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International Diabetes Guidelines

2005: The International Diabetes Federation Focuses On The Diabetic Foot

2005: The International Diabetes Federation Focuses On The Diabetic Foot

, Volume 5, Issue6 , pp 436440 | Cite as 2005: The International Diabetes Federation focuses on the diabetic foot The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has proclaimed 2005 to be the "Year of the Diabetic Foot." Together with the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot, the IDF has launched a year-long campaign to raise awareness of the diabetic foot worldwide. In this article, both organizations are briefly described, an overview of the aims of the global awareness campaign is given, and the activities to promote World Diabetes Day in 2005 are outlined. Attention is also paid to present and future developments to improve the standards of diabetic foot care worldwide. Health Care ProfessionalInternational ConsensusInternational Diabetes FederationPractical GuidelinePress Conference These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Jeffcoate WJ, van Houtum WH: Amputation as a marker of the quality of foot care in diabetes. Diabetologia 2004, 47:20512058. PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar Jeffcoate WJ, Harding KG: Diabetic foot ulcers. Lancet 2003, 361:15451551. Gives a clear systematic overview of the diabetic foot. Impact, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed. PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar Schaper NC, Apelqvist J, Bakker K: The International Consensus and Practical Guidelines on the management and prevention of the Diabetic Foot. Curr Diab Rep 2003, 3:475479. PubMed Google Scholar International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot and Practical Guidelines on the Management and the Prevention of the Diabetic Foot. Amsterdam, the Continue reading >>

Idf Congress 2017: International Diabetes Federation

Idf Congress 2017: International Diabetes Federation

IDF Congress 2017: International Diabetes Federation IDF Dealing With Diabetes in Disaster Zones: Planning Is Vital How to help people living with diabetes caught up in natural or human-caused disasters was a central focus of the IDF Congress this year; there is much work still to be done, attendees heard. Medscape Medical News, December 7, 2017 IDF IDF Publicizes Guidelines for Diabetic Foot for GPs The latest IDF guidance on diabetic foot is available in a simple pocket form for GPs to help them intervene sooner in this complication, in a "window of opportunity" before an ulcer develops. Medscape Medical News, December 6, 2017 IDF Liquid Diet, Gradual Reintroduction of Food, Prompts Diabetes Remission Almost 50% of patients who followed a very low-calorie liquid diet, followed by phased reintroduction of meals, were able to reverse their type 2 diabetes, show 1-year results from the DiRECT trial. Medscape Medical News, December 5, 2017 Medscape Medical News, November 28, 2017 IDF Atlas: About 415 Million Adults Worldwide Have Diabetes Diabetes prevalence continues to climb worldwide, even in poor nations and in the United States, despite a recent drop in incidence. Smaller Insulin Manufacturers Could Improve Access Extensive market research identifies 39 companies that make insulin in addition to the "Big 3," which could potentially offer greater access to the product in low- and middle-income countries. Stand or Walk: Either Way, Breaking Up Sitting is Beneficial A study finds that either standing or walking for 5 minutes every half hour throughout the day improves glycemic parameters among postmenopausal women at risk for diabetes. Continue reading >>

Quality Of Clinical Practice Guidelines For Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Quality Of Clinical Practice Guidelines For Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Quality of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Haley K. Holmer , Lauren A. Ogden , Brittany U. Burda , Susan L. Norris Affiliation: Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States of America Affiliation: Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States of America Affiliation: Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, Oregon, United States of America Affiliation: Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States of America Several studies have reported that clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in a variety of clinical areas are of modest or variable quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of an international cohort of CPGs that provide recommendations on pharmaceutical management of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We searched the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) on February 15th and June 4th, 2012 for CPGs meeting inclusion criteria. Two independent assessors rated the quality of each CPG using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument. Twenty-four guidelines were evaluated, and most had high scores for clarity and presentation. However, scope and purpose, stakeholder involvement, rigor of development, and applicability domains varied considerably. The majority of guidelines scored low on editorial independence, and only seven CPGs were based on an underlying systematic review of the evidence. The overall quality of CPGs for glycemic control in DM2 is moderate, but there is substa Continue reading >>

Psychosocial Guidelines

Psychosocial Guidelines

On this site we have assembled international guidelines on psychosocial care in diabetes treatment. IDF Guidelines IDF – Global Guideline for Type 2 Diabetes There is now extensive evidence on the optimal management of diabetes, offering the opportunity of improving the immediate and long-term quality of life of those with the condition. Unfortunately such optimal management is not reaching many, perhaps the majority, of the people who could benefit. Reasons include the size and complexity of the evidence-base, and the complexity of diabetes care itself. One result is a lack of proven cost-effective resources for diabetes care. Another result is diversity of standards of clinical practice. Guidelines are one part of a process that seeks to address those problems. Many guidelines have appeared internationally, nationally, and more locally in recent years, but most of these have not used the rigorous new guideline methodologies for identification and analysis of the evidence. Accordingly the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has developed a Global Guideline for Type 2 Diabetes (Download PDF) (Brussels: International Diabetes Federation, 2005). IDF Europe Guideline for Type 2 Diabetes This Guideline is available as an HTML version. IDF Europe Guideline for Type 1 Diabetes This Guideline is available as an HTML version. IDF – Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Childhood and Adolescence The ISPAD Consensus Guidelines for the Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescence are aimed at health professionals and were formally launched on October 30, 2000. The Guidelines have been endorsed and adopted by IDF and are available as an HTML version. IDF – WPR Type 2 Diabetes Pratical Targets and Treatments The Asian P Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Federation Guideline For Management Of Postmeal Glucose: A Review Of Recommendations

International Diabetes Federation Guideline For Management Of Postmeal Glucose: A Review Of Recommendations

International Diabetes Federation guideline for management of postmeal glucose: a review of recommendations Clinical Science Research Institute, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, UK *Institute of Obesity, Natrition, and Exercise, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Correspondence to: Professor Antonio Ceriello, Warwick Medical School, Clinical Science Research Institute, Clinical Science Building, University Hospital Walsgrave Campus, Clifford Bridge Road, Coventry CV2 2DX, UK. Tel.: +44 (0) 24 7696 8652. E-mail: [email protected] Copyright Journal compilation 2008 Diabetes UK Re-use of this article is permitted in accordance with the Creative Commons Deed, Attribution 2.5, which does not permit commercial exploitation. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes is a significant and growing concern, with over 246 million people around the world living with the disease and another 308 million with impaired glucose tolerance. Depending on the resources of different nations, intervention has generally focused on optimizing overall glycaemic control as assessed by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) values. Nevertheless, increasing evidence supports the importance of controlling all three members of the glucose triad, namely HbA1c, FPG and postmeal glucose (PMG) in order to improve outcome in diabetes. As part of its global mission to promote diabetes care and prevention and to find a cure, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) recently developed a guideline that reviews evidence to date on PMG and the development of diabetic complications. Based on an extensive database search of the literature, and guided by a Steering and Development Committee including experts from around the world, the IDF Guide Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Federation Guideline For Management Of Postmeal Glucose: Areview Of Recommendations.

International Diabetes Federation Guideline For Management Of Postmeal Glucose: Areview Of Recommendations.

1. Diabet Med. 2008 Oct;25(10):1151-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2008.02565.x. International Diabetes Federation guideline for management of postmeal glucose: areview of recommendations. (1)Clinical Science Research Institute, Warwick Medical School, Coventry, UK. [email protected] Diabetes is a significant and growing concern, with over 246 million peoplearound the world living with the disease and another 308 million with impairedglucose tolerance. Depending on the resources of different nations, intervention has generally focused on optimizing overall glycaemic control as assessed byglycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) values.Nevertheless, increasing evidence supports the importance of controlling allthree members of the glucose triad, namely HbA(1c), FPG and postmeal glucose(PMG) in order to improve outcome in diabetes. As part of its global mission topromote diabetes care and prevention and to find a cure, the InternationalDiabetes Federation (IDF) recently developed a guideline that reviews evidence todate on PMG and the development of diabetic complications. Based on an extensive database search of the literature, and guided by a Steering and DevelopmentCommittee including experts from around the world, the IDF Guideline forManagement of Postmeal Glucose offers recommendations for appropriate clinicalmanagement of PMG. These recommendations are intended to help clinicians andorganizations in developing strategies for effective management of PMG inindividuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The following review highlights the recommendations of the guideline, the supporting evidence provided and the major conclusions drawn. The full guideline is available for download at Continue reading >>

Aap Supports The International Diabetes Federation Guideline On Oral Health For People With Diabetes

Aap Supports The International Diabetes Federation Guideline On Oral Health For People With Diabetes

AAP Supports the International Diabetes Federation Guideline on Oral Health for People with Diabetes CHICAGONovember 3, 2009Clinical guidelines from the International Diabetes emphasize the importance of periodontal health for people with diabetes. Diabetes affects approximately people worldwide, and this number is only expected to increase. The IDF is an organization of The IDF oral health clinical guideline supports what research has already suggested: that management of periodontal affects the gums and other supporting tissues around the help reduce the risk of developing diabetes and can also help people with diabetes control their blood sugar levels. Studies have suggested there is a two-way relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease, and the outlines helpful guidance for health professionals who treat people living with and at risk for diabetes. The IDF guideline contains clinical recommendations on periodontal care, written in collaboration with the World Dental Federation (FDI), that encourage health professionals to conduct annual inquiries for symptoms of periodontal disease such as swollen or red gums, or bleeding during tooth brushing; and to educate their patients with diabetes about the implications of the condition on oral health, and especially periodontal health. Everyone should maintain healthy teeth and gums to avoid periodontal disease, but people with diabetes should pay extra attention, said Samuel Low, DDS, MS, Associate Dean and professor of periodontology at the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and President of the American Academy of Periodontal disease triggers the bodys inflammatory response which can affect insulin sensitivity and ultimately lead to unhealthy blood sugar levels. Establishing routine periodontal care is Continue reading >>

Guidelines

Guidelines

There is now extensive evidence on the optimal management of diabetes, offering the opportunity of improving the immediate and long-term quality of life of those living with the condition. Unfortunately such optimal management is not reaching many, perhaps the majority, of the people who could benefit. Reasons include the size and complexity of the evidence-base, and the complexity of diabetes care itself. One result is a lack of proven cost-effective resources for diabetes care. Another result is diversity of standards of clinical practice. Guidelines are part of the process which seeks to address those problems. IDF has produced a series of guidelines on different aspects of diabetes management, prevention and care. Global Guideline for Type 2 Diabetes In 2005 the first IDF Global Guideline for type 2 diabetes was developed. This presented a unique challenge as we tried to develop a guideline that is sensitive to resource and cost-effectiveness issues. Many national guidelines address one group of people with diabetes in the context of one health-care system, with one level of national and health-care resources. This is not true in the global context where, although every health-care system seems to be short of resources, the funding and expertise available for health-care vary widely between countries and even between localities. This guideline represents an update of the first guideline and extends the evidence base by including new studies and treatments which have emerged since the original guideline was produced in 2005. Download Continue reading >>

Implications Of Postprandial Glucose And Weight Control In People With Type 2 Diabetes

Implications Of Postprandial Glucose And Weight Control In People With Type 2 Diabetes

Implications of Postprandial Glucose and Weight Control in People With Type 2 Diabetes Understanding and implementing the International Diabetes Federation guidelines From the Department of Medicine IV, Eberhard-Karls-University Tbingen, Tbingen, Germany. Corresponding author: Baptist Gallwitz, baptist.gallwitz{at}med.uni-tuebingen.de. Diabetes Care 2009 Nov; 32(suppl 2): S322-S325. Understanding and implementing the International Diabetes Federation guidelines The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) recently published guidelines for the management of postmeal hyperglycemia. These guidelines were established in view of the risk of postmeal hyperglycemia for vascular events. Because of the rising incidence and prevalence of diabetes and its complications, the IDF took action to state useful strategies for the treatment of diabetes, focusing on the detection and therapy of postprandial hyperglycemia. Besides nonpharmacological measures (blood glucose self-control and diet), drugs such as short-acting insulinotropic agents (sulfonylureas and glinides), glucosidase inhibitors, insulin, and incretin-based therapies can specifically be used to act on postmeal glucose elevations. The specific action profiles of these agents are shown and discussed with respect to the IDF guidelines. POSTMEAL HYPERGLYCEMIA AS A RISK FACTOR IN TYPE 2 DIABETES Type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease that affects 250 million people worldwide today, with an increasing incidence in the years to come (1). With this epidemic dimension, type 2 diabetes is of global concern. Poor control of the disease is a leading cause of death in most developed countries and is associated with microvascular complications (renal failure and blindness due to retinopathy) and macrovascular complication Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Federation

International Diabetes Federation

Advancing diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide Since 1950 Associated with the United Nations Department of Public Information In official relations with the World Health Organization and Pan-American Health Organization IDF championed the UN Resolution on Diabetes (UN Resolution 61/225) What is the IDF? NGO with HQ in Brussels 203 national diabetes associations, 162 countries, over 2 million members Voice of diabetes globally (250 million) In official relations with WHO, UN (DPI) IDF championed the UN Resolution on Diabetes (UN Resolution 61/225) A Federation of 203 national diabetes associations, 162 countries, over 2 million members Voice of diabetes globally (250 million) International Diabetes Federation Since 1950 Associated with the United Nations Department of Public Information In official relations with the World Health Organization and Pan-American Health Organization IDF championed the UN Resolution on Diabetes (UN Resolution 61/225) IDF Programs IDF Clinical Guidelines IDF Atlas (single congruent data source) IDF Centres of Diabetes Education IDF Life for a Child IDF World Diabetes Congresses UN World Diabetes Day Empower, Educate, Energise (Understand diabetes and take control) IDF Programs IDF Programs IDF Clinical Guidelines IDF Atlas (single congruent data source) IDF Centres of Diabetes Education IDF Life for a Child IDF World Diabetes Congresses UN World Diabetes Day Empower, Educate, Energise (Understand diabetes and take control) It was obvious how divided the diabetes organizations were and many were head to head competitors. We created the concept of a “diabetes world†working under the banner of a blue circle representing an Unite for diabetes movement. We have used this slide a lot recently to demonstrate the growing recogniti Continue reading >>

Guidelines

Guidelines

There is now extensive evidence on the optimal management of diabetes, offering the opportunity of improving the immediate and long-term quality of life of those living with the condition. Unfortunately such optimal management is not reaching many, perhaps the majority, of the people who could benefit. Reasons include the size and complexity of the evidence-base, and the complexity of diabetes care itself. One result is a lack of proven cost-effective resources for diabetes care. Another result is diversity of standards of clinical practice. Guidelines are part of the process which seeks to address those problems. IDF has produced a series of guidelines on different aspects of diabetes management, prevention and care. The new IDF Clinical Practice Recommendations for managing Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Care seek to summarise current evidence around optimal management of people with type 2 diabetes. It is intended to be a decision support tool for general practitioners, hospital based clinicians and other primary health care clinicians working in diabetes. Pocket chart in the format of a Z-card with information for health professionals to identify, assess and treat diabetic foot patients earlier in the "window of presentation" between when neuropathy is diagnosed and prior to developing an ulcer. The content is derived from the IDF Clinical Practice Recommendations on the Diabetic Foot 2017. Available to download and to order in print format. The IDF Clinical Practice Recommendations on the Diabetic Foot are simplified, easy to digest guidelines to prioritize health care practitioner's early intervention of the diabetic foot with a sense of urgency through education. The main aims of the guidelines are to promote early detection and intervention; provide the criteria for Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Center: Overview

International Diabetes Center: Overview

Executive Director, International Diabetes Center Richard Bergenstal, MD works with patients in research studies related to type 1 and type 2 diabetes and new diabetes technology. He is also involved in training health professionals in the U.S. and internationally and publishing educational materials for patients and professionals. His clinical work focuses on optimizing patient-centered team care and the appropriate use of glucose monitoring and insulin therapy. Executive Director, Care Delivery Partnerships Joan Bissen oversees International Diabetes Center as Executive Director, Care Delivery Partnerships, HealthPartners Institute. Bissen leads innovations in clinical research, patient education and continuing medical education. Prior to this, Bissen directed the Office of Continuing Medical Education. International Diabetes Center is a division of HealthPartners Institute. Janet Davidson directs diabetes education services at Park Nicollet clinic sites, inpatient at Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital, behavioral health, and Melrose Institute Eating Disorders and Diabetes programs. She also serves on the Park Nicollet Inpatient Diabetes Operation Team and is a content expert and author for diabetes education publications. Mary Johnson directs the testing of new diabetes medications, devices, nutrition research and best care practices at International Diabetes Center. She has developed research protocols and has served as project director on numerous research trials. She has also co-authored articles and abstracts in the specialty areas of hypertension, cardiology, nephrology and diabetes. Johnson is a member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) EDIC/DCCT and GRADE study groups and previously served on the ACCORD/ACCORDIAN study. She has had industry experience a Continue reading >>

Quality Of Guidelines On The Management Of Diabetes In Pregnancy: A Systematic Review

Quality Of Guidelines On The Management Of Diabetes In Pregnancy: A Systematic Review

Quality of guidelines on the management of diabetes in pregnancy: a systematic review Greuter et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2012 Diabetes during pregnancy can lead to severe risks for both mother and fetus when it is not managed properly. The use of rigorously developed guidelines with a robust implementation process can have a positive influence on the management of diabetes during pregnancy. This study aims to compare recommendations and assess the quality of clinical guidelines on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pre-existing diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. Guidelines were selected by searching PubMed, the Guideline Clearing House and Google. All guidelines developed since 2000 on diabetes during pregnancy in English or Dutch were considered. Recommendations of the guidelines were compared. Furthermore, the quality was assessed by two authors independently, using the AGREE instrument. Eight guidelines were included. According to the AGREE instrument, the quality of most guidelines was low. The domains editorial independence, stakeholder involvement and rigour of development had the lowest scores. Recommendations were mainly comparable on glycemic control, preconceptional counseling and prenatal care and labour. Differences between recommendations were found for screening on GDM and induction of labour. The quality of most guidelines concerning the management of diabetes during pregnancy needs to be improved. A more systematic approach in the development of these guidelines, more attention for updating procedures and piloting of the guidelines and involvement of target users and patients is recommended. Clinical guidelinesDiabetes mellitusGestational diabetesPregnancy Diabetes during pregnancy can lead to serious risks for both mother and fetus [ 1 ] Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Federation

International Diabetes Federation

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is a worldwide alliance of over 230 national diabetes associations in more than 160 countries, who have come together to enhance the lives of people with diabetes everywhere. The Federation is committed to raising global awareness of diabetes, promoting appropriate diabetes care and prevention, and encouraging activities towards finding a cure for the different types of diabetes. The Federation has been leading the global diabetes community since 1950. It is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. According to the latest IDF figures,[1] there are currently 415 million people living with diabetes and the total is expected to rise to 640 million by 2040. Some 75% of people with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries and almost half of people living with diabetes are undiagnosed. Organization[edit] IDF is divided into seven regions,[2] with the aim of strengthening the work of national diabetes associations and enhancing the collaboration between them. IDF’s national diabetes associations are divided into the following regions: Africa (AFR),Europe (EUR),Middle East and North Africa (MENA), North America and Caribbean (NAC), South and Central America (SACA), South East Asia (SEA) and Western Pacific (WP). IDF’s working bodies bring together the most important stakeholders from the global diabetes community in a collaborative effort to set common goals and co-ordinate activities towards the attainment of these goals. These stakeholders include: people with diabetes and their families; professionals involved in diabetes healthcare and related fields; diabetes representative organizations, and partners from commercial organizations with concerns which align with the mission of the Federation. IDF is associated with the Dep Continue reading >>

Invited Review Diabetes And Ramadan: Practical Guidelines

Invited Review Diabetes And Ramadan: Practical Guidelines

1. Introduction Fasting during Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam and is obligatory for all healthy adult Muslims. Within the Muslim community, there is an intense desire to participate in fasting, even among those who are eligible for exemption. The timing of Ramadan is based on the lunar calendar (355 days per year), which means that the start of Ramadan varies from year to year. In some parts of the world, daylight can last up to 20 h in the peak of summer. Climate conditions also vary according to the date of Ramadan, with people fasting in very dry and hot weather some years. Some regions with a high Muslim population, including the Middle East, Africa and South East Asia, are expected to see the number of patients with diabetes more than double in the next 25 years [1]. The Epidemiology of Diabetes and Ramadan (EPIDIAR) study performed in 2001 found that 42.8% and 78.7% of patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM/T2DM), respectively, fasted for at least 15 days during Ramadan [2]. More recently, the CREED study reported that 94.2% of T2DM patients fasted for at least 15 days and 63.6% fasted every day [3]. For fasting Muslims, the onset of Ramadan heralds a sudden shift in meal times and sleep patterns. This has important implications for physiology, with ensuing changes in the rhythm and magnitude of fluctuations in several homeostatic and endocrine processes. Sleeping patterns are often altered during Ramadan and several circadian rhythm changes have been noted, including changes in body temperature and cortisol levels [4–7]. When fasting, insulin resistance/deficiency can lead to excessive glycogen breakdown and increased gluconeogenesis in patients with diabetes, as well as ketogenesis in patients with T1DM. As a result, the risks faci Continue reading >>

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