years: we know more than ever about the harmful effects of after-meal blood sugar spikes, but we also have a number of potent new tools and techniques for preventing them. Now that I know how important this topic is to so many people, I’ll do my absolute best to bring you up to date. What’s a spike? After-meal, or “postprandial,” spikes are temporary high blood glucose levels that occur soon after eating. It is normal for the level of glucose in the blood to rise a small amount after eating, even in people who do not have diabetes. However, if the rise is too high, it can affect your quality of life today and contribute to serious health problems down the road. The reason blood glucose tends to spike after eating in many people with diabetes is a simple matter of timing. In a person who doesn’t have diabetes, eating foods containing carbohydrate causes two important reactions in the pancreas: the immediate release of insulin into the bloodstream, and the release of a hormone called amylin. The insulin starts working almost immediately (to move glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells) and finishes its job in a matter of minutes. The amylin keeps food from reaching the sm Continue reading >>

Is My Blood Sugar Normal?

Is My Blood Sugar Normal?

Normal Blood Sugar in Diabetic vs. Non-Diabetic First, a quick note on how we measure blood sugar.In the USA, blood sugars are measured by weight in milligrams per deciliter, abbreviated as mg/dL. Most everyone else uses millimole per liter, abbreviated mmol. If you are in the USA, look at the big numbers, most everyone else look at the small numbers. In a person without diabetes, blood sugars tend to stay between 70 and 100 mg/dL (3.8 and 5.5 mmol). After a meal, blood sugars can rise up to 120 mg/dL or 6.7mmol. It will typically fall back into the normal range within two hours. These are normal blood sugars in someone without diabetes. Source: Thriving with Diabetes In a personwith diabetes, the story is much more complex: Low Blood Sugars (Hypoglycemia). When blood sugars drop below this level, you may start feeling hunger, shakiness, or racing of the heart. Your body is starved for sugar (glucose). Read how to detect and treat low blood sugars . Normal Blood Sugar. In this range, the body is functioning normally. In someone without diabetes, the vast majority of the time is spent in the lower half of this range. Elevated Blood Sugars. In this range, the body can function relatively normally. However, extended periods of time in this zone put you at risk for long-term complications. High Blood Sugars.At this range, the kidney is unable to reabsorb all of the glucose in your blood and you begin to spill glucose in your urine. Your body may begin to turn to fat for energy and release ketones in your urine. (You can purchase strips to test your urine for ketones. Contact your doctor immediately if you have ketones in your urine.) Normal Waking Blood Sugar (or Fasting Blood Sugar) Ideally, everyone with diabetes will wake up with blood sugars in the normal range. Howeve Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like? Signs & Symptoms Of Hyperglycemia

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like? Signs & Symptoms Of Hyperglycemia

I get my first cup of coffee and sit on the sun deck with the birds singing. I feel as if I have not slept a wink, and my head aches. I could go back to bed and sleep all day, but work awaits. It’s a beautiful, sunny day, but my body feels heavy, and stuck to the chair. It hurts to lift my arms. My blood sugar was 381 this morning. Again. I think about having to face the day at the office. Driving down the interstate, the lines are blurry. I know that if the DMV got wind of it, I might not be driving as high as my A1C had been. When I get to the office, I walk in with a dark fog feeling surrounding me, and take some deep breaths at my desk. As I begin to review the end of the month reports, the numbers get fuzzy, and I can’t concentrate on them. My 36 ounce water bottle with only a few sips left beads sweat on the desk, and it’s across the building to get to the bathroom. Sometimes it’s a race to get there in time. My body is taught and swollen, like the Blueberry Girl from Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. My blood sugar is a blue river of sticky blueberry filling as I roll down the hall toward the bathroom. I feel that if I had a needle, I could pop myself. That would surely be a mess. My skin is so dry and flaky that no amount of lotion will hydrate it. No amount of water can quench my thirst, and my mouth feels like the Sahara Desert. With one hand on the water cooler, and the other hand on the bathroom door, I guzzled down what I could until the feeling hit that I wasn’t going to be able to wait any longer. I was out of regular insulin, and I had taken my long acting insulin. I was not so patiently waiting for it to kick in. This morning was not starting out so well. I’d have to tackle the reports in my current brain fog. I did have a doctor’s appoin Continue reading >>

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