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Intermittent Fasting Diabetes

Can Intermittent Fasting Improve Diabetes?

Can Intermittent Fasting Improve Diabetes?

Fasting, unless you're a religious person and doing it for a holiday, seems like an extreme thing to do. After all, to properly function in life, even if you are overweight and have diabetes, you need calories to help you concentrate at work, walk down the street, pick up kids (both physically and in a car), and lots of other everyday functions. But "light" fasting or fasting at irregular intervals ('intermittent') can help with Type 2 Diabetes. Numerous studies support this method of fasting. Here's the basic idea: limiting your caloric intake every other day, or 2-3 days a week, or even refraining from food calories altogether one day a week can help with weight loss, increase gluten sensitivity, improve cardiovascular disease. It's even as effective as bariatric surgery in obese individuals. Some nutritionists suggest that those trying to control blood sugar levels and keep energy steady throughout the day should eat three balanced meals at regular times every day. That can still be a valuable strategy in combating fluctuating blood glucose levels and alertness at work. But you don't have to eat, say, a big breakfast every day. Do you notice how on some days you're hungrier than others? And hungrier at certain times of the day than others? A TRUE PALEO DIET...the original fast? No doubt you've heard by now of the popular Paleo Diet, which eliminates grains, pasteurized dairy products like pizza and every baked good, among other things. The theory goes that if the food wasn't around during caveman times, don't eat it. True Paleo Diets didn't have 3 regularly scheduled meals per day. There were no drive-throughs, of course, 10,000 years ago. Paleolithic-era inhabitants lived by the feast and times of famine (fasting not by choice). Kill a sabertooth tiger and voila, fo Continue reading >>

What Is Intermittent Fasting?

What Is Intermittent Fasting?

A few weeks ago, I got a message from Jane Sandwood, a nutritionist who believes in intermittent fasting. I asked her to explain it for all of us – and to explain how it might be beneficial to those of us with diabetes. Disclaimer: This is not dietary advice and you should not make any changes to your diet without consulting your doctor. I’ve been a nutritionist for ten years, and I’ve learned two things. Firstly, dieting is not the solution to being out of shape or overweight, and secondly, everyone’s bodies are different. For example, a well-balanced, but restricted diet and exercise works for me, but my husband has found a fasting regime mixed with exercising on an empty stomach to be better for him. I wanted to cover the topic of intermittent fasting and how it can help some people lose weight and actually boost their workouts, so I wrote a Guide to Intermittent Fasting. The guide covers what fasting is, how it compares to diets, who should not do it, and also the different kinds of fasting people can undertake. Does intermittent fasting work for diabetics? While genetics play a significant role in whether or not someone will become diabetic, for a lot of people, lifestyle choices and diet are the main contributing factors, especially in cases of Type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association has stated that due to our increasingly sedentary lifestyles, we’re raising our risks of becoming diabetic even further. Way back in 1916, Dr Eliot Joslin, working at Harvard University, wrote about the benefits of using intermittent fasting techniques to aid control of diabetes. The main health benefits are as follows: Lower blood sugar: Your body will use up the glucose in your system more effectively because you are fasting for between 12 and 16 hours. Increase Continue reading >>

This Evernote Cofounder Says Silicon Valley's Favorite Fasting Diet Has Changed His Life — Here's His Routine

This Evernote Cofounder Says Silicon Valley's Favorite Fasting Diet Has Changed His Life — Here's His Routine

Phil Libin, the ex-CEO of Evernote, doesn't eat for two to eight days in a row. He subscribes to an increasingly popular diet — fasting — which has a host of benefits backed by science. Tech executives say fasting gives them a mental edge in Silicon Valley. Phil Libin, who helped create the popular productivity app Evernote in 2007 and led the company as CEO until 2015, was melancholy for a long time. His work didn't excite him. Eventually he pinpointed the source. "It was the carbs," he said. The fall of 2017 marks one year since Libin, who now runs an artificial intelligence startup studio called All Turtles, started fasting on a regular basis. The tech executive foregoes food for between two to eight days in a row every week, drinking only water, coffee, and tea. Libin has lost 85 pounds, reversed a prediabetes diagnosis, and feels "25 years younger," he told Business Insider in a recent interview at the All Turtles office in San Francisco. Intermittent fasting is an increasingly trendy diet that involves going without food for anywhere from 14 hours to several days. Strange as it sounds, the diet has a lot of scientific backing. Large studies have found it to be just as reliable for weight loss as traditional diets. Some studies in animals have suggested it has other perks as well, including reducing the risk of certain cancers, improving cognitive performance, and even prolonging life. The fad has picked up fans in Silicon Valley, including author and podcaster Tim Ferriss, Y Combinator partner Daniel Gross, internet entrepreneur Kevin Rose (who created an app that lets fasters track their progress), and nearly the entire team at "smart drug" startup HVMN. Libin subscribes to a more extreme version of intermittent fasting, known as extended fasting. Phil Libin, Continue reading >>

The Diabetics Guide To Intermittent Fasting

The Diabetics Guide To Intermittent Fasting

Is IF safe for people with diabetes? Will IF get results for people with diabetes? IF is becoming very popular. There are a wide range of different fasting methods, some of the most popular include: Eat Stop Eat 5:2 Diet (participants limit their calorie intake on two days per week) 16:8 diet 18:6 diet Generally speaking, IF works well for people who are looking to lose body fat, fast-paced individuals who struggle to get the time to eat multiple meals per day and people with diabetes wanting to improve their HBA1C In respect to diabetes management, The typical Intermittent 18 hour fast followed by a 6 hour eating window can help improve HBA1C levels. If you stop eating at 6:00 pm your quick acting insulin is pretty much out of your system by 10:00pm (bedtime). Provided your blood glucose is within target range and your background insulin is dosed correctly, your next 18 hours (until 12:00pm the next day) will sit well inside range. Solid diabetes control means a good HBA1C and less likelihood of complications. Other intermittent fasting methods like the 16 hour (fast)/8 hour (eat) window also work well. If you have a bit of dawn phenomenon you may need a unit or two of quick acting insulin to prevent high blood glucose. How much insulin you need to take is largely based on your calorie needs for your specific goal, stress, level of activity and some trial and error. In respect to fat loss, The latest consensus statement from the ISSN on body comp and diets (which we have reviewed extensively inside the Training Lab) concludes IF has no significant benefits on body composition over other methods that drive a daily calorie deficit. The basic concept of Intermittent fasting is grounded on the limited feeding window of 6 to 8 hours. This narrow eating window makes it harde Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

INDYPULSE Intermittent fasting could help tackle diabetes – here’s the science Intermittent fasting is currently all the rage. But don’t be fooled: it’s much more than just the latest fad. Recent studies of this kind of fasting – with restricted eating part of the time, but not all of the time – have produced a number of successes, but the latest involving diabetes might be the most impressive yet. The idea of intermittent fasting arose after scientists were impressed by the effects of constant calorie restriction. A number of studies in many different animals have shown that restricted eating throughout adulthood leads to dramatic improvements in lifespan and general health. The reasons for these improvements aren’t yet clear. Part of it seems to be that going without food gives cells in the body a much needed break to perform maintenance and repair. But the lack of food also forces cells to resort to alternative sources of energy. Some of these, such as ketones – molecules created in the liver from recycled fat – appear to be beneficial. The problem is that constant calorie restriction isn’t practical: it’s easy for scientists to impose upon lab animals, but hard for humans to impose upon themselves in the real world. Fortunately, we’ve learnt that constant calorie restriction isn’t really necessary. Intermittent fasting seems to have many of the same benefits. There are two main types of intermittent fasting. One type, known as “time restricted feeding”, requires eating only during a few hours of the day – say between 10am and 6pm. This approach gives the body a long break from food each night, and also reinforces beneficial circadian rhythms. The other type of intermittent fasting – made popular by the 5:2 diet – is known as “pe Continue reading >>

How Intermittent Fasting Can Increase Weight Loss

How Intermittent Fasting Can Increase Weight Loss

Intermittent fasting, without restricting overall calorie intake, has been found to reduce weight and improve metabolism. A new investigation hunts down the molecular mechanisms behind these physiological benefits. Our modern lifestyle, combined with longer waking hours, means that the enforced period of fasting while we sleep has steadily been reduced. This, along with the poor-quality Western diet and more time spent sedentary, has dramatically increased the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disease. Over recent years, fasting has been shown to impart a number of health benefits. Many clinicians hope that by modifying aspects of fasting — such as how long to fast for, what to eat between fasts, and when to fast — it may be possible to design methods of combating obesity and metabolic disorders. The rise of periodic fasting Intermittent fasting is believed to share many of its health benefits with prolonged fasting. It has, for instance, been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Other studies have demonstrated that intermittent fasting increases insulin sensitivity and protects nerve cells from certain types of damage. It may also slow aging and reduce the risk of age-related diseases. Intermittent fasting without a reduction in calorie intake can be a preventative and therapeutic approach against obesity and metabolic disorders." Study co-author Kyoung-Han Kim Because of these, and other, recent findings, the so-called 5:2 diet — which involves 5 days of normal eating followed by 2 days of fasting — has become popular. Evidence in favor of intermittently restricting calorie intake is growing, but the mechanisms through which it imparts its benefits are still unclear. Recently, a research team led by Hoon-Ki Sung — of the Department of Laborat Continue reading >>

Effects Of Intermittent Fasting On Health Markers In Those With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

Effects Of Intermittent Fasting On Health Markers In Those With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

Go to: Abstract To determine the short-term biochemical effects and clinical tolerability of intermittent fasting (IF) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We describe a three-phase observational study (baseline 2 wk, intervention 2 wk, follow-up 2 wk) designed to determine the clinical, biochemical, and tolerability of IF in community-dwelling volunteer adults with T2DM. Biochemical, anthropometric, and physical activity measurements (using the Yale Physical Activity Survey) were taken at the end of each phase. Participants reported morning, afternoon and evening self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) and fasting duration on a daily basis throughout all study stages, in addition to completing a remote food photography diary three times within each study phase. Fasting blood samples were collected on the final days of each study phase. At baseline, the ten participants had a confirmed diagnosis of T2DM and were all taking metformin, and on average were obese [mean body mass index (BMI) 36.90 kg/m2]. We report here that a short-term period of IF in a small group of individuals with T2DM led to significant group decreases in weight (-1.395 kg, P = 0.009), BMI (-0.517, P = 0.013), and at-target morning glucose (SMBG). Although not a study requirement, all participants preferentially chose eating hours starting in the midafternoon. There was a significant increase (P < 0.001) in daily hours fasted in the IF phase (+5.22 h), although few attained the 18-20 h fasting goal (mean 16.82 ± 1.18). The increased fasting duration improved at-goal (< 7.0 mmol/L) morning SMBG to 34.1%, from a baseline of 13.8%. Ordinal Logistic Regression models revealed a positive relationship between the increase in hours fasted and fasting glucose reaching target values (χ2 likelihood rat Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting (IF) is an umbrella term for forms of fasting that cycle between periods of fasting and feeding. Fasting has dated back thousands of years and been a part of religious tradition for groups including Christians, Hindus, Jews, Muslims, and Buddhists. Some of the beneficial effects of fasting have been known to kick in starting in as little as 12 hours into a fasted state, and it is suggested that the effects grow more with more extended periods of fasting. Overview of Effects of Intermittent Fasting While caloric restriction may be psychologically difficult for some individuals, there is an growing body of scientific research showing health benefits including longevity, improved metabolic state, improved insulin resistance, and cognitive improvement. Studies on intermittent fasting have been performed in both animals and humans. In experiments with yeast and rodents, lifespan is increased by caloric restriction. In rhesus monkeys, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease can be ameliorated by caloric restriction. Humans with mutations in the growth hormone receptor and nutrient sensing pathways also tend to have longer life spans, as well as huge reductions in pro-aging molecular signaling, cancer, and diabetes.1Mutations or inhibition of molecular pathways associated with nutrient sensing can mimic this enhancement of lifespan. This evidence points to a variety of effects of modulation of human biology through nutrient sensing pathways - with intermittent fasting being a powerful mechanism to regulate these pathways. Figure 1. Intermittent fasting affects multiple organ systems. In the brain, the hippocampus, striatum, hypothalamus, and brainstem are affected. IF enhances parasympathetic neural activity in the gut, heart and arteries. IF depletes Continue reading >>

5 Types Of People Most Likely To Benefit From Intermittent Fasting... And 5 Who Should Avoid It

5 Types Of People Most Likely To Benefit From Intermittent Fasting... And 5 Who Should Avoid It

We hope you enjoy the products we're recommending as much as we do! Just so you know, Prevention may get a share of sales from the links on this page. IF plans might sound wacky to some, but there’s evidence that they work. One study, published in the Journal of Translational Medicine in 2016, found that people who practiced IF for eight weeks lost more body fat than those in the control group. There may also be benefits beyond weight loss: A 2007 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded this dietary approach might help prevent chronic ailments like heart disease and type 2 diabetes. “The majority of studies have been on animals, and we need more research,” says Robin Foroutan, RDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "But if you're in overall good health, it's probably safe to try it out." Lisa Jubilee, CDN, co-founder of Living Proof Pilates in New York City, who follows time-restricted eating herself, believes that IF has multiple benefits for many people, though there are specific groups who should steer clear or work closely with a doctor. How to know which camp you fall into? When in doubt, it's always smart to consult your personal doctor or nutritionist. But here are some indicators to help you sort it out. (Transform your health with 365 days of slimming secrets, wellness tips, and motivation—get your 2018 Prevention calendar and health planner today!) Intermittent fasting might be right for you if… You’re an all-or-nothing kind of person. If you've ever tried to diet, you likely know how it feels when you inevitably fall off the wagon. While some people can get right back on, others end up way off-course. "If you're not perfect and overindulge on dessert, you might think 'OK, I screwed up; now I'm going t Continue reading >>

Introduction To Intermittent Fasting

Introduction To Intermittent Fasting

Editor’s Note: Cyrus Khambatta, PhD, lives with type 1 diabetes and coaches his clients in a non-traditional nutritional approach to diabetes management. The views expressed in this article are his own. Intermittent fasting is term coined by the research world that refers to an extended duration of minimal calorie intake. Believe it or not, humans are evolutionarily adapted to performing intermittent fasts – our ancestors performed extended fasts whenever food was unavailable, and feasted only when they could procure enough food to eat. However, in our modern world of abundance, deliberately fasting for an extended period of time is anything but “normal.” Fasting goes against every morsel of modern life, and is in direct opposition to the abundance-based food culture that we have worked so hard to create. In our world of fast food, on-demand food delivery and 24-hour convenience stores, choosing not to eat food can seem strange indeed. I spent my entire graduate career investigating the effects of intermittent fasting in rodents, in order to understand why calorie restriction and intermittent fasting are the gold standards for improving insulin sensitivity. As a result of this active body of research, tens of thousands of people across the world engage in intermittent fasting on a weekly basis, as a means of improving their body composition, losing fat mass, shedding pounds or observing a religious holiday. The research world has taken a large interest in calorie restriction and intermittent fasting, for the explicit purpose of identifying cellular mechanisms that may retard the aging process and promote excellent metabolic health. And in the process of studying intermittent fasting, researchers have uncovered a laundry list of health benefits that confuse even Continue reading >>

Connecting Intermittent Fasting To Weight Loss, Fatigue And Cancer Prevention

Connecting Intermittent Fasting To Weight Loss, Fatigue And Cancer Prevention

Intermittent Fasting: Intermittent fasting has absolutely changed my life. I feel less fatigued, more focused, happier and my workouts are better. Across the board it has been the single most impactful thing I have done in my health routine this year. I wanted to share some thoughts on what it is, how you can start and what it might mean for your general health and happiness. Get Started with Intermittent Fasting: One thing I want to point out is that getting started is EASY! Below are three simple steps that can get you rolling. You should try these for 2-3 weeks and see how you feel. If you are anything like me, you will never go back to ‘three square meals’ a day! 12 Hours – You probably sleep between 6-10 hours a night, so getting to 12 hours is easy. If you sleep 8 hours, start your fast 2 hours before bed and wait at least 2 hours after waking up before you eat anything. Add 1 Hour a Week – It can be daunting thinking about not eating for 20 hours in a day! So start with 12 hours and add 1 hour a week to your daily fast within 2 months you will be almost to 20 hours! Listen to Your Body – Everyday is different for us all. There are times I can go 27+ hours on a fast and not even think about it…. other days I NEED to eat. Be smart, listen to your body and take care of yourself… healthcare is selfcare. It is also important to note: Drink Water – you can drink water, coffee and tea. Don’t add sugar (!!) but you can add a little almond milk to your liking. Under 50 Calories – many of the professionals I talk to say your body does not recognize caloric intake under 50 k/cal. So… If you are starved but committed to that days fast, you can absolutely have a few almonds or something healthy and small… You cant eat under 50 k/cal 10x during your fas Continue reading >>

Diabetes On A 65% Fat Diet, Chia For Breakfast, And Intermittent Fasting

Diabetes On A 65% Fat Diet, Chia For Breakfast, And Intermittent Fasting

80 days, 5 lbs of weight loss, and my strongest blood glucose numbers ever? I'm always experimenting in a constant quest to learn about my own diabetes and test things I hear about. This article shares the most fascinating food experiments I've been trying lately. Some of it has been so surprising to me that I thought it might be useful to share with diaTribe readers. If you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! [Editor’s Note: As always, this article should not be interpreted as medical advice. Consult a healthcare provider before making significant changes to your routine, particularly if you are on insulin.] Three Fascinating Food Experiments 1. Over the past 80 days, I’ve seen excellent results from eating higher fat (65% of my calories) and a bit lower carb (about 90 grams per day) than I have in the past. I’ve spent 76% of the past 11.5 weeks in the tight range of 70-140 mg/dl, with a low average (118 mg/dl), low hypoglycemia, and low diabetes burden. Combined, these are the strongest numbers I’ve ever seen in myself over such a long time period. I’ve also lost 5 lbs. See CGM, weight, and cholesterol data below. 2. I now eat chia pudding most days for breakfast - little impact on blood glucose, very filling, three minutes to make (no cooking), inexpensive ($0.53/meal), highly portable, and stocked with Omega 3s and fiber. This is a breakfast game-changer, and I’ve created a recipe I really like. 3. For a week, I tried eating my first meal at 12pm and no food after 8pm (16:8 intermittent fasting). This schedule might be very effective for those struggling with breakfast highs or snacking too much at night. I loved having a clear line in the sand: “I don’t eat after 8pm. PERIOD.” Details, My Data, and Lesso Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Shows Promise As Therapy For Diabetes, Metabolic Diseases

Intermittent Fasting Shows Promise As Therapy For Diabetes, Metabolic Diseases

Intermittent fasting (IF) could not only lower body weight and convert unhealthy fats into energy-burning ones, it could be preventative for patients struggling with diabetes or metabolic disorders, a new study published in Cell Research reports. Kyoung-Han Kim, PhD, and colleagues found that, in a 16-week, isocaloric trial in groups of mice, rodents who were fed for two days and then fasted for one lost more weight and saw greater health benefits than mice that were fed the same amount consistently. What the fasting achieved, Kim and co-authors wrote in their paper, was converting stores of white adipose tissue (WAT) into browner fat, which stimulates energy-burning processes in the cells. Mice on a fasting regimen also saw more stable glucose and insulin systems, the authors noted—both of which are crucial in patients who live with diabetes mellitus or obesity. WAT is commonly associated with development of obesity and type 2 diabetes for a reason, but it’s also an important component of energy homeostasis, Kim et al. explained. Fat stores excess energy produced by the body and releases lipids in response to critical energy deficits. When WAT is “browned,” it also regulates thermogenic activity, which aids whole-body metabolism. Browned fat, which is known to improve insulin sensitivity, takes energy to create. Physiological stimuli like exposure to cold and exercise trigger the browning of WAT, which increases a body’s energy expenditure, burning off excess calories. For this reason, WAT browning has been suggested as a possible approach to combatting the world’s ever-growing obesity epidemic. “Modern lifestyles favor longer periods of daily energy intake and shorter fasting periods,” Kim and colleagues wrote. “This erratic eating pattern is associa Continue reading >>

Fresh And Fit: New Evidence Shows Intermittent Fasting Does Lead To Weight Loss

Fresh And Fit: New Evidence Shows Intermittent Fasting Does Lead To Weight Loss

I’ve talked before about how much damage we can do to our bodies in one meal loaded with carbohydrates and unhealthy fats. One single meal can potentially throw a healthy person’s body into a state where they’re mimicking the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes. Being healthy requires us to avoid these kinds of dramatic shifts. As always, it’s easier said than done. However, I thought about that research when I came across a different article this week. I’d like to discuss some new research on intermittent fasting I came across. What is intermittent fasting again? There are several variations of intermittent fasting you can try. Your personal results will vary. The eat-stop-eat method involves fasting for 24-hour periods of time one or two days a week. If you eat dinner at 7 Monday night and you’re following this method, you don’t eat again until 7 p.m. Tuesday. Another method, which Jimmy Kimmel lives by, is the 5:2 diet. It involves starving yourself for two out of seven days a week. On those two days of the week, consume less than 500 calories a day. The other five days, eat normally. My favorite is the 16:8 method. This method is one you should follow seven days a week. If you’re already someone who doesn’t eat or enjoy eating breakfast, it’s perfect for you. For 16 hours of the day, you don’t eat. For the remaining eight hours, you eat normally. It may sound difficult, but I’ve found once you make this a habit, it becomes second nature. Barring any legitimate health concerns, there should be no deviations if you want this method to work. The goal is, in part, to help stabilize our blood sugar levels over this 24-hour period. Eating will cause an immediate spike. You should follow your plan unless you’re feeling lightheaded or otherwise ill. Don’ Continue reading >>

The Complete Guide To Fasting & Reversing Type 2 Diabetes: A Special Interview With Dr. Jason Fung

The Complete Guide To Fasting & Reversing Type 2 Diabetes: A Special Interview With Dr. Jason Fung

“Everyone has a physician inside him or her; we just have to help it in its work. The natural healing force within each one of us is the greatest force in getting well. Our food should be our medicine. Our medicine should be our food. But to eat when you are sick is to feed your sickness.” – Hippocrates Fasting has not received as much attention as it should when it comes to the world of health and medicine. That’s because you can’t really make any money off of it. The ‘pharmaceutical science’ studies used in medical schools to teach doctors about human health simply don’t focus enough on fasting for doctors to be knowledgable in the subject. Doctors also learn very little about nutrition and are trained to prescribe drugs as a result. Dr. Jason Fung is trying to change all that. A Toronto based nephrologist, he completed medical school and internal medicine at the University of Toronto before finishing his nephrology fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles at the Cedars-Sinai hospital. He joined Scarborough General Hospital in 2001 where he continues to practice and change peoples lives. He is one of a growing number of scientists and doctors to create awareness about the tremendous health benefits that can be achieved from fasting. It’s one of the oldest dietary interventions in the world and has been practiced for thousands of years. If properly practiced fasting was bad or harmful in any way, as some doctors suggest, it would have been known by now, and studies would not be emerging showing the health benefits that can be achieved from fasting regularly. The Research For example, a recent study published in the journal cell shows how a fasting diet can trigger the pancreas to regenerate itself, which works to control blood sugar lev Continue reading >>

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