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Diabetes In Asia And The Pacific: Implications For The Global Epidemic

Diabetes In Asia And The Pacific: Implications For The Global Epidemic

The last three decades have witnessed an epidemic rise in the number of people with diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, and particularly in developing countries, where more than 80% of the people with diabetes live. The rise of type 2 diabetes in South Asia is estimated to be more than 150% between 2000 and 2035. Although aging, urbanization, and associated lifestyle changes are the major determinants for the rapid increase, an adverse intrauterine environment and the resulting epigenetic changes could also contribute in many developing countries. The International Diabetes Federation estimated that there were 382 million people with diabetes in 2013, a number surpassing its earlier predictions. More than 60% of the people with diabetes live in Asia, with almost one-half in China and India combined. The Western Pacific, the world’s most populous region, has more than 138.2 million people with diabetes, and the number may rise to 201.8 million by 2035. The scenario poses huge social and economic problems to most nations in the region and could impede national and, indeed, global development. More action is required to understand the drivers of the epidemic to provide a rationale for prevention strategies to address the rising global public health “tsunami.” Unless drastic steps are taken through national prevention programs to curb the escalating trends in all of the countries, the social, economic, and health care challenges are likely to be insurmountable. Introduction Diabetes is now a disease of major concern both globally and regionally and is a leading cause of death in most countries (1). In 2013, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated that ∼382 million people had diabetes worldwide, and by 2035, this was predicted to rise to 592 million. Continue reading >>

The Global Prevalence And Incidence Of Diabetes Mellitus And Pulmonary Tuberculosis

The Global Prevalence And Incidence Of Diabetes Mellitus And Pulmonary Tuberculosis

The Global Prevalence and Incidence of Diabetes Mellitus and Pulmonary Tuberculosis 1 Department of Diabetes, Clinical County Emergency Hospital, Craiova, Romania 2 University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Craiova, Romania Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and Tuberculosis (TB) are two chronic diseases which have a major impact on the population health in developing countries. DM is a chronic, noncommunicable disease, characterized by hyperglycemia, caused by insulin-resistance, inadequate insulin secretion or both. TB is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an airborne bacteria. DM implies a three times greater risk of developing TB and their association can be considered one of the most important challenges regarding TB control. TB can cause a temporary impaired glucose tolerance, which is a risk factor for DM development. The possibility of relapse or death of a patient with TB is significantly higher when the patient also has DM. The DM-TB association represents an important threat to the population health and requires the implementation of adequate programs in order to reduce the prevalence and incidence of the two diseases. 1. Morton R. Phthisiologia: or a treatise of consumptions. London: Smith and Walford, 1694. 2. Rajalakshmi S, Veluchamy G. Yugi's pramegam and diabetes mellitus: an analogue. Bull Indian Inst Hist Med Hyderabad 29: 8387, 1999. 3. Harries AD, Satyanarayana S, Kumar AMV et al. Epidemiology and interaction of diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis and challenges for care: a review. Public Health Action 3 [Suppl 1]: S3-S9, 2013. 4. Dooley KE, Chaisson RE. Tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus: convergence of two epidemics. Lancet Infect Dis 9: 737-746, 2009. 5. Ponce-De-Leon A, Garcia-Garcia Md Mde L, Garcia-Sancho MC et al. Tuberculosis and diabetes in sout Continue reading >>

Members

Members

Since 1972, there were several independent groups of health care professionals and people with diabetes in several cities in Indonesia with certain activities on diabetes education and diabetes care. In 1986, they decided to merge as a national organisation. These groups of people founded Persatuan Diabetes Indonesia (Indonesia Diabetes Association) as a non-profit, non governmental organisation. The Association at this moment has 10 Regions, 106 Chapters, and 200 Units/Hospitals all over Indonesia. Leading the fight against diabetes in Indonesia To promote diabetes care through awareness, prevention, education and management To provide for the benefit of and to be of service to all people with diabetes and others interested in diabetes To raise funds to provide assistance to poor and needy children and eligible adults to better control their diabetes To organize and participate in conferences, seminars, forums, camps, courses, exhibitions and workshops To compile, print, publish and distribute printed materials on diabetes and related fields PERSADIA organize activities, such as talks, seminars health screening, camps and counseling to help the people with diabetes and the public to increase the awareness of diabetes. Regions and Chapters organize every year National Diabetes Meetings and Workshop as part of the continuing medical education programme for health care professionals. PERSADIA organizes the World Diabetes Day Celebrations jointly with the Regions and Chapters . The activities included Diabetes Walks, exhibitions, health screening, counseling and games. PERSADIA members routinely meet every week doing diabetes gymnastics in units/groups in their respective areas. Prof Sidartawan Soegondo "We are proud to be part of the IDF because we are able to share our Continue reading >>

Indonesia Urged To Guard Against New Co-epidemic: Tuberculosis And Diabetes | Jakarta Globe

Indonesia Urged To Guard Against New Co-epidemic: Tuberculosis And Diabetes | Jakarta Globe

Indonesia Urged to Guard Against New Co-Epidemic: Tuberculosis and Diabetes A state medic conducts a quick check up on a sanitation worker as part of the governments efforts to detect tuberculosis and other life-threatening communicable diseases. (JG Photo/Fajrin Raharjo) A state medic conducts a quick check up on a sanitation worker as part of the governments efforts to detect tuberculosis and other life-threatening communicable diseases. (JG Photo/Fajrin Raharjo) Barcelona. Experts are advising countries struggling with the large presence of tuberculosis and diabetes to screen all patients diagnosed with either disease in order to fight against a growing co-epidemic. Indonesia is right up here in tuberculosis and right up there with diabetes as well, so it would be very nice if Indonesia did something like what they did in India, Dr. Anthony Harries, senior advisor to The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, told the Jakarta Globe at the 45th Union World Conference on Lung Health in Barcelona, Spain. A study released by the International Diabetes Federation published in 2014 projected that in Indonesia would rank sixth among 10 countries with the highest burden of diabetes by 2035, with 14.1 million people in the country between the ages of 29 and 79 suffering from the metabolic disease. The World Health Organization has already placed Indonesia in the top four of countries with the most cases of tuberculosis after China, India and South Africa. Nearly a half million people are estimated to be infected with the lung disease across the archipelago. Harries said Indonesia should consider conducting bidirectional screening for patients of both tuberculosis and diabetes. Warning symptoms for diabetics who may have contracted tuberculosis would be pr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Clinical Practice Guidelines (cpgs) For The Asean Region: Country Initiatives For Collectively Enhanced Diabetes Care In The Region | Paz-pacheco | Journal Of The Asean Federation Of Endocrine Societies

Diabetes Clinical Practice Guidelines (cpgs) For The Asean Region: Country Initiatives For Collectively Enhanced Diabetes Care In The Region | Paz-pacheco | Journal Of The Asean Federation Of Endocrine Societies

Journal of the ASEAN Federation of Endocrine Societies Diabetes Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for the ASEAN region: Country Initiatives for Collectively Enhanced Diabetes Care in the Region The prevalence of diabetes in the region is clearly increasing, and so is the burden of this chronic disease and its complications. The Philippines reports a true prevalence of about 7.2% among adults aged 20 years and older in 2008;1 in the 2010 International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore report 4.6%, 10.9% and 12.7% prevalence rates, respectively.2These rates are consistent with global estimates, and considering the increasing populations in these countries, the absolute numbers are certainly staggering. Through improvement in diabetes care, diabetes complications can be prevented or delayed. Various strategies at early screening, diagnosis, and appropriate interventions have demonstrated improved outcomes in several populations. However, the practice of diabetes care is far from uniform and optimal in most of the developing countries in the ASEAN region. Specialized care is mostly confined to city centers, with minimal reach to financially challenged underserved communities. Efforts to enhance and increase access to quality care are therefore imperative. Such efforts include the development and deployment of Clinical Practice Guidelines (or CPGs). CPGs provide recommendations to define standards of care. When properly developed and deployed, CPGs are expected to provide the best possible care to the greater majority of the population. This issue features CPGs for diabetes of the AFES countries, with reports from Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. These four DM CPGs vary in their scope. The Indonesian and Philippine CPGs Continue reading >>

Indonesia Snapshot: Access To Diabetes Care In Bali

Indonesia Snapshot: Access To Diabetes Care In Bali

Elizabeth Snouffer Editor, Diabetes Voice at International Diabetes Federation Indonesia Snapshot: access to diabetes care in Bali (repost From Diabetes Voice, July 2017 ) According to IDFs Diabetes Atlas (2015), approximately 10 million adult Indonesians (20 to 79 years old) live with diabetes and as many as 6 million adults live with undiagnosed diabetes, making Indonesias diabetes population the seventh largest in the world.With a country population recorded currently at 263 million, and a prevalence of diabetes estimated at 6-7%, the number of Indonesians with type 2 diabetes will likely increase by half if not double by 2040.The Diabetes Atlas does not have data to report on the number of cases of type 1 diabetes in Indonesia. Bali, a popular island and province of Indonesia, is almost solely dependent upon tourism for its economy but behind the palm trees and coastal glamour, a large proportion of more than 4.2 million people live on $146 US dollars per week minimum wage.Thats about $20 a day. Dr. Ketut Suastika, Professor of Medicine specializing in endocrinology, and President of Udayana University (Denpasar, Bali), knows more about diabetes than perhaps anyone else on the island. He offers me access to his diabetes team of medical professionals at Sanglah Hospital, the largest out of 33 government hospitals in Bali. Dr. Ketut Suastika with fellow resident internists. Dr. Suastika spends a good deal of his time administrating, teaching resident internists and fellows about clinical diabetes care and overseeing the most difficult cases.His leadership work with the Indonesian Ministry of Health helped push forward government initiatives including medical assistance which provides all required analog insulins to people with diabetes for free. According to Dr. Susa Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Basic Facts Epidemiology Of Diabetes

Diabetes: Basic Facts Epidemiology Of Diabetes

Abstract The disease burden related to diabetes is high and rising in every country, fuelled by the global rise in the prevalence of obesity and unhealthy lifestyles. The latest estimates show a global prevalence of 382 million people with diabetes in 2013, expected to rise to 592 million by 2035. The aetiological classification of diabetes has now been widely accepted. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the two main types, with type 2 diabetes accounting for the majority (>85%) of total diabetes prevalence. Both forms of diabetes can lead to multisystem complications of microvascular endpoints, including retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular endpoints including ischaemic heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. The premature morbidity, mortality, reduced life expectancy and financial and other costs of diabetes make it an important public health condition. Type 1 diabetes The acute onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus and its rapid presentation to medical attention facilitates accurate registering of new cases. Provided ascertainment can be verified, these data can be combined with population denominator data to give age-specific and sex-specific incidences. Geographical variation The incidence of type 1 diabetes in children varies nearly 400-fold between countries (Figure 1) with age-adjusted incidence rates ranging from 0.1 per 100,000 per year in parts of Venezuela and China to 37.8 in Sardinia and 40.9 per 100,000/year in Finland.1 The high rate observed in Sardinia is notably discordant with the incidence in Italy as a whole. Incidence also varies within several other countries including China, where there is a 12-fold variation by region (0.13–1.61/100,000). In general, countries in Europe and North America have either high or interm Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Indonesia: What Medicines Do Physicians Prefer?

Diabetes In Indonesia: What Medicines Do Physicians Prefer?

mClinica is a data, analytics, and marketing platform for healthcare companies in Asia's emerging markets. mClinica provides data, analytics services, and patient engagement tools for healthcare organizations in Asia's emerging markets. In mClinica Insights, we publish regular research based on our work. As concerns mount about Indonesias growing diabetes epidemic, many organizations are working to increase awareness and improve treatment of the disease. Yet good data on the burden of diabetes and patient treatment pathways remains limited. mClinica has several datasets that can help. One such dataset is based on a longitudinal sample of prescription information that we collected from a panel of pharmacies in Jakarta over the past year. These prescriptions contain a rich trove of information about how diabetes and other conditions are being identified and treated in the private healthcare market. They shed light on epidemiological trends and prescribing habits in Indonesias largest and most important city. To gain an initial look at the state of diabetes treatment in Jakarta, we recently pulled data from the first quarter of 2016. As one might expect, the data shows that older OADs are more commonly prescribed than any other kind of diabetes medicine. Classic therapies like metformin and suphonylurea (SU) medicines are typically preferred because they are proven to be effective and relatively inexpensive. For most older therapies, physicians in Jakarta tend to prescribe generics. In our sample, generic metformin and glimepiride accounted for over a quarter of all prescriptions. Branded medicines by Merck and Sanofi still had strong prescription share, but this may erode over time. Compared to older therapies, newer therapies in the gliptin segment have smaller share of Continue reading >>

Plants And Herbs For Therapy Of Diabetes | Pramono | Medical Journal Of Indonesia

Plants And Herbs For Therapy Of Diabetes | Pramono | Medical Journal Of Indonesia

Soewondo P, Ferrario A, Tahapary DL. Challenges in diabetes management in Indonesia: a literature review. Global Health. 2013;9:63. Guariguata L, Nolan T, Beagley J, Linnenkamp U, Jacqmain O. IDF Diabetes Atlas. 6th ed. International Diabetes Federation; 2013. Misita CP. Clinical pharmacist in outpatient diabetes care: essential members of the multidisciplinary team. Clin Diabetes. 2013;31(4):162-5. Bayless M, Martin C. The team approach to intensive diabetes management. Diabetes Spectr. 1998;11(1):33-7. Zhang J, Burridge L, Baxter KA, Donald M, Foster MM, Hollingworth SA, et al. A new model of integrated primary-secondary care for complex diabetes in the community: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials. 2013;14:382. Pramono LA, Fanumbi C. Permasalahan lanjut usia di daerah perdesaan terpencil. Jurnal Kesmas. 2012;6(5):201-11. Indonesian. Aikins AG. Healer shopping in Africa: new evidence from rural-urban qualitative study of Ghanaian diabetes experiences. BMJ. 2005;331:737. Gill G, Gebrekidan A, English P, Wile D, Tesfaye S. Diabetic complications and glycaemic control in remote North Africa. QJM. 2008;101(10):793-8. Kalra S. Recent advances in pathophysiology of diabetes: beyond the dirty dozen. J Pak Med Assoc. 2013;63(2):277-80. DeFronzo RA. Current issues in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Overview of newer agents: where treatment is going. Am J Med. 2010;123(3 Suppl):S38-48. Cefalu WT, Stephens JM, Ribnicky DM. Diabetes and herbal (botanical) medicine. In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, editors. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd ed. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press; 2011. Grise DE, McAllister HM, Langland J. Improved clinical outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing integrative medicine: a case report. Glob A Continue reading >>

Idf Annual Report 2015 By International Diabetes Federation - Issuu

Idf Annual Report 2015 By International Diabetes Federation - Issuu

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is anumbrella organisation of over 230 national diabetesassociations in 170 countries and territories. Itrepresents the interests of the growing numberof people with diabetes and those at risk. TheFederation has been leading the global diabetescommunity since 1950. IDF€™s greatest strength lies in the capacity of itsmembership and the ability to ground globaladvocacy in the reality of local experience. OurMembers provide a large volunteering force toensure we can achieve our strategic objectives,particularly in low- and middle-income countrieswhere the Federation has a strong presence. IDF is unique in being a federation of not-for-profitorganisations dedicated to action on diabetes, andas such forms the largest civil society organisationin the world serving people with and affectedby diabetes. IDF Members are organised at both global andregional level, in which Members belong to both theIDF at global level and are also grouped together ata regional level. Accordingly IDF has seven regionalgroups, which provide the opportunity for IDFMembers within a geographical region to engage incollaborative action to improve the lives of peoplewith diabetes. IDF is the legitimate voice of the global diabetescommunity. The Federation continues to grow,both in terms a growing membership base, butalso in terms of engagement at a global level withthe World Health Organisation (WHO) and UnitedNations (UN). Our vision:Living in a world without diabetes. Our mission:To be the leading, authoritative global voicefor people with diabetes and those at riskof diabetes, and improve the quality of lifeof all people with diabetes, prevent type 2diabetes and fight discrimination againstall affected by diabetes. Message from the president 2 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Will Cost The Nation Dearly Next Year

Diabetes Will Cost The Nation Dearly Next Year

Diabetes will cost the nation dearly next year Jakarta |Thu, September 5, 2013 | 08:41 am The increasing number of people suffering from diabetes could cost the nation at least Rp 5 trillion (US$438 million) by the time the universal healthcare program is implemented early next year, Hasbullah Tabrany, a professor of public health from the University of Indonesia's (UI) School of Public Health, said on Tuesday. Data from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) for 2012 showed that 371 million people worldwide had diabetes, half of which were undiagnosed. Also, 4.8 million people died from the disease, which is sometimes called the 'silent killer' due to the subtleness of its symptoms. Among nations, Indonesia ranked seventh in the world, with 7.6 million diabetics. Of that number, only 41 percent had been diagnosed with the disease, 39 percent had received treatment and a mere 1 percent took regular medication. 'We estimated that the financial burden caused by diabetes would be between Rp 5 trillion and Rp 8 trillion by the time universal healthcare coverage is implemented next year,' Hasbullah said during the launching of Blue Print For Change, a report on diabetes in Indonesia conducted by global healthcare subsidiary PT Novo Nordisk Indonesia, in cooperation with the Health Ministry. 'We get the figure by calculating the total expenditure for medicine and laboratory expenses for the 7.6 million diabetics who will be covered by the government,' he said. 'However, the calculation is incomplete because it doesn't take into account the loss in wages incurred when a patient is on sick leave. We also haven't calculated the productivity loss,' he said. Hasbullah said that diabetes ranked third in total healthcare spending, after cardiovascular disease and cancer, with Continue reading >>

Challenges In Diabetes Management In Indonesia: A Literature Review

Challenges In Diabetes Management In Indonesia: A Literature Review

Challenges in diabetes management in Indonesia: a literature review 1 Alessandra Ferrario ,2 and Dicky Levenus Tahapary 1 1Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine University of Indonesia, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia 1Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine University of Indonesia, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia 1Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine University of Indonesia, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia 2LSE Health, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, WC2A 2AE, London, UK Received 2013 Feb 20; Accepted 2013 Nov 11. Copyright 2013 Soewondo et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The expanding diabetes epidemic worldwide could have potentially devastating effects on the development of healthcare systems and economies in emerging countries, both in terms of direct health care costs and loss of working time and disability. This study aims to review evidence on the burden, expenditure, complications, treatment, and outcomes of diabetes in Indonesia and its implications on the current health system developments. We conducted a comprehensive literature review together with a review of unpublished data from the Ministry of Health and a public health insurer (Askes). Studies presenting evidence on prevalence, incidence, mortality, costs, co Continue reading >>

Indonesia Cohort Of Io Hat Study To Evaluate Diabetes Management, Control, And Complications In Retrospective And Prospective Periods Among Insulin-treated Patients With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes | Rudijanto | Acta Medica Indonesiana

Indonesia Cohort Of Io Hat Study To Evaluate Diabetes Management, Control, And Complications In Retrospective And Prospective Periods Among Insulin-treated Patients With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes | Rudijanto | Acta Medica Indonesiana

Indonesia Cohort of IO HAT Study to Evaluate Diabetes Management, Control, and Complications in Retrospective and Prospective Periods Among Insulin-Treated Patients with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Achmad Rudijanto, Made R Saraswati, Em Yunir, Poppy Kumala, Happy HS Puteri, Veny VV Mandang Background: hypoglycemia is a major adverse event of insulin therapy for diabetes mellitus patients. The study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of hypoglycemia among insulin treated patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the Indonesian cohort. Methods: this Indonesian cohort study consisted of retrospective and prospective evaluation of hypoglycemic episodes, using International Operations Hypoglycemia Assessment Tool (IO HAT) in 374 patients with diabetes (T1DM; n=17 or T2DM; n=357). The patients of 18 years of age and treated with insulin for >12 months were selected for this study (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02306681). Results: a total of 374 patients were enrolled in this study and completed SAQ1. All patients with T1DM (17 [100%]), and 347 (97.2%) patients with T2DM completed SAQ2. Almost all the patients in the 4-week prospective period reported at least one hypoglycemic event (T1DM 100%, T2DM 99.4%) and the incidence rate of any hypoglycemia was 67.5 events per patient-year (PPY) and 25.7 events PPY for T1DM and T2DM patients, respectively. Among patients with T1DM and T2DM, 5.9% and 36.4%, respectively, did not know what hypoglycemia was at baseline, also high proportion of patients had impaired hypoglycemic awareness in the study (82.4% and 62.7%, respectively). Conclusion: overall, high proportion of patients reported hypoglycemic events in the prospective period indicating under reporting during the retrospective period Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tipe 2 Paling Banyak Terjadi Pada Orang Indonesia

Diabetes Tipe 2 Paling Banyak Terjadi Pada Orang Indonesia

Diabetes Tipe 2 Paling Banyak Terjadi pada Orang Indonesia Fadli Adzani, CNN Indonesia | Rabu, 02/09/2015 12:54 WIB Jakarta, CNN Indonesia -- Penyakit diabetes, atau yang biasa disebut dengan "mother of all diseases", adalah penyakit yang disebabkan kadar gula darah tinggi. Jika dibiarkan, dapat menyebabkan munculnya penyakit komplikasi lain pada pengidapnya. "Diabetes Mellitus adalah ibu dari banyak penyakit, dapat merusak organ-organ penting dalam tubuh kita," kata Tri Juli Edi Tarigan, ahli penyakit dalam dan konsultan endokrin dari Rumah Sakit Cipto Mangunkusumo. Anda Akan Tidur Seperti Bayi Jika Sering Beraktivitas di Alam Saat ini, Indonesia masuk dalam daftar dari 10 negara pengidap diabetes tertinggi di dunia, menduduki peringkat ke-7. Edi mengatakan, jenis diabetes yang paling banyak dirasakan orang Indonesia adalah tipe yang kedua. Tahun lalu, menurut IDF (International Diabetes Federation), Indonesia memiliki sekitar 9,1 juta pengidap diabetes, diperkirakan pada 2035, jumlahnya akan mencapai 14,1 juta. Ia menambahkan, terdapat beberapa budaya orang Indonesia yang menyebabkan penyakit diabetes di Indonesia, seperti kurangnya olahraga, terlalu banyak makan dan berat badan berlebih (obesitas). "Sebenarnya, jika orang Indonesia menghindari hal-hal itu, mereka tak perlu khawatir akan penyakit Diabetes," ujar TJ, demikian Edi akrab disapa. Selain itu, kebiasaan orang Indonesia yang sudah diagnosis mengidap diabetes, biasanya mereka tidak minum obat secara rutin, telat kontrol gula darah, jarang kontrol kesehatan dan takut untuk menggunakan jarum insulin, hal-hal tersebutlah yang nantinya akan memperparah diabetes mereka, sehingga menimbulkan komplikasi. Lebih lanjut, TJ menyarankan, agar orang-orang yang mengidap penyakit diabetes, agar berolahraga seperti jogging Continue reading >>

Sun Life Financial Indonesia Helps To Fight Diabetes Mellitus In Support Of International Diabetes Month

Sun Life Financial Indonesia Helps To Fight Diabetes Mellitus In Support Of International Diabetes Month

Sun Life Financial Indonesia Helps to Fight Diabetes Mellitus in Support of International Diabetes Month According to Sun Life Asia Health Index 2015, diabetes is one of largely preventable nature of Indonesians top health concerns Rumah Sakit Cipto Mangunkusumo in cooperation with Sun Life Financial Indonesia establishes education clinic for patients with diabetes and their families to prevent the occurrence of complications. Jakarta, November 12, 2015 PT Sun Life Financial Indonesia (Sun Life, Company) today is pleased to announce that it supports the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism Department of Internal Medicine Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia (FKUI)/Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital (RSCM) to commemorate this years diabetes month by conducting a series of activities called International Diabetes Month 2015. This initiative aims to reduce the incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Indonesia and increase the quality of life of patients with DM. DM is a disease with a variety of chronic complications as indicated by increasing levels of sugar in the blood. Based on Indonesia Basic Health Research (RISKESDAS) in 2013, 6.9 percent of Indonesias population suffers from DM. November is an international celebration focused on raising awareness for all forms of diabetes, its signs and symptoms, and gain support for critical research toward preventing, better treating and curing all forms of the disease. . By supporting the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism Department of Internal FKUI/ RSCM in conducting a series of activities during the International Diabetes Month 2015, we really hope to help our customers, not only by providing health insurance products, but also by helping to prevent the disease. We know that DM is listed on critical illness Continue reading >>

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