diabetestalk.net

Is 2000mg Of Metformin Too Much

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Fatal Metformin Overdose Presenting With Progressive Hyperglycemia

Fatal Metformin Overdose Presenting With Progressive Hyperglycemia

Go to: CASE REPORT A 29-year-old man ingested metformin in a suicide attempt. The patient consumed the entire remaining contents of his father’s prescription metformin bottle that originally contained 100 tablets of 850 mg each. The father stated that the bottle had contained at least three-quarters of its original contents, putting the ingested dose between 64 and 85 grams. The patient also consumed ethanol, but denied any other co-ingestants. The parents discovered the overdose around 6:30 a.m., about 5 ½ hours post-ingestion, when the patient began complaining of vomiting, diarrhea, thirst, abdominal pain and bilateral leg pain. Paramedics were called, who found the patient to be agitated with a fingerstick glucose level of 180 mg/dL. The patient had a history of psychosis and depression, including prior suicide attempts by drug ingestion. He was not taking any prescribed medications, having discontinued olanzapine and sertraline several months earlier. The patient had no personal history of diabetes, despite the family history of type II diabetes in his father, who was taking no other anti-diabetic medications than metformin. The patient admitted to daily ethanol and tobacco use, but denied any current or past use of illicit drugs. He had no surgical history or known allergies. Vital signs on arrival to the Emergency Department (ED) were temperature of 35.2°C (rectal), pulse of 113 beats/min, blood pressure of 129/59 mmHg, respirations at 28 breaths/min with 100% saturation via pulse oximetry on room air. The patient was awake and oriented x4, but agitated and slightly confused (GCS=14). Pupils were equal and reactive at 4mm and the oral mucous membranes were dry. Other than tachycardia, the heart and lung exams were unremarkable. The abdomen was mildly tender t Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

Started Taking Metformin (glucophage)...is This Too Much?

Started Taking Metformin (glucophage)...is This Too Much?

Started taking Metformin (Glucophage)...is this too much? Started taking Metformin (Glucophage)...is this too much? Hello all - in another post, I mentioned that I have just been diagnosed as having PCOS. My Ob Gyn prescribed me Meformin (Glucophage) to take daily. On the instruction sheet she gave me, it said that I would start by taking 1 pill every day for three days. Then one in the a.m. and one in the p.m. for four days. Then I would take one in the a.m. and two in the p.m. for seven days. Then I would start taking 2 in the a.m. and 2 in the p.m. continuously. I do understand that they have to work up your dosage - but to me...this seems awfully high. Each tab is 500 mg. which means that if I'm eventually taking 4 pills a day, that's 2,000 mg per day! Is that too much? I am 23 years old, very overweight with abnormal periods. On my blood work, it said that my 'fasting blood sugar' was 22 Mg and it should have been 14 Mg and under. I've started the Metformin today, but I still can't help but wonder if this is too much. Any advice out there for those who are taking this type of med? Re: Started taking Metformin (Glucophage)...is this too much? I have just been prescribed 2,000mg a day as well. At first I did not even fill my precription because I thought the dose was too high. I sceduled another apt. with my dr. for him to explain the dose to me!! Met needs to be at higher doses to cancel out the PCOS effects. I would assume that your dr. must have taken this and your blood work results into thought when prescribing your dose. Most women are on 1,500 - 2,000mg a day. I wouldn't worry...and I think it is a great idea that you are uping the meds slowly. Good luck. Re: Started taking Metformin (Glucophage)...is this too much? I have just started Metformin (1000mg per d Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

2000mg Of Metformin???

2000mg Of Metformin???

Well I went to see the new endocrinologist today. This is what he had to say. He upped my dosage from 500mg to 2000mg a day! I will start the increase of 1000 this week, 1500 next week and 2000 the third week. He said I will have GI issues, but after a month my body should get used to it? He also told me its great that I walk 2 mi a day on treadmill, but that will not help me lose weight. He said calorie intake is the only way to lose weight. He said to stay at my current weight, I need 1800 calories a day, if I cut that to 1000-1200 a day, I WILL lose weight. He suggested I do a low gi diet (which I just started) and he suggests to all PCOS patients to either buy shakes for those meals, and then a low gi dinner. He said when you control your calorie intake, you see major difference! So I left there somewhat upset about the 2000 mg of metformin. I have a weak GI to begin with, I dont like using any restroom but my own when I have GI Issues, so it looks like I will be HOUSEBOUND for the next month and half until my body adjusts....lets hope it adjusts sooner rather than later. Anyone else on 2000mg of metformin? Have you lost weight? I am just so discouraged, I feel this PCOS has taken over my life. 10 more lbs and I will weigh as much as I did when I delivered my TWINS!!! Thats nuts. Since my check up at my 6 week appt after giving birth in 2004, I have gained 35 lbs! It is so depressing! I took 2000 mg of Metformin.... I love Metformin!!!! I was on 1000 mg and nothing was happening. My RE switched me to 2000 mg and in two months my cycle started and came both months on the same date and that hasn't happened in over 10 years. I lost 23 lbs in those two months and I wasn't even trying to loose weight and I also FINALLY ovulated and got pregnant with my daughter. While I Continue reading >>

Metformin And Too Much Weight Loss

Metformin And Too Much Weight Loss

The only time I lost way too much weight was the 2 years I was on statins. The statins attacked my muscle tissue and over a 6 month period I lost 15 pounds even though I was eating 2000 + calories a day. I went from being a fairly muscular person to looking like a skeleton. I also had tons of joint and muscle pain as well as memory loss. Once I took myself off the statins, I was able to regain weight and some of the muscle back. My bet would be that she is on some type of statins and she should tell her doctor. Also taking CoQ10 is very important when you are on statins. In my experience, met didn't agree with me. While on Met, I was eating low carb and high fat and between 3K and 5K calories and still couldn't gain any weight. I actually kept losing. It wasn't until I made the decision to go med free that I finally started to gain again. I can now gain weight with ease. Much easier than ever before and it is all lean muscle as my average body fat has not changed. I know that everyone's experience is different but I will not do any form of D medication again unless it is insulin and absolutely necessary. My weight's been pretty stable for the past year or so on 2000 mg/day of metformin. I think I'm down maybe 5 pounds since my initial diagnosis. I'd say without knowing more about the lady's history and lifestyle, it makes no sense to try to blame metformin on her weight and appearance I apologize if it seemed that I was making a diagnosis. I am not a doctor and would not want anyone to see my post as such. I simply wanted to share my experience as I do believe Met played a large part in my weight loss which is what the OP was inquiring about. I honestly believe that under some doctors care, diabetics are given the standard round of drugs without much regard for the pat Continue reading >>

Too Much Metformin!?

Too Much Metformin!?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I had been at a party all day (where they only served cake and cookies, which I didn't touch). I started to get light headed in the later part of the day. I thought I had had one too many coffees (I had 2 small cups with cream and sugar substitute). Anyhow, when I got home, I checked my blood sugar.... And they say non-insulin dependent T2s don't get hypos!! Anyhow, I ate a couple nuts and then had a sensible dinner. My suspicion is that my Metformin dose (3 tablets at 500 G daily) is too high. I have lost 52 pounds since I got my diagnosis, and my blood sugars are really normalized (A1c 5%). Could it be that my greatly reduced body size makes me need less metformin? I've been taking metformin for 4 years, with the last year taking 2550 mg, in 3 (850) doses. I am down to 113 pounds and rarely have lows. Usually when my bg goes into the 70's I will get a liver dump which brings me back up to 90. The only time I may go low is if I am drinking wine, so I need to be careful. That being said I do try to make sure I eat every 5 hours or so, just to play it safe. Hmmm....maybe I didn't eat enough. I am regularly in the 70s though. Even 2 hr PP. On my last endo visit she was looking at my numbers and circled two in the 70ish range and said: well if you keep getting more 75 and below reading reduce your Met by a pill or 1/2 a pill and if after that your still going into that range cut it back by another 1/2. So I have ...from 500 2 x d I now take 1/2 pill in the am and 1/2 in the pm. I guess it's possible, but I don't think too much metformin would cause a hypoglycemic episode, at least not like insul Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I'm seeing quite a few posts on BBSes from people who are having problems with metformin because of side effects that could be eliminated if they were taking the extended release form of this drug. For some reason, many family doctors don't seem to be aware that there is a ER version of this drug that has such benefits. This is probably because metformin is a cheap generic and isn't promoted by herds of beautiful ex-cheerleaders turned drug company salespushers who "educate" doctors about far more expensive--and less effective--newer drugs. Here are the facts: Metformin (also sold under the brand name Glucophage) comes in a regular version which is taken at meal time, three times a day, and an extended release form (marketed as ER or XR) which is taken once a day. Almost always, when people report diarrhea or intense heartburn with metformin, they are taking regular version. I experienced the heartburn on the regular drug. It was very disturbing because the pain was localized over my heart and felt just like the description of a heart attack you read in articles. My doctor assured me it was coming from the metformin, but that didn't make it any easier to live with because I kept wondering how, if I were having a real heart attack, I'd know it wasn't a pain from the drug? The ER version releases the drug more slowly and this usually eliminates the gastrointestinal problems. The trade off with taking the ER form is that the amount of blood sugar lowering you see might be a bit less than with the regular form as the drug acts in a slower smoother fashion rather than hitting all at once. But if you can't take the regular at all drug because of the side effects, the slight weakening in effect is a reasonable trade off. Plus, you only have to remember to take one dose rather Continue reading >>

Is 4000 Mg Of Metformin Too Much 502362

Is 4000 Mg Of Metformin Too Much 502362

Is 4000 Mg Of Metformin Too Much 502362 Este tpico contm resposta, possui 1 voz e foi atualizado pela ltima vez por This amazing site, which includes experienced business for 9 years, is one of the leading pharmacies on the Internet. They are available 24 hours each day, 7 days per week, through email, online chat or by mobile. Everything we do at this amazing site is 100% legal. 24/7 Customer Support. Free Consultation! Is 1500Mg Of Metformin Too Much 659262 Metformin 1500 mg weight loss. Is 1000 mg of metformin too much.Do make you sleepy does cure insulin resistance biguanidas metformina mecanismo de accion 1500 mg metformin pcos heavier period on.4000 mg Metformin per day allnursesMy husband was going to bed and mentioned that he was running out of his metformin.So since January 17th he has been taking 4000mg per day.He is 55 and overweight. I don t know what his baseline creatinine was, but I feel so much better now.Is 4000 mg of amoxicilon too much WikiAnswers Categories Health Medication and Drugs Antibiotics Amoxicillin Is 4000 mg of amoxicilon too much?The recommended daily allowance for sodium is 2400 milligrams. One item of food with 1310 milligrams is a lot.Metformin what is the max. mg use for a day?The recommended starting metformin dose is 500 mg twice daily. The maximum metformin dosing for children age 10 to 16 is 2000 mg, and for adults age 17 and older is 2550 mg.I m taking 4000 mg per day. is this too much? bill.Did 4000mg Metformin cause Kidney failure? : Dr.Bernstein Location: Iowa City, Iowa. 4000 mg of Metformin indeed sound like a lot. As Samantha mentioned, the usual max dosage is 2550 mg/day.However, with a lower carb diet you wouldn t need so many meds. Why start insulin when your body already produces too much?4000 Mg Metformin 2016 Best Ch Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

More in diabetes