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Invokana And Type 1 Diabetes

Invokana Ketoacidosis Lawsuit

Invokana Ketoacidosis Lawsuit

Our lawyers are investigating Invokana Ketoacidosis Lawsuits on behalf of individuals who took Invokana and suffered from ketoacidosis or any of the following injuries: Heart Attack Stroke Kidney Failure Amputation If you or a loved one took Invokana and suffered a serious side effect you may be eligible for financial compensation through an Invokana Lawsuit. Our lawyers are offering free, no obligation lawsuit evaluations – contact us today to discuss a potential Invokana lawsuit. Over $1 billion in settlements and verdicts for our clients If we don’t win or settle your case, you don’t owe anything 95 years of combined experience Call A Lawyer Now – 888-660-6473 Lawsuits are being filed against Janssen Pharmaceuticals and their parent company Johnson & Johnson, the manufacturers of the diabetes drug Invokana, for failing to warn about several serious and potentially deadly side effects, like ketoacidosis. The FDA has issued several recent warnings about side effects of Invokana, and many people are coming forward after developing ketoacidosis and other serious injuries. Johnson & Johnson marketed Invokana as a safe and effective drug, when in fact it was linked to serious complications. Jennifer Anzo from California filed a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson after she suffered diabetic ketoacidosis while taking Invokana. She was hospitalized with severe dehydration, severe abdominal pain, low blood pressure, and tachycardia. Anzo claims she would not have used Invokana if she had known about potential side effects. Invokana lawsuits allege that the manufacturer of Invokana: Did not provide enough warnings about the serious side effects Manufactured and marketed Invokana without performing proper testing Misrepresented Invokana’s safety and efficacy through mar Continue reading >>

Forxiga, Invokana: Health Canada Begins Safety Review Of Diabetes Drugs Known As Sglt2 Inhibitors And Risk Of Ketoacidosis

Forxiga, Invokana: Health Canada Begins Safety Review Of Diabetes Drugs Known As Sglt2 Inhibitors And Risk Of Ketoacidosis

Report a Concern Health Canada initiated a safety review for the prescription diabetes drugs dapagliflozin (Forxiga) and canagliflozin (Invokana) and the risk of ketoacidosis, a serious condition that leads to high levels of blood acids called ketones. Dapagliflozin and canagliflozin are known as SGLT2 (sodium-glucose cotransporter-2) inhibitors and are approved in Canada for use in patients with type 2 diabetes to improve blood sugar levels, along with diet and exercise. Ketoacidosis predominantly develops in people with type 1 diabetes when insulin levels are too low, and is associated with high blood sugar levels. There have been international reports of ketoacidosis with the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with type 2 diabetes who had only slightly increased blood sugar levels. Because ketoacidosis is unexpected and can appear with only slightly increased blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes, it is possible it may not be quickly identified or treated. A preliminary search of Health Canada’s adverse reaction database identified one report of diabetic ketoacidosis involving the hospitalization of a 56-year old male taking an SGLT2 inhibitor. The patient was taking other medications at the time and further assessment will be conducted. Health Canada will review the available information and will determine whether changes are needed in the prescribing information for this class of drugs. Health Canada will communicate the results of its review once it is complete. While the review is progressing, Health Canada is advising Canadians of this potential risk and encouraging them to report adverse reactions to Health Canada. What you should do Symptoms of ketoacidosis include difficulty breathing, feeling very thirsty, vomiting, abdominal pain, nausea, los Continue reading >>

Off-label Use Of Non-insulin Therapies For Type 1 Diabetes During Cold And Flu Season

Off-label Use Of Non-insulin Therapies For Type 1 Diabetes During Cold And Flu Season

Do you know whether you ever been prescribed medication “off-label”? Each prescription drug has a label that describes its FDA-approved uses, which are based on well-designed clinical trials that carefully determined the risks as well as the benefits of the medication. Using a drug “off-label” means that the drug is being used for a condition where studies of its risks and benefits have not yet been carried out. Dr. Anne Peters of the University of Southern California’s Center for Diabetes recently observed that some patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who were taking Invokana™ (canagliflozen tablets) “off-label” have experienced diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) while managing a cold or flu. Invokana is an SGLT2-inhibitor treatment approved by the FDA for treatment in type 2 diabetes (T2D). It works to keep blood glucose levels from going too high by increasing the excretion of glucose in the urine. That’s okay if you have T2D because patients with T2D rarely develop DKA; it’s potentially an issue if you have T1D. People with T1D can develop DKA because they are not getting any insulin (for example, an infusion site problem in patients who use a pump) or aren’t getting enough insulin due to the stress of an illness like the flu. In these cases, they are alerted that DKA may be developing by unexpected and/or persistent increases in blood glucose levels. Such high blood glucose levels should prompt you to test for ketones in the urine or blood. What is different for people with T1D who are taking Invokana is that the warning sign of high blood glucose levels can be lost and DKA can develop with normal blood sugar levels. In fact, instead of taking extra insulin (which is often needed to prevent DKA when you have the cold or flu), Dr. Peters’ patients l Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

INVOKANA® can cause important side effects, including: Amputations. INVOKANA® may increase your risk of lower-limb amputations. Amputations mainly involve removal of the toe or part of the foot; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, have also occurred. Some people had more than one amputation, some on both sides of the body. You may be at a higher risk of lower-limb amputation if you: have a history of amputation, have heart disease or are at risk for heart disease, have had blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg), have damage to the nerves (neuropathy) in the leg, or have had diabetic foot ulcers or sores. Call your doctor right away if you have new pain or tenderness, any sores, ulcers, or infections in your leg or foot. Your doctor may decide to stop your INVOKANA® for a while if you have any of these signs or symptoms. Talk to your doctor about proper foot care Dehydration. INVOKANA® can cause some people to become dehydrated (the loss of too much body water), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure (including diuretics [water pills]), are on a low sodium (salt) diet, have kidney problems, or are 65 years of age or older Vaginal yeast infection. Women who take INVOKANA® may get vaginal yeast infections. Symptoms include: vaginal odor, white or yellowish vaginal discharge (discharge may be lumpy or look like cottage cheese), or vaginal itching Yeast infection of the penis (balanitis or balanoposthitis). Men who take INVOKANA® may get a yeast infection of the skin around the penis. Symptoms include: redness, itching, or swelling o Continue reading >>

Invokana User Reviews For Diabetes, Type 2 (page 3) At Drugs.com

Invokana User Reviews For Diabetes, Type 2 (page 3) At Drugs.com

C. Johnson (taken for less than 1 month) January 21, 2017 Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate "Invokana works best when you drink plenty of water to flush your system. It blocks extra sugar from being absorbed by your body and transfers it to your urine, So, you basically urinate out the extra sugars in your blood. It's also a smart drug, so it will stop being as effective when you are close to normal levels. So you won't drop too low. If you are having a problem with yeast infections, you have to stop eating sugars and carbs. I also highly recommend using virgin coconut oil to treat the yeast infections. Please try this drug, it really works!" Shadowlady68 (taken for less than 1 month) January 17, 2017 Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate "My internist has been trying me on various diabetes medications, alone and in combination, over the past 12 plus years to lower my blood sugar levels. For a long time the situation was ultimately with a combination of Januvia 100mg, Glimipiride twice per day, and Metformin 2 500mg tablets twice per day. Initially the combination gave me diarrhea but I also discovered I was lactose intolerant and eventually the problem went away. But gradually within the past few years my 1AC levels slowly started climbing, at one point to 7.8. About 6 months ago he added Trulicity.5 mg ramped up to 1.5mg. Did not improve blood sugar. Did lower weight.Stopped Trulicity. Just started Invokana. Scared of the risks. Am dehydrated and have yeast infection." "I've only been known diabetic type 2 for 6 months now. I take Janumet, invokana. The only side effect I have is frequent urination and lots of gas and really lot sounds of digestion. Anyone else?" GasAlot (taken for 1 to 6 months) January 5, 2017 Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate "Started w Continue reading >>

Understanding Sglt2 Inhibitors' Diabetic Ketoacidosis Risk

Understanding Sglt2 Inhibitors' Diabetic Ketoacidosis Risk

Deepali Dixit, PharmD, BCPS, is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy and a Clinical Critical Care Pharmacist in the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital. Dr. Dixit has been involved in multiple committees and in leadership positions in regional and national pharmacy and organizations. Dr. Dixit's research interests include sedation and delirium in the critically ill, infectious disease, alcohol withdrawal syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and patient safety. This article was collaboratively written with Shannon Anthony, PharmD Candidate. In May 2015, the FDA issued a warning about the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis while using SGLT2 inhibitors. That December, the FDA updated the drugs’ labels to include warnings about developing ketoacidosis even with near-normal blood glucose levels.1 SGLT2 inhibitors lower blood glucose levels by decreasing renal glucose reabsorption, which increases urinary glucose excretion.2 Three drugs in this class are currently available in the United States: canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance).1 These medications are approved for managing type 2 diabetes, although they’re increasingly used off-label to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D), and trials are currently being conducted to evaluate their efficacy for this potential indication.3 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) develops most frequently in T1D patients secondary to omission or decreased dosage of insulin, acute illness, or a recent surgical procedure.4 The typical clinical presentation includes hyperglycemia (>250mg/dL), anion-gap acidosis, and elevated plasma and urine ketones.3 Early diagnosis and management of ketoacidosis is vital. The cornerstone DKA treatment Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Invokana Problems And Side Effects

Diabetes Drug Invokana Problems And Side Effects

ATTENTION: HEALTH WARNING This is an important health alert for anyone being treated for Type 2 Diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes and take Invokana, please read this for very important information about serious health risks: Invokana – How It Works The drug Invokana was launched in the spring of 2013, and by early 2015 annual sales were projected to exceed $1.2 billion. designed to work with the patient’s kidneys to help remove sugar from the body through the process of urination. By design it allows high levels of glucose to enter the kidneys. It triggers the body’s emergency process to jettison the excess sugar via urinary excretion. Invokana – What Happens To Your Body Normal bodies produce insulin which metabolizes sugar so it can be used as an energy for the body. When there isn’t enough insulin to complete this task, the body cannibalizes fat as an alternative energy source. When that happens, it produces a high level of blood acids called ketones, and this buildup causes a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Type 1 diabetics take insulin to prevent DKA, a condition which has a very high risk of causing a heart attack. Invokana – The Problem By allowing the buildup of sugar in the kidneys without the introduction of additional insulin (either naturally produced by the body or taken as medication), Invokana actually decreases urinary excretion of ketones. DKA is now appearing in Invokana patients with normal or near normal glucose counts. While Invokana is working as predicted in terms of glucose, it is also causing a very dangerous elevation of ketones levels in the blood: DKA, a serious condition which may require either hospitalization or emergency room care. Invokana – The Risk: Heart Attack Studies have shown in the first 30 days of Continue reading >>

Canagliflozin (invokana), A Novel Oral Agent For Type-2 Diabetes

Canagliflozin (invokana), A Novel Oral Agent For Type-2 Diabetes

Go to: SGLT-2 is a high-capacity, low-affinity transporter located in the brush border of the membrane of the early segment of the proximal tubule. Canagliflozin is an SGLT-2 inhibitor that increases glucose excretion in the urine by reducing re-absorption of filtered glucose and lowering the renal glucose threshold. The structural formula of canagliflozin is shown in Figure 1. Go to: Canagliflozin is rapidly absorbed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It has a relative oral bioavailability of 65% and reaches peak concentrations within 1 to 2 hours. It can be taken without regard to food, but it is recommended that it be taken before the first meal of the day to allow for the potential to reduce postprandial plasma glucose excursions resulting from delayed intestinal glucose absorption. Canagliflozin is highly protein-bound, mostly to albumin at 99%. The half-lives of 100 mg and 300 mg are 10.6 hours and 13.1 hours, respectively. The drug is metabolized primarily into two inactive metabolites by uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes: UGT 1A9 and UGT 2B4 via glucuronidation. Approximately 7% of the drug also undergoes oxidation via cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes. Canagliflozin is eliminated largely unchanged in the feces (41.5%) and as metabolites in the urine (30.5%). Removal by dialysis is negligible, and hepatic involvement is minimal. Go to: Several phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of canagliflozin. Three important studies have been published and may aid in determining the role of canagliflozin in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Table 1 summarizes the significant findings of each trial. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study was conducted to compare the efficacy Continue reading >>

Dapagliflozin (forxiga) And Canagliflozin (invokana) Sodiumglucose Co-transporter-2 Inhibitors For Add-on Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Dapagliflozin (forxiga) And Canagliflozin (invokana) Sodiumglucose Co-transporter-2 Inhibitors For Add-on Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) and canagliflozin (Invokana) sodiumglucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors for add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) and canagliflozin (Invokana) sodiumglucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors for add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus A new drug class for lowering blood glucose in type 2 diabetes, as dual combination therapy with metformin or a sulfonylurea A new class of oral treatment for type 2 diabetes Sodiumglucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors block glucose reabsortion in the kidneys, so efficacy is dependent on kidney function. SGLT2 inhibitors are PBS listed for dual combination therapy Use in dual therapy in combination with metformin or a sulfonylurea in patients who are not able to be adequately controlled with metformin and a sulfonylurea. Comparable efficacy and safety, in dual combination with metformin or a sulfonylurea, to that of metformin combined with a sulfonylurea SGLT2 inhibitors provide another add-on option to improve glycaemic control in combination with metformin or a sulfonylurea, with a low risk of hypoglycaemic events except when combined with a sulfonylurea. SGLT2 inhibitors are associated with modest weight loss Caloric loss in urine is associated with modest weight loss and reduced abdominal obesity. Increase in glycosuria leads to a higher risk of urogenital infections Taking SGLT2 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of mild to moderate urogenital tract infections. Effects on diabetes-related complications and mortality are unknown There are no long-term data on the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors on macrovascular disease, diabetes-related complications and mortality. In comparison with other combination therapies, both dapagliflozin and canagliflozin provide similar improve Continue reading >>

Invokana (canagliflozin Tablets): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

Invokana (canagliflozin Tablets): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

An approximately 2-fold increased risk of lower limb amputations associated with INVOKANA use was observed in CANVAS and CANVAS-R, two large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes who had established cardiovascular disease (CVD) or were at risk for CVD. Amputations of the toe and midfoot were most frequent; however, amputations involving the leg were also observed. Some patients had multiple amputations, some involving both limbs. Before initiating, consider factors that may increase the risk of amputation, such as a history of prior amputation, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulcers. Monitor patients receiving INVOKANA for infection, new pain or tenderness, sores or ulcers involving the lower limbs, and discontinue if these complications occur [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. INVOKANA (canagliflozin) contains canagliflozin, aninhibitor of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2), the transporterresponsible for reabsorbing the majority of glucose filtered by the kidney.Canagliflozin, the active ingredient of INVOKANA, is chemically known as (1S)-1,5-anhydro-1-[3-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienyl]methyl]-4-methylphenyl]-D-glucitolhemihydrate and its molecular formula and weight are C24H25FO5SH2O and 453.53, respectively. The structural formula forcanagliflozin is: Canagliflozin is practicallyinsoluble in aqueous media from pH 1.1 to 12.9. INVOKANA is supplied as film-coatedtablets for oral administration, containing 102 and 306 mg of canagliflozin ineach tablet strength, corresponding to 100 mg and 300 mg of canagliflozin(anhydrous), respectively. Inactive ingredients of thecore tablet are croscarmellose sodium, hydroxypropyl cellulose, lactoseanhydrous, magnesium stearate, and microcrystalline cellulose. The magne Continue reading >>

Canagliflozin, Invokana

Canagliflozin, Invokana

Is canagliflozin safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding? What is canagliflozin, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Canagliflozin is an oral drug that reduces blood sugar (glucose) levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. It is a new type of diabetes medication in a class of medications called sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Under normal conditions, glucose is filtered out of the blood and into the kidney tubules as blood passes through the kidneys. The glucose then as absorbed from the tubules back into the blood so that glucose is not lost in the urine. SGLT2 is an enzyme in the kidney tubule that causes glucose to be reabsorbed from urine. Canagliflozin blocks the action of SGLT2. Therefore, canagliflozin reduces the reabsorption of glucose from renal tubules, leading to more excretion of glucose in urine. Canagliflozin was approved by the FDA in March 2013. What are the side effects of canagliflozin? AND PRECAUTIONSThe most common side effects of canagliflozin are: Other side effects of canagliflozin include: Diabetes Diet: Healthy Meal Plans for Diabetes-Friendly Eating What is the dosage for canagliflozin? Canagliflozin should be taken before the first meal of the day. The recommended starting dose is 100 mg once daily and the maximum dose is 300 mg once daily. Renal function should be assessed prior to starting canagliflozin and periodically during treatment, and the dose of canagliflozin should be modified based on renal function. Which drugs or supplements interact with canagliflozin? : Canagliflozin may slightly increase the concentration of digoxin (Lanoxin) in the body when both drugs are being taken. Digoxin concentrations should be monitored appropriately. Rifampin, phenytoin (Dilantin, Dilantin-125, phenobarbital, and ri Continue reading >>

Fda Warns Of Amputation Risk Linked To Newer Diabetes Drug

Fda Warns Of Amputation Risk Linked To Newer Diabetes Drug

agency officials have directed(www.fda.gov) that a new boxed warning be added to the package label of the medication canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet XR) to advise prescribers and patients of a heightened risk for leg and foot amputations associated with the drug. Canagliflozin is a member of the class of medications known as sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Marketed as single-ingredient products or in combination with other diabetes drugs such as metformin, SGLT2 inhibitors are FDA-approved for use in conjunction with diet and exercise to lower blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes -- specifically, by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. The safety and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitors have not been established in patients with type 1 diabetes, and these drugs are not approved for use in these patients. The MedWatch alert, issued on May 16, was based on results of two large clinical trials -- CANVAS (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) and CANVAS-R (A Study of the Effects of Canagliflozin on Renal Endpoints in Adult Participants With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus) -- which showed that leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients treated with the drug as in those who took a placebo. Specifically, according to a related FDA drug safety communication,(www.fda.gov) the CANVAS trial found the risks of amputation over a year's time were equivalent to 5.9 out of every 1,000 patients for canagliflozin compared with 2.8 out of every 1,000 patients for placebo. In the CANVAS-R trial, the comparative risks were equivalent to 7.5 per 1,000 patients for canagliflozin and 4.2 per 1,000 patients for placebo. Although amputations involving the toe or middle of the foot were the most common, amputations of the leg -- both Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Gets Fda Warning Due To Amputation Risk

Diabetes Drug Gets Fda Warning Due To Amputation Risk

HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The type 2 diabetes prescription drug canagliflozin (brand names Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet XR) appears to increase the risk of leg and foot amputations, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. The FDA is requiring the medications to carry new warnings about the risk. The required warnings on the drug's labeling include the most serious and prominent boxed warning. The agency's decision is based on data from two large clinical trials showing that leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients taking canagliflozin as among those taking a placebo. Amputations of the toe and middle of the foot were the most common, but leg amputations below and above the knee also occurred. Some patients had more than one amputation, some had amputations involving both limbs, according to the FDA. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps to usher sugar from foods into the body's cells. When this process doesn't work correctly, blood sugar levels rise. Left untreated, high blood sugar levels can cause a number of possible complications, including heart disease, kidney problems and amputations, according to the American Diabetes Association. Canagliflozin is meant to be used with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of drugs called sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. These drugs lower blood sugar levels by causing the kidneys to remove sugar from the body through the urine. It is available as a single-ingredient product under the brand name Invokana and also in combination with the diabetes medicine metformin under the brand name Invokamet. Patients taking canagliflozin shoul Continue reading >>

The ‘cure’ To Type 2 Diabetes

The ‘cure’ To Type 2 Diabetes

“You have Type 2 diabetes.” In 2012, 1.7 million Americans heard their doctors utter these five words while sitting in a cold, bleak white medical room. By the beginning of 2013, more than 26 million people in the United States were living with diabetes. With another 86 million showing symptoms of prediabetes, the pharmaceutical industry raced to find a way to keep patients together. Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical company was the first to cross the finish line. They were crowned innovators of the year for developing Invokana — the drug of the future, a major medical advancement for Type 2 diabetes. Most of the medical community rang out in support. “It’s not hype to say that this is a new class of drug that could provide patients with a lot of beneficial results,” Dr. Zachary Bloomgarden, clinical professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and nationally renowned diabetes educator, said in an interview with “A Sweet Life.” Invokana works independent of insulin, unlike previous diabetes medications. Belonging to the SGLT2 inhibitor drug family, Invokana allows excess sugar in the body to pass through urine after the kidneys filter it from the blood, rather than the sugar re-entering the bloodstream. “The bottom line with this drug is that it controlled blood sugar levels without causing weight gain and caused almost no hypoglycemia,” Dr. Bloomgarden said. “This drug could be the backbone of new treatments for Type 2 diabetes.” The doctor wasn’t alone in his optimism for Invokana’s future. Wall Street analysts predicted money would be flowing to J&J for years to come. Lawrence Biegelsen, of Wells Fargo, predicted sales would hit $667 million in 2016, according to the New York Times. It’s possible, however, these profitable projections were Continue reading >>

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