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Intermittent Fasting And Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

I’m sure that at least a few of you have heard or read about the latest trend in weight loss called “intermittent fasting.” The very word “fasting” is probably less than appealing, as it pretty much means you don’t eat or drink anything (except perhaps water) for a specified amount of time. Starvation is not exactly recommended among health professionals. But intermittent fasting is different. Is it something you should try? What is intermittent fasting, anyway? Intermittent fasting has been the talk of the town, so to speak, thanks to two recent books to hit the market: The Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer, and The Overnight Diet by Caroline Apovian, MD. Intermittent fasting essentially means that you skip a meal or severely restrict calories on certain days of the week with the intention of losing weight, controlling blood glucose, and/or decreasing heart disease risk. But on the other days of the week, you can pretty much eat what you want (within reason, of course). For many people, this concept sounds appealing. Limiting calories for a couple days a week doesn’t sound that bad if you can eat what you want the rest of the time. The Fast Diet, also called the The 5:2 Diet has you eat between 500 and 600 calories (women get 500 calories, men get 600 calories) for two days out of the week, spread over two meals of about 250 to 300 calories. These fast days should not be right in a row, and your food choices ideally should be more plant-based and emphasize protein. The premise is that after several hours of fasting, the body burns up its carbohydrate stores and shifts to burning fat for fuel. Many claim that intermittent fasting also helps to blunt appetite. The Overnight Diet emphasizes getting enough sleep; a lack of sleep can disrupt met Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting And Artificial Sweeteners: The Latest Diabetes Research

Intermittent Fasting And Artificial Sweeteners: The Latest Diabetes Research

QualityHealth Home > Diabetes Health Center >Intermittent Fasting and Artificial Sweeteners: The Latest Diabetes Research Intermittent Fasting and Artificial Sweeteners: The Latest Diabetes Research Reviewed by QualityHealth's Medical Advisory Board Researchers continue to discover new information about preventing and managing diabetes. Here are two recent findings and what they might mean for you. 1. Intermittent Fasting. Fastingthe process of limiting food intake for some predetermined timehas long been dismissed as an unhealthy quick fix approach to dieting. But new research suggests that intermittent, or sporadic fasting, seems to improve health, reduce the incidence of diseases such as cancer, and increase longevityat least in animals. So its no surprise that researchers are studying fasting with regard to diabetes and weight loss, since many people who have diabetes are also overweight or obese. Preliminary studies find that intermittent (1 to 3 days per week) or alternate day (every other day) fasting may help with weight loss and may help protect patients hearts. Intermediate or alternate day fasting also seems to improve how sensitive you are to insulin, the hormone needed to help metabolize [convert food into energy]; people with diabetes are less sensitive to insulins effects (insulin resistant). With both intermittent and alternate day fasts, participants reduce their food intake by 500 to 600 calories (or 25 percent of normal consumption) on fasting days. 2. Artificial Sweeteners. Artificial sweeteners are promoted as a good alternative to sugar, especially in beverages like soda. However, in people who have diabetes, there is a link between frequent consumption of artificial sweeteners and negative results, such as being overweight or obese. A new study s Continue reading >>

How To Heal Diabetes With Intermittent Fasting

How To Heal Diabetes With Intermittent Fasting

How To Heal Diabetes With Intermittent Fasting Did you know that ten percent of our population struggles with Healing Diabetes? Thats 30 million people! While we once believed the disease to be irreversible, studies now shed light on an alternative treatment option-intermittent fasting. What do we mean by intermittent fasting? It is a period of hours during which you dont eat anything. There are many ways to do it, and they all have effectiveness. I used to be against fasting for the most part because I thought it was too hard when people have very stressful lives. Jimmy Kimmel late night show host, has talked about following a fasting schedule of not eating two days a week, for the last two years. Others fast for 12 hours a day, from dinner time till they get up in the morning. How Intermittent Fasting Works AGAINST Diabetes Animal studies carried out on mice showed remarkable results when the mice were put on a fasting schedule. Numerous stories have been reported of diabetics attributing the reversal of their disease to this seemingly extreme way of dieting. One such testimonial comes from one of my own patients! She saw Jimmy Kimmel talk about his fasting schedule and decided to try it herself. She has struggled with her sugars for years! After she began intermittent fasting, her blood glucose readings became ideal! For many years, science has dictated that the best way to manage blood sugar is to eat 6 small meals a day. And its often difficult to determine the best diet to follow for healing diabetes. The most recent science shows that giving your pancreas a rest periodically actually helps it heal and begin to respond to insulin again. Interestingly intermittent fasting has been compared to weight loss surgery in its effectiveness at healing diabetes. How can th Continue reading >>

Exciting Research For Diabetes Finds Even More Benefits To Intermittent Fasting.

Exciting Research For Diabetes Finds Even More Benefits To Intermittent Fasting.

Exciting Research for diabetes finds even more benefits to intermittent fasting. by Dr Elen ApThomas | posted in: Detoxing , Gut Health | 0 The evidence supporting intermittent fasting continues to grow. Not only has it proven to be a very effective method for weight loss and improving our life span and general health but is now also proving to be a powerful tool in the management and prevention of diabetes. There are many human and animal trials showing dramatic improvements gained from intermittent fasting to assist in the progression and management of diabetes. Researchers in the University of Southern California began by testing whether periodic fasting could cure diabetes in mice. They used mutant mice that lack the fat hormone leptin to regulate their food intake. These mice constantly overeat and become obese and diabetic in early adulthood. The researchers found that after just a few months of periodic fasting (alternating seven unrestricted eating days with four restricted days) the diabetes was cured. What was incredible was the reason why. The mice lost weight during the fasting period which helped but the reason the diabetes was cured was that the fasting phase made the pancreas start producing insulin again. The days of restricted eating gave the pancreas a break that allowed it to remove and recycle many of its cells. This meant that when the mice started eating again new pancreatic cells were available to produce insulin again. A recent human study at Tel Aviv University, in Israel has measured the effect of short term fasting on markers of blood sugar control in a small number of people with type 2 diabetes. The research was published in Diabetes Care journal. In this experiment for two days patients skipped breakfast and couldnt eat until 1:30 pm. Rese Continue reading >>

About The Author

About The Author

About Me Hi! I'm Jenny Ruhl, the author of this web site. I'm 69 years old. I was first diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes in 1998. Several years ago I discovered that I may actually have a form of MODY which is a genetic form of diabetes different from both Type 1 and Type 2. After my diagnosis in 1998 I ate a very low carb diet for 7 years to control my blood sugar. Then I used fast-acting insulin at meals with a higher carb intake for another 4 years. I then switched to Prandin (repaglinide) for a year as this turns out to be the best drug for the form of MODY I appear to have. Then, for reasons no one can explain, my blood sugar control improved very suddenly about 5 years ago. So I currently can control with diet alone, though I will occasionally take a very low dose of Prandin if I'm going to eat a high carb meal. My A1c, as of August 2017 was 5.7%. I currently weigh 147 lbs. After losing 30 pounds with a ketogenic low carb diet in 2004 I kept my weight in the middle 140s for over a decade by watching carbs and calories. Unfortunately, a few years ago I made the mistake of eating a 5:2 fasting diet for two years. The diet started off impressively, with rapid weight loss, but ended up being the first diet I have ever followed that left me fatter than I was when I started out, unlike the low carb diet with counted calories. My experience with 5:2 intermittent fasting is described in more detail HERE. For now, my current BMI is just above the upper limit for the normal range for my height. However, at my age, it turns out that being slightly overweight correlates to better long-term survival than does normal weight, so I do not intend to do any more weight loss dieting. However, I always make every effort to keep my post-meal blood sugars within the target range that wil Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting The Best Tool To Fight Obesity And Diabetes!

Intermittent Fasting The Best Tool To Fight Obesity And Diabetes!

Intermittent Fasting The Best Tool To Fight Obesity And Diabetes! Intermittent Fasting The Best Tool To Fight Obesity And Diabetes! fellowship in diabetes, Professional Training in Mind Body Medicine, MS, MBBS Dietitian/Nutritionist, Ahmedabad 24 years experience In the earlier days, the food was not as readily available as it is today. For that reason, our ancestors probably did not eat every day. This has made the idea of intermittent fasting popular as a way of losing excess weight and reducing the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes . Intermittent fasting involves eating a regular diet for five days of a week and lowering your calorific intake to 25% of your usual intake for the remaining two days. Lets take a closer look at some of the benefits of this diet. Weight loss :By fasting intermittently, you are not starving your body but increasing your metabolism rates. This is because when your calorific intake reduces, so does the bodys insulin levels. At the same time, the growth hormone levels may increase. Simultaneously, norepinephrine is sent to the fat cells by the nervous system to break down fat cells into fatty acids that can be used to release energy. As a result of these changes, the rate at which fat burns increases considerably. Thus, while no muscle weight is lost, there could be significant weight loss due to the loss of fat. Reduced triglyceride and cholesterol levels:When you are forced to lower your calorific intake without compromising on nutrition for your body, your diet will include more fresh fruits and vegetables instead of refined carbs and processed foods. These foods have a low-fat value and bad cholesterol value. However, they do contain good cholesterol that helps remove bad cholesterol from the body and reduce triglyceride levels. Continue reading >>

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

When the now 46-year-old Mary Roberts from Lockhart, Texas, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008, her doctor immediately put her on Metformin (glucophage), a drug to help stabilize blood sugar. “When I got the diagnosis, I guess I wasn’t surprised,” says Roberts, explaining that not only was she overweight but her mom had been on insulin for type 2 diabetes. Not wanting to be on medication herself for her entire life, Roberts set out on a path to control the diabetes through diet, but a few years of nutrition classes proved unsuccessful in lowering her blood sugar level. It was after her doctor suggested insulin on top of the high dose of Metformin that Roberts switched gears. “I really wanted to find a way to get healthy,” she says. She found the solution in changing her approach to eating — just not the way she expected. Intermittent fasting (IF) combined with the popular ketogenic diet, which emphasizes dramatically reducing carbohydrate intake, helped her lose weight and lower her A1C. “I feel amazing,” Roberts says. What Is Intermittent Fasting and How Is It Done? Although IF has become more popular in recent years, the diet plan isn’t new. In fact, many religions (including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) have followers who practice fasting of some variety throughout the year. Fasting is often required for blood tests, medical procedures, or surgery. The reason IF has gained so much attention recently is likely due to the release of new diet books plugging the plans and celebrity endorsements. “I think that it has gained popularity because anytime a person drastically cuts calories from their diet, they’re going to lose weight. And we’re so results driven that by seeing that happen we think, This is a great solution,” says Despina Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent Fasting

The tradition of eating three meals a day started with the European settlers who wanted to be more civilized than Native American Indians, who only ate when they were hungry. Meals were originally consumed only during daylight hours, but our expanding shift work and schedules have resulted in around the clock eating. As a result of our frequent eating habits and our Standard American Diet (SAD), the United States is one of the fattest countries in the world. We have eaten three daily meals for hundreds of years. This is evidenced by our expanding waistlines, over protruding bellies, large buttocks, and even larger thighs. Cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are all diseases of overeating. The human body can store carbohydrates (about 24-36 hours of useable energy) and fats. When your liver has filled its storage capacity for carbohydrates, it then begins to convert excess carbohydrates into fat. Most Americans who eat 3 meals a day and wash it down with a sugary drink are currently in a vicious cycle of storing fat and becoming insulin resistant. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas which allows our cells to use glucose (sugar) for energy, People with insulin resistance have cells that do not use insulin effectively. This means the cells have trouble absorbing glucose, due to increased fat in the cells which cause a buildup of sugar in the blood. A normal range for a healthy person’s glucose level is anywhere between 70 mg/dL and 99 mg/dL in the morning, after fasting for 8 hours through the night, and less than 140 mg/dL 2 hours after eating. The National Institutes of Health states that a person has pre-diabetes if they have a fasting blood glucose level between 100-125 mg/dL or a two-hour blood glucose level between 140- Continue reading >>

'on The 5:2 I Lost 9 Kilos And Reversed My Diabetes | Daily Mail Online

'on The 5:2 I Lost 9 Kilos And Reversed My Diabetes | Daily Mail Online

Dr Michael Mosley, the man who launched the 5:2 diet revolution, has refined and revised his original plan followed by Hollywood stars and politicians as well as millions of Britons with the help of the latest scientific research This years Oscars ceremony will be remembered chiefly because the producers of La La Land were mistakenly told they had won Best Picture and then had to hand the award back. I, however, was far more interested in the appearance of the host, comedian Jimmy Kimmel, than anything else that was going on. Jimmy is a big fan of the 5:2 diet, which he credits with helping him lose 30lb and keep it off. It has helped me stay at 182lb, he said in a recent interview, and made me appreciate the food that I eat. (I am happy to report that as well as looking slim and healthy, Jimmy was also very funny.) The 5:2 diet has changed my life, but it came about largely by chance. Five years ago I discovered that, like my father, I had become a type 2 diabetic. My father died at the relatively early age of 74 from complications of diabetes and I was desperate not to follow in his footsteps. So rather than start on medication I looked for alternative ways to improve my blood-sugar levels and came across something called intermittent fasting. This led to my making a documentary, Eat, Fast and Live Longer, and writing a book, The Fast Diet, with journalist Mimi Spencer, which became an international bestseller. Intermittent fasting is not fasting in the sense that you are going entirely without food. You are simply cutting back on your calories a few days a week. There are many different approaches, from alternate day fasting to the 16:8 diet, but the 5:2 (reducing your calories to around 600 a day, twice a week) is the one that many people find easiest to do. On the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Weight Loss For Type 2

Diabetes And Weight Loss For Type 2

Obesity and diabetes are intimately linked. In particular, abdominal obesity can be a major culprit in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Research shows that if you are overweight and have been diagnosed with Diabetes Type 2, losing weight will significantly lower your blood sugar levels and also improve your overall health. So, yes. Diabetes and weight loss makes immense sense. But, could there be a “right” and a “wrong” way to achieve your weight loss goals? Diabetes And Weight Loss Dilemma The most important thing to understand is this – any weight loss is good. According to Cathy Nonas, MS, RD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association and a professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, “No matter how heavy you are, you will significantly lower your blood sugar if you lose some weight.” The Finnish Prevention Study and a study by Diabetes Prevention Program (see References at the end of the article for details) both prove that lifestyle changes that instigate a weight reduction of 5% (or more) decrease the overall risk of diabetes by as much as 58% in high-risk patients. For those living with diabetes, studies have shown that a loss of 5–10% of body weight can improve fitness levels, reduce HbA1c levels, improve cardiovascular health, and decrease use of diabetes, hypertension, and lipid-lowering medications. That’s not all; diabetics who successfully lose weight also lower their risk of depression and sleep apnea. People diagnosed with diabetes get a bundle of advice when it comes to weight loss. From magazines to TV shows to friends and family and even health professionals, everyone will point you towards the latest break-through diet and exercise regime that will help you lose weight quickly and maybe ev Continue reading >>

16 Amazing Health Benefits Of Intermittent Fasting

16 Amazing Health Benefits Of Intermittent Fasting

16 Amazing Health Benefits Of Intermittent Fasting Intermittent fasting reduces inflammation in the body. It fights cardiovascular, metabolic, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases as well as diabetes. It also prevents infections, age-related brain disorders, and cancer. Fasting intermittently boosts gut, skin, and brain health. Not to mention, it improves sleep, boosts mood, and aids weight loss. As little as skipping a single meal on alternate days could help. While most peopleplanto take up intermittent fasting for weight loss, its not just for weight watchers.It offers a multitude of health benefits that gives most of us reasonsto give it a go! Unlike a constant low-calorie diet or an extreme diet that requires you to cut out certain food groups like carbohydrates altogether, intermittent fasting intersperses normal eating with a meal skipped every now and again. It could also mean a day or two of fasting in between regular days. And fasting does not have to be an uphill task. In fact, when you go to sleep every night, you are in effect allowing your body to fast for the 8 hours that you sleep and until you have breakfast. Recent research has found that intermittent fasting offers a range of health benefits. So what are these benefits? Increased fat burning is the most obvious benefit of intermittent fasting. When you go on a fast, your bodys glucose and insulin levels drop significantly. In the absence of glucose, the body turns to fat burning. One small study of non-obese men and women found that fat oxidation rates increased after alternate-day fasting.1 Human growth hormone levels also rise significantly after fasting.2 This hormone is said to help with fat burningas well as muscle gain. Research has shown that it can increase lean body mass and bring down Continue reading >>

Weight Loss With Intermittent Fasting

Weight Loss With Intermittent Fasting

Obesity markedly increases risk for diabetes, heart attacks, strokes and many cancers, all of which can lead to premature death. Once a person becomes obese, it is very difficult to return to and maintain a normal weight. All of the widely-promoted diets (low-fat, low-carbohydrate, calorie-counting and so forth) have failed to stop the incredible increase of obesity in North America over the last 50 years. Eating regular meals five days a week and markedly reducing calories for the other two days may be the best way to lose weight and keep it off. This approach to weight loss is called "intermittent fasting." We have some good data on how effective this diet regimen is for animals, but we are just starting to see the results of research on humans. Most of the studies on humans do not ask participants to avoid all food on their "fast" days. Participants usually eat normally for five days and restrict food to about 500 calories a day for two days a week. Results of one of the best studies we have of intermittent fasting in humans showed that fasting every other day for 12 weeks caused 32 people to lose an average of 12 pounds more than those who followed a daily program of calorie restriction (Nutrition Journal, 11/27/2013). The intermittent-fasting group also markedly lowered several heart attack risk factors: • They lost an average of eight pounds of fat. • Their triglycerides dropped 20 mg/dL. (High triglycerides signify increased risk for diabetes). • Their bad LDL particle size increased. (The larger the particle size, the less likely you are to become diabetic). • CRP decreased 13 percent. (CRP measures inflammation that causes heart attacks. The lower your CRP, the less likely you are to develop a heart attack). • Blood adiponectin increased six percent. Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Coffee While Doing Intermittent Fasting?

Can You Drink Coffee While Doing Intermittent Fasting?

Can You Drink Coffee While Doing Intermittent Fasting? For more health tips | I like | Comment | Share : How to avoid unwanted pregnancies naturally: Period Hacks || How to stop your periods early: Practical tips on hand care at home that work: Natural facial pack for skin that instantly shines: Get rid of stretch marks quickly and permanently: Drink this juice every day to cure #Thyroid in 3 days: How does garlic improve sexual stamina? Incredible benefits of olive oil for health: Home remedies for the relief of joint pain and arthritis: Both hot and cold tea are acceptable. You can also drink coffee during intermittent fasting, but it must be black, without sugar, milk or cream, containing calories. Use artificial sweeteners to flavor it if you wish. In this article, we will discuss the benefits of drinking coffee during your fasting hours. Intermittent fasting 101 loses fat, builds muscle and feels great. Only one quick for you today. 21 Mar 2017 My initial concern was that if you had this coffee along with the typical American diet, you could quickly end up with another 400 700 calories at the end, intermittent bulletproof fasting is an alternative approach that includes the mixed fatty coffee during the fast period, which does not indicate a break on December 21, 2012, discover how simple the 8-hour diet can be! Can I drink milk, juice, soft drinks, sweetened coffee drinks or bottled frozen teas during the fasting period? Hell no. You can also drink coffee during intermittent fasting, but it must be black without sugar, milk or cream, which contain calories. You know the signs, the feelings, the energy and what your body is expelling. In fact, no diet has 30 APR 2015 so technically, yes, you can have coconut oil during your fast and it will not raise insulin level Continue reading >>

Fresh And Fit: New Evidence Shows Intermittent Fasting Does Lead To Weight Loss

Fresh And Fit: New Evidence Shows Intermittent Fasting Does Lead To Weight Loss

I’ve talked before about how much damage we can do to our bodies in one meal loaded with carbohydrates and unhealthy fats. One single meal can potentially throw a healthy person’s body into a state where they’re mimicking the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes. Being healthy requires us to avoid these kinds of dramatic shifts. As always, it’s easier said than done. However, I thought about that research when I came across a different article this week. I’d like to discuss some new research on intermittent fasting I came across. What is intermittent fasting again? There are several variations of intermittent fasting you can try. Your personal results will vary. The eat-stop-eat method involves fasting for 24-hour periods of time one or two days a week. If you eat dinner at 7 Monday night and you’re following this method, you don’t eat again until 7 p.m. Tuesday. Another method, which Jimmy Kimmel lives by, is the 5:2 diet. It involves starving yourself for two out of seven days a week. On those two days of the week, consume less than 500 calories a day. The other five days, eat normally. My favorite is the 16:8 method. This method is one you should follow seven days a week. If you’re already someone who doesn’t eat or enjoy eating breakfast, it’s perfect for you. For 16 hours of the day, you don’t eat. For the remaining eight hours, you eat normally. It may sound difficult, but I’ve found once you make this a habit, it becomes second nature. Barring any legitimate health concerns, there should be no deviations if you want this method to work. The goal is, in part, to help stabilize our blood sugar levels over this 24-hour period. Eating will cause an immediate spike. You should follow your plan unless you’re feeling lightheaded or otherwise ill. Don’ Continue reading >>

Strategies For Management Of Intermittent Fasting In Patients With Diabetes

Strategies For Management Of Intermittent Fasting In Patients With Diabetes

Islam is the second most common religion in the world, and there are 1.6 billion Muslims, many in areas where diabetes is prevalent. Each year observant Muslims fast during the daylight hours for the holy month of Ramadan. It is estimated that 50 million diabetic people fast between dawn and sundown during Ramadan, and Muslims are not the only group of patients who fast for religious or other reasons. It is important for healthcare providers to guide patients with diabetes in avoiding problems related to prolonged fasting. In this issue of the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, Drs. A.V. and Zagar address management of diabetes specifically relating to Ramadan fasting, with considerations that also apply to other diabetic patients who fast for religious or for medical reasons. Fortunately, we now have antihyperglycemic agents that are unlikely to cause hypoglycemia if used alone or in combination, as long as the regimen does not include insulin or a sulfonylurea. These include: Metformin and thiazolidinediones (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), which improve insulin sensitivity Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, dulaglutide, and albaglutide), which facilitate insulin release in a glucose-dependent fashion Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (sitagliptin, saxagliptin, alogliptin, and linagliptin), which augment endogenous incretin hormones, primarily GLP-1, and also facilitate insulin production in a glucose-dependent fashion Alpha glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose and miglitol), which slow carbohydrate absorption. Introduced in recent years, the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin lower blood glucose by reducing the renal threshold for reabsorption of glucose, coupled with reabs Continue reading >>

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