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International Diabetes Federation Singapore

10th International Diabetes Federation- Western Pacific Region Congress (10th Idf-wpr Congress 2014)

10th International Diabetes Federation- Western Pacific Region Congress (10th Idf-wpr Congress 2014)

10th International Diabetes Federation- Western Pacific Region Congress (10th IDF-WPR Congress 2014) Suntec Singapore Convention and Exhibition Centre # | Singapore, SINGAPORE Title: 10th International Diabetes Federation- Western Pacific Region Congress (10th IDF-WPR Congress 2014) Specialty: , Endocrinology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Dates: From Nov, 21, 2014 to Nov, 24, 2014 Weather Info (monthly averages) Max Temperature: C / F Min Temperature: C / F The above data in our Weather Info table are temperature predictions for the date of the medical event for Singapore, Singapore. Suntec Singapore Convention and Exhibition Centre # Whether it is a strategic corporate meeting or a light-hearted celebration of corporate success; we haveflexible packages to suit your needs. Our space allows you to be creative with your events. Suntec Singapore is centrally located in the Marina Bay areawith ample parking spaces and easy access to public transportation, restaurants, shopping and entertainment.With a passion to host and serve, our dedicated Experience Managers are at your service to provide a single point of contact.Backed by highly trained and capable Suntec experts, approved partners and alliances, our entire team works seamlessly to ensure that your expectations become reality.Impeccable service and creative menus by our culinary team compliment every event.No event is too big or too small for Suntec SingaporeConvention and Exhibition Centre It is our great pleasure to welcome you to Singapore in November 2014 as we jointly host the 10th IDF-WPR 2014 Congress and 6th AASD Scientific Meeting. The global epidemic of diabetes is a most serious medical and social problem in all parts of the world including the Western Pacific Region, which has the highest prevalence of diabe Continue reading >>

More Than 400,000 People In Singapore Have Diabetes

More Than 400,000 People In Singapore Have Diabetes

More than 400,000 people in Singapore have diabetes Singapore is known as a fitness freak country as people pay special attention to their health and go for regular work-outs. But behind this attractive veil, there is also a reality that silent killer disease diabetes is also effecting Singaporeans. More than 400,000 people in Singapore have diabetes, reveals study. Of this group, one in three does not even know that he or she has the disease. More than 400,000 people in Singapore are suffering with diabetes.Photo courtesy: healthaim A study by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2015 revealed that Singapore has the second-highest proportion of diabetics among developed nations. Doctors blame the Western culture that is prevalent in Singapore for this trend. "Singaporeans today are more sedentary and consume diets high in calories, just like the Americans," said Dr Stanley Liew, an endocrinologist at the Raffles Diabetes and Endocrine Centre, while talking to a daily. In addition to this, there is also the risk of cancer for the people who are suffering with diabetes. While diabetes and cancer are different diseases, studies have shown their close link. People who have long-term type 2 diabetes (five years or more) have a 50 per cent higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer, said Dr Yong Wei Peng, associate director (research) and senior consultant at National University Cancer Institute, Singapore. However, the cancer can also cause diabetes, which is sometimes an early sign of a tumour in the pancreas, he added. Regular workout and healthy diet are keys to avoid diabetes. Photo courtesy:wikihealth About a quarter of pancreatic cancer patients have diabetes at the point of diagnosis and approximately two in five have pre-diabetes (higher than normal blood gl Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What Is It And What's The Singapore Scenario? - Healthxchange

Diabetes: What Is It And What's The Singapore Scenario? - Healthxchange

Diabetes: What Is It and What's the Singapore Scenario? Diabetes: What Is It and What's the Singapore Scenario? Dr Teh Ming Ming, Senior Consultant from the Department of Endocrinology at Singapore General Hospital, a member of SingHealth group, shares facts about diabetes in Singapore and more. occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or can't use insulin properly. Diabetes is a condition characterised by high glucose levels.Glucosecomes fromour food and isalsoproduced in the liver. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body's cells and is transported through the blood stream. Glucose needs to enter cells to be used. Insulin is the hormone that acts like a 'key' to allow glucose to enter cells. This uptake of glucose usually takes place in the liver and muscles. If the pancreas does not produce insulin, glucose is not able to enter the cells. Glucose levels in the blood stream rise, resulting in diabetes, says Dr Teh Ming Ming , Senior Consultant, at the Department of Endocrinology , Singapore General Hospital (SGH), a member of the SingHealth group. Glucose is a type of sugar that our body uses for energy required to perform body functions. Glucose is present in our body at all times, even while sleeping, since all cells need glucose for energy. Without diabetes, glucose levels are kept very tightly between 4.0-6.0 mmol/L. However, once diabetes develops, it becomes challenging to keep glucose levels within this range whilst avoiding frequent hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose). Glucose comes largely from carbohydrates (simple sugar and starches). Upon absorption from the digestive tract into the blood stream, it moves into the tissue fluid and eventually into the cells. Glucose that is not used immediately for energy is stored in the liver. Importan Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Singapore: How The Growing Epidemic Affects Your Future

Diabetes In Singapore: How The Growing Epidemic Affects Your Future

Home Health & Fitness Medical Diabetes in Singapore: How the growing epidemic affects your future Diabetes in Singapore: How the growing epidemic affects your future Updated on 1st November 2016 by Jessamy Smit | Diabetes has become one of the most prevalent diseases in the world, and in many countries, the number of people with the disease is growing at an alarming rate largely due to poor diet and a lifestyle that promotes spending long times sitting or not moving. At first glance, almost all of the information and news around diabetes talks about the US and growing problems in the UK. While the US does lead the world in the number of cases of diabetes, it has become a problem of growing concern for all parties from doctors to the government to even health insurance providers -in Singapore. Because diabetes has become a large concern in Singapore, it is important to know more about the disease, what is being done to curb it, and finally the impact it can have on one of the most necessary elements for expats in Singapore: their health insurance. While it can be hard to accurately pinpoint just how many people have this disease, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) puts the number at around 387 million worldwide, with just over 500,000 people aged between 20 and 79 having the disease in Singapore (as of 2014). According to statistics on the SingHealth website , the percentage of people with diabetes in Singapore was just 4.7% in 1984. Now, according to the IDF, its prevalence is almost 13% among those aged 20 to 79. This is a fairly large growth that is forecasted to exponentially increase if nothing is done, While the prevalence is quite high, it becomes even more worrying when you look at the comparison chart on the IDFs website . It shows that for people 40 a Continue reading >>

Singapore 'has 2nd-highest Proportion Of Diabetics'

Singapore 'has 2nd-highest Proportion Of Diabetics'

Singapore has the second-highest proportion of diabetics among developed nations, a new report by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) revealed. It said 10.53 per cent of people in Singapore aged between 20 and 79 are estimated to have the chronic disease, after correcting for age differences between the countries. Only the United States fared worse, with a percentage of 10.75. These results are worrying but not surprising, according to local doctors, as Singaporeans are becoming less active and eating more high-calorie diets, both of which increase the risk of diabetes. "As our nation becomes more developed, our lifestyle also changes," said Dr Stanley Liew, an endocrinologist at the Raffles Diabetes and Endocrine Centre. "Singaporeans today are more sedentary and consume diets high in calories, just like the Americans." The IDF's estimates for Singapore are similar to 2010 figures from the Ministry of Health, which report the diabetes prevalence for those aged between 18 and 69 at 11.3 per cent, or around one in 10 people. Although Asian people can look thin, we actually have a much higher percentage of body fat as compared with our Western counterparts. DR BEN NG, vice-president of the Diabetic Society of Singapore This is an increase from 4.7 per cent in 1984 and 9 per cent in 2004. Topping the overall charts in the IDF's report were island nations with relatively small populations, such as Mauritius, where nearly one in five people has diabetes. At the bottom were African nations such as Senegal, where only two in 100 people are estimated to have the disease. "(The latter) is partly due to their higher prevalence of other diseases and lower life expectancy," said the IDF in a statement. In the report, Singapore is ranked 62nd overall. Last year, it ranked 6 Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes: What You Dont Know And How To Manage Them

Living With Diabetes: What You Dont Know And How To Manage Them

Living With Diabetes: What You Dont Know And How To Manage Them Early detection is the key. Close to one-third of all people with diabetes are unaware they even have the disease. Thinking about diseases and debating whether you should go for a health screening even when you feel perfectly fine is hardly the way most people envision spending their free time or weekends doing. Dubbed Asias silent killer, Type 2 diabetes could change your mind as its symptoms are often overlooked at the early stage. This is because they are relatively inconspicuous including experiencing fatigue, blurry vision, hunger and thirst, numbness in limbs and having slow to heal wounds. Across the globe, the rate of diabetes has nearly quadrupled to 422 million in 2014 from 108 million in the 1980s . In Singapore, this problem has also seen rising notoriety, with the International Diabetes Federation revealing the country has the worlds second highest percentage of population with the chronic disease among developed nations . Further, diabetes is also the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Singapore.4 This is part of the reason Health Minister Gan Kim Yong declared war on diabetes in 2016. As World Health Day approaches on 7 April 2017, here are three things you need to know to take more control of the disease. # 1 Healthy people can still be afflicted by the disease While it is true that people most at risk of contracting diabetes are often overweight, over 40 or with a family history of the disease, increasingly, even healthy people between 30 and 40 years old and young children are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Often, people wrongly assume that because they are fit or do not feel ill, they cannot have diabetes. Oblivious that they may have the disease, they go on with t Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Federation - Centres Of Education

International Diabetes Federation - Centres Of Education

An International Diabetes Federation Centre for Education is a diabetes institution/member organization designated by IDF to form part of an international collaborative voluntary network to initiate, coordinate, facilitate and conduct high quality education for multidisciplinary healthcare professionals in diabetes and other related chronic diseases. To be eligible to become an IDF Diabetes Education Centre, the institution/member organization must provide evidence of the following criteria: Willingness to play a key role in the vision and contribute to the implementation of the IDF Global Education Strategic Plan Written commitment of leadership to support the IDF School of Diabetes, D-NET, Best of IDF, IDF School Fellow programme and related education initiatives. Commitment to work closely with and act as a reference point for the IDF Education Team and/or the IDF Policy and Programme Department. Willingness to accept and support review and assessment processes by IDF. Willingness to abide by IDF values and beliefs. Applicant institutions/member organizations must have: Established training programmes and proven experience in conducting health professional education programmes at basic and advanced levels and/or people living with diabetes, in either diabetes or other related chronic diseases. Existing linkages with local diabetes association(s). Any other existing linkages with international organizations. Proven commitment to the philosophy of a multidisciplinary team. The institution must be staffed by an integrated multidisciplinary team and have established groups that plan the multidisciplinary training. Adequate in-house or outsourced physical space and resources to conduct education programmes that also allow for an interactive workshop format . An annual fe Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The War Continues

Diabetes: The War Continues

The Ministry of Health (MOH) will continue in our efforts to motivate Singaporeans to take charge of their health, to live their lives free from diabetes. For those who have diabetes, we will help them to manage their condition well. 2Diabetes is a huge and growing burden for many countries across the world. Globally, more than 400 million adults lived with the condition in 2015 and this number is expected to rise to above 640 million, or one in ten adults by 2040 [1]. In Singapore, diabetes is a serious health concern, with over 400,000 Singaporeans living with the disease. One in three Singaporeans has a lifetime risk of getting diabetes and the number of those with diabetes is projected to reach one million by 2050, if current trends continue. In April 2016, MOH declared War on Diabetes to rally a whole-of-nation effort to reduce the burden of diabetes in our population and keep Singaporeans healthy as we age. 3Type 2 diabetes is preventable. Changes to lifestyle and dietary preferences can reduce ones risk of getting diabetes. The Health Promotion Board (HPB) has launched several initiatives to encourage the adoption of healthier meal options, such as the Healthier Dining Programme, Healthier Ingredient Development Scheme and the Healthier Choice Symbol identifier. [2] The ongoing Eat, Drink, Shop Healthy Campaign also serves to generate awareness and encourage consumers to adopt healthier food choices. 4To give further impetus to the War on Diabetes, the Diabetes Prevention and Care Taskforce has worked with beverage manufacturers [3] who have agreed to reduce the amount of sugar in packaged sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs). We are heartened to receive the strong support from industry players on sugar reduction efforts. The seven industry leaders Coca-Cola, F&N Fo Continue reading >>

Three Things You Must Know About Diabetes

Three Things You Must Know About Diabetes

Three Things You Must Know About Diabetes Three Things You Must Know About Diabetes In conjunction with World Diabetes Day (14 November), here arethree things you must know about diabetes. 01 | Singapore has the second highest percentage of diabetics among developed nations According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), 1 out of 10 Singaporeans aged between 20 and 79 have diabetes. At age 65 and above, this number rises to an astounding1 in 3 . Here is a comparison of the prevalence in Singapore as compared to the world and to the Western Pacific region. As you can see, the rates in Singapore areclose to almost double in certain age groups as compared to the world and the Western Pacific region. The rise of diabetes in Singapore is a growing concern. Without any intervention now, these numbers are set to rise toclose to 1 million by 2050. The increasing prevalence of diabetes, which is one of the biggest expenditures of our health care system, has led Health MinisterGan Kim Yong to declare war on the medical condition. 02 | 1 in 3 diabetics were unaware that they had diabetes Of the more than 400,000 diabetics in Singapore, 1 in 3 were unaware that they had the condition. If left undetected, untreated, or poorly managed, it is a debilitating condition that has severe life-long consequences. It can lead to a series of serious complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and lower limb amputations. In Singapore, four lose a limb or appendage every day due to complications from the medical condition. Over 90% of diabetics suffer from Type 2 diabetes, whichis a largely preventable condition . Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease that results from the way we choose to eat, move, and live. Lifestyle factors such as physical inactivity Continue reading >>

Diabetes: A Big Problem In Singapore

Diabetes: A Big Problem In Singapore

I’m ashamed to say this, but I had no idea how big of a problem diabetes was in Singapore until I saw a report in early December 2015 that showed the Republic has one of the highest proportion of diabetics in the world. In fact, according to the report, we’re number two on the list, just behind the United States – at least according to the survey by the International Diabetes Federation. The survey stated that about 10.53 percent of people here aged between 20 and 79 are diabetic. In the US, this figure is 10.75 percent. It reminded me of an article I read the month before, published by the newspaper TODAY, on World Diabetes Day, which falls on November 25. The report was on the speech given that day by Dr Amy Khor, who is the Senior Minister of State for Health. Wanting to find out if the survey’s results were credible, I went back to the report and even looked through, in more detail, the original speech that was posted on the Health Ministry’s website. Figures given by Dr Khor in the speech seemed to back up the survey’s findings – in fact, they were even higher: Between 1992 and 2010, prevalence of diabetes in Singapore grew from 8.6 percent to 11.3 percent, she said. Something else struck me in her speech, however- diabetes among the young in Singapore is also up. Although Dr Khor did not give any numbers, it got me concerned enough to dig a little more on my own. I found a Channel News Asia report from April 2015 that had this worrying headline: “3 in 10 Singaporeans have diabetes before turning 40”. In a local study of type-2 diabetes across nine Asian territories, including Thailand, Hong Kong, India, and China, Singapore had the highest proportion of younger diabetes patients, said the report. Type-2 diabetes, as I learnt, is what most diabeti Continue reading >>

Mci And Moh Battle Diabetes With A New Campaign

Mci And Moh Battle Diabetes With A New Campaign

MCI and MOH battle diabetes with a new campaign The Ministry of Communications and Information (MCI) and the Ministry of Health (MOH) have launched a nationwide campaign rallying Singaporeans to beat diabetes by making a positive change in their diet and lifestyle. This was donewith the help of Tribal Worldwide Singapore. Launched by health minister, Gan Kim Yong, on World diabetes day, the campaign is rooted in one simple truththat if you dont watch your diet and exercise regularly, you may trigger a chain reaction of bad habits.This might eventually lead to diabetes and its complications. To kick-start the campaign, a series of six television commercials (TVCs) will be aired on television channels, in the four official languages. Supporting the TVCs will be large installations, bus wrap and screenings on OOH billboards. Social media will also be used to extent the campaigns reach to audiences in the digital space. According to statistics released by the International Diabetes Federation, Singapore has the second-highest proportion of diabetics among developed nations. At the rate the numbers are growing, it is estimated that by 2050, as many as 1 million Singaporeans may suffer from diabetes. Jeff Cheong, president of Tribal Worldwide Asia, said, Diabetes is a serious problem in Singapore, but we can all take steps to prevent and manage the condition. This is every Singaporeans fight, as it affects not just the afflicted, but their families too. We hope that our effort inspires a chain reaction for positive change. Continue reading >>

10th International Diabetes Federation - Western Pacific Region Congress (10th Idp-wpr Congress 2014)

10th International Diabetes Federation - Western Pacific Region Congress (10th Idp-wpr Congress 2014)

10th International Diabetes Federation - Western Pacific Region Congress (10th IDP-WPR Congress 2014) Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre IDF-WPR Congress 2014: The definitive medical forum in the Western Pacific Region on the care, prevention and treatment of diabetes. Hosted by the Diabetic Society of Singapore, the 10th International Diabetes Federation-Western Pacific Region (IDF-WPF) Congress 2014 will be held from 21 to 24 November in Singapore. The continuing battle against diabetes requires an alliance of people with diabetes, healthcare professionals, scientists and policy makers. As a federation comprising 28 diabetes-related societies and associations in Asia Pacific, the IDF-WPR Congress is the leading platform for learning and cooperation in the field of diabetes in the region. The 10th IDF-WPR Congress 2014 will be jointly held with the 6th Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) Meeting. The AASD comprises of academic societies, associations and members from East and Southeast Asia, and the AASD meeting is held annually, with the aim to improve levels of clinical and basic research on diabetes in the region. Continue reading >>

History And Current Activities Of The International Diabetes Federation-western Pacific Region (idf-wpr).

History And Current Activities Of The International Diabetes Federation-western Pacific Region (idf-wpr).

History and current activities of the International Diabetes Federation-Western Pacific Region (IDF-WPR). IDF-WPR Office, Kobe International Conference Center, Japan. International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is one of the biggest non-governmental organizations with its 44-year history since 1950. In 1993, 114 diabetes associations in 96 countries participated in the IDF. In 1982, it was decided to divide the globe into seven regions and to promote the diagnosis, treatment, care and education of diabetes based on the environment, natural features, culture and race of the each region. On January 24, 1984, the IDF-WPR establishment meeting was held in Melbourne, Australia, with eight original member countries (Australia, New Zealand, Korea, The Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Fiji and Japan). In 1993, 13 diabetes associations in 12 countries joined the IDF-WPR. New member associations are from China (Beijing and Taipei), Hong Kong, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. The IDF-WPR has been holding congresses and council meetings every 3 or 4 years since 1984 as well as formulating strategic action plans in the scientific, clinical, health care and education fields of diabetes. Continue reading >>

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

The US has the highest prevalence of diabetes among all developed countries across the world, new data reveals. Almost 11 per cent of Americans between the ages of 20 and 79 suffers from the disease, according to data from the International Diabetes Federation. That’s an estimated 30 million adults across the country. Such is the scale of the issue in the US, the country had nearly two-thirds the total number of cases of all the other 37 developed nations combined, experts warned. In contrast, those nations have a total of 46 million cases between them. The International Diabetes Federation has revealed the US tops the league tables of developing countries with the highest prevalence of the disease, with 10.75 per cent of adults suffering type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Singapore and Malta come in second and third place PREVALENCE OF DIABETES IN ADULTS AGE 20-79 IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES Top Ten - Highest prevalence % Bottom Ten - Lowest prevalence % 1. United States 10.75 1. Lithuania 3.97 2. Singapore 10.53 2. Estonia 4.37 3. Malta 9.92 3. Ireland 4.39 4. Portugal 9.86 4. Sweden 4.7 5. Cyprus 9.55 5. Luxembourg 4.73 6. Andorra 8.52 6. United Kingdom 4.73 7. Slovenia 7.77 7. Australia 5.06 8. Slovakia 7.76 8. Belgium 5.09 9. Spain 7.7 9. Italy 5.12 10. Israel 7.46 10. Greece 5.16 Experts said the high number of people in the US suffering diabetes, is in large part, due to the number living with type 2 diabetes. The condition is closely linked to obesity. Dr Petra Wilson, the CEO of IDF, called on governments to take actions, including introducing taxes on unhealthy food and drink to try and curb the obesity epidemic. He said: 'As rates of type 2 diabetes increase in many countries around the world, we urgently need preventative action. 'IDF asks governments to lead the way i Continue reading >>

Idf Annual Report 2015 By International Diabetes Federation - Issuu

Idf Annual Report 2015 By International Diabetes Federation - Issuu

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is anumbrella organisation of over 230 national diabetesassociations in 170 countries and territories. Itrepresents the interests of the growing numberof people with diabetes and those at risk. TheFederation has been leading the global diabetescommunity since 1950. IDF€™s greatest strength lies in the capacity of itsmembership and the ability to ground globaladvocacy in the reality of local experience. OurMembers provide a large volunteering force toensure we can achieve our strategic objectives,particularly in low- and middle-income countrieswhere the Federation has a strong presence. IDF is unique in being a federation of not-for-profitorganisations dedicated to action on diabetes, andas such forms the largest civil society organisationin the world serving people with and affectedby diabetes. IDF Members are organised at both global andregional level, in which Members belong to both theIDF at global level and are also grouped together ata regional level. Accordingly IDF has seven regionalgroups, which provide the opportunity for IDFMembers within a geographical region to engage incollaborative action to improve the lives of peoplewith diabetes. IDF is the legitimate voice of the global diabetescommunity. The Federation continues to grow,both in terms a growing membership base, butalso in terms of engagement at a global level withthe World Health Organisation (WHO) and UnitedNations (UN). Our vision:Living in a world without diabetes. Our mission:To be the leading, authoritative global voicefor people with diabetes and those at riskof diabetes, and improve the quality of lifeof all people with diabetes, prevent type 2diabetes and fight discrimination againstall affected by diabetes. Message from the president 2 Continue reading >>

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