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Interesting Facts About Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 diabetes can also be called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with type 1 must take insulin in order to live. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes because it was diagnosed mainly in children. However, that name is no longer accurate because children are increasingly developing another type of diabetes—type 2 diabetes. Also, it is possible for adults to be diagnosed as type 1, so the name “juvenile diabetes” isn’t accurate. Researchers aren’t exactly sure what causes type 1 diabetes, although they have some clues, including genetics and environmental triggers. Researchers have noticed that more cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in northern climates, leading them to suggest that environmental triggers play a role in the development of type 1. Specifically, viral infections (which happen more often in colder northern climates where people are in close proximity) may trigger type 1. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2: about 90% of people with diabetes have type 2. With tight blood glucose control, you can avoid many of the short- and long-term complications associated with type 1 diabetes, including foot problems and nerve pain. Exercise is an important part of keeping diabetes under control. Many famous people have type 1 diabetes, including: Jay Cutler (quarterback for the Chicago Bears), Billie Jean King, Ron Santo (Chicago Cubs player), Halle Berry, Mary Tyler Moore, and Nick Jonas. Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the US population have diabetes. T Continue reading >>

Ten Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

Ten Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

Did you know these 10 facts about diabetes? About one third of all people with diabetes do not know they have the disease. Type 2 diabetes often does not have any symptoms. Only about five percent of all people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. If you are at risk, type 2 diabetes can be prevented with moderate weight loss (10–15 pounds) and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity (such as brisk walking) each day. A meal plan for a person with diabetes isn’t very different than that which is recommended for people without diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults. People with diabetes are twice as likely to develop heart disease than someone without diabetes. Good control of diabetes significantly reduces the risk of developing complications and prevents complications from getting worse. Bariatric surgery can reduce the symptoms of diabetes in obese people. Diabetes costs $174 billion annually, including $116 billion in direct medical expenses. Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Facts About Diabetes

5 Surprising Facts About Diabetes

"Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children after asthma, but the percentage of kids who have it is still relatively low," says Parents advisor Lori Laffel, MD, chief of the pediatric, adolescent, and young-adult section at Harvard's Joslin Diabetes Center. Here are five important truths about this serious illness. Fact: Most Children Who Get Diabetes Aren't Fat Type 2 diabetes, which is usually triggered by obesity, has gotten a lot of press because it used to strike only adults and is now being diagnosed in kids as young as 6, says Dr. Laffel. Alarming as that is, a greater number of kids get type 1, an autoimmune disease that's been rising 4 percent a year since the 1970s -- especially in young kids. Only 3,700 children are diagnosed with type 2 every year compared with 15,000 who develop type 1, according to a large study that provides the first detailed look at diabetes in U.S. kids. In many ways, the two forms of diabetes are very different. In type 1, which has no known cause, the immune system mistakenly destroys healthy cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, the hormone that helps the body get energy from food. To make up for the shortfall, children typically need injections of insulin several times a day. In type 2, the pancreas usually makes plenty of insulin (at least at first), but cells throughout the body have trouble using it -- a condition known as insulin resistance. But no matter what the type, diabetes causes high blood-sugar levels when glucose from food -- the body's equivalent of gasoline for a car -- builds up because it can't get into cells without insulin. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage organs and tissues throughout the body. Fact: White Children Are at the Highest Risk Many people have heard that diabetes is Continue reading >>

Interesting Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

Interesting Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

Facts about Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is also known as diabetes mellitus type 1, juvenile diabetes and insulin-dependent diabetes. The first case of type 1 diabetes was diagnosed long back in 1970s. Type 1 diabetes is characterised by deficient insulin production. This is because this condition causes pancreatic cells (resources of insulin) to start destroying body immunity. For survival, a person with type 1 diabetes requires daily administration of insulin. Exercise is also an important way of keeping control over diabetes. Diabetics are more vulnerable to other medical conditions. For instance, diabetes is the leading cause of amputation, kidney failure and blindness. High blood sugar level in type 1 diabetics can damage their blood vessels, thus affecting eyes, kidney and even heart. Until recently, juvenile diabetes (type 1 diabetes) was considered to be a disease affecting only kids. But of late even adults have been found likely to develop this condition. Diabetic children are largely diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Another interesting fact about diabetes type 1 is that till now its cause is not identified. However, factors such as autoimmunity and genetics are considered to be responsible for the disease. According to some studies, maximum number of type 1 diagnoses is from the colder northern climates. Researchers consider viral infections due to cold climate as a triggering factor for the disease. Eighty percent of diabetes deaths occur in low and middle income countries. However, type 1 is less common than type 2. About 90% of diabetes cases are of type 2 diabetes. Every year there are millions of death from diabetes. Even though, diabetes is not the direct cause of death, it contributes to the cause. For instance, kidney failure and heart diseases are Continue reading >>

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

The word “diabetes” is Greek for “siphon,” which refers to the copious urine of uncontrolled diabetes. “Mellitus” is Latin for “honey” or “sweet,” a name added when physicians discovered that the urine from people with diabetes is sweet with glucose.[8] Scientists predict that there may be 30 million new cases of diabetes in China alone by 2025.[1] The earliest recorded mention of a disease that can be recognized as diabetes is found in the Ebers papyrus (1500 B.C.), which includes directions for several mixtures that could “remove the urine, which runs too often.”[1] The name “diabetes” is attributed to the famed Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia who practiced in the first century A.D. He believed that diabetes was caused by snakebite.[1] William Cullen (1710-1790), a professor of chemistry and medicine in Scotland, is responsible for adding the term “mellitus” (“sweet” or “honey-like”) to the word diabetes.[1] Insulin was coined from the Latin insula (“island”) because the hormone is secreted by the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas.[9] In 1889, Oskar Minkowski (1858-191931) discovered the link between diabetes and the pancreas (pan - “all” + kreas - “flesh) when a dog from which he removed the pancreas developed diabetes.[1] Before the discovery of insulin, surgeons rarely operated on diabetic patients with gangrene because the patients typically would not heal and would inevitably die. On occasion, an area of gangrene would “auto-amputate,” meaning it would dry up and fall off.[1] Before the discovery of insulin in 1921, physicians would often put their patients on starvation or semi-starvation diets, recommending they eat only foods such as oatmeal.[1] In 1996, a 16-year-old girl with diabetes died at he Continue reading >>

Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes

Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes

(Photo Credit: Josie Nicole) Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes is one of the most misunderstood diseases, and it accounts for 5-10% of all diabetes cases. Not many people understand the complexity or severity unless personally affected by it. Much of the stigma surrounding diabetes is brought on by myths and misconceptions. But as the prevalence is increasing worldwide, it’s important to debunk many of these myths and share the facts about Type 1 Diabetes. MYTH: Type 1 Diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar – FACT: Type 1 Diabetes occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. There is no known cause but it’s believed that genes and environmental factors play a role. MYTH: People with Type 1 Diabetes can be cured with diet and exercise – FACT: There is no cure for Type 1 Diabetes (YET). Yes, diet and exercise is beneficial for anyone including those managing diabetes, but it can not treat nor reverse it. MYTH: Sugar is off limits with Type 1 Diabetes – FACT: People with Type 1 Diabetes are not limited to what they can eat. Insulin is administered to cover the carbs or sugar they eat. Too much sugar is bad for everyone, but moderation is key. Sugar is also needed and life-saving for diabetics with low blood sugar. MYTH: If it’s sugar-free then it’s okay for Type 1 Diabetics to go ahead and consume – FACT: Actually, many sugar-free foods are loaded with carbohydrates. In many cases where they have more carbohydrates than a product just made with pure sugar. It’s always important to check nutrition labels because product packaging can be deceiving. MYTH: You won’t get Type 1 Diabetes if you live a healthy and active lifestyle – FACT: Type 1 Diabetes is not caused by ones’ lifesty Continue reading >>

10 Facts You May Not Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Facts You May Not Know About Type 1 Diabetes

1. Type 1 diabetes develops when a patient’s immune system mysteriously destroys pancreatic cells that make the hormone insulin, which regulates blood sugar and helps cells use the sugar glucose for energy. 2. Type 1 Diabetes is the second most common chronic illness in children, behind asthma. 3. Cases of Type 1 diabetes are increasing worldwide, particularly in young children. 4. Warning signs can include extreme thirst, frequent urination, a fruity breath odor and blurred vision. Generalized symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, stomachache, appetite changes and weight loss can also be indicators. 5. Kids are often misdiagnosed with viruses, acid reflux, strep throat, sinus or urinary tract infections. 6. Left untreated, kids are at risk for a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA develops when glucose-starved cells trigger a process that makes blood more acidic. 7. Type 1 Diabetes almost always appears before age 40. Half of patients are diagnosed by 18. 8. By 2050 in the United States, cases in children and teenagers are predicted to more than triple, with the average age of diagnosis apparently increasing. 9. In Philadelphia, Pa, the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children younger than 5 has more than double since 1985. 10. Type 1 Diabetes’ mortality rate is highest in babies, toddlers, and preschoolers, due to delayed diagnoses and greater vulnerability to dehydration. Continue reading >>

Ten Surprising Facts About Diabetes

Ten Surprising Facts About Diabetes

Today is World Diabetes Day – blue monuments around the world put this often undetected disease into the spotlight.The World Health Organization estimates that more than 347 million people suffer from diabetes – more than one eighth of the world population. Only twenty years ago, WHO estimates said 135 million. Both diabetes type 1 and type 2 are on the rise, although numbers of the latter rise more quickly, hand in hand with the global obesity crisis. In the US, diabetes is the 6th leading cause of death, and its mortality rate equals that of the global HIV/Aids epidemic. More than twenty years ago, the International Diabetes Federation chose November 14th for its World Diabetes Day – Frederick Banting’s birthday, the first doctor who succeeded in treating a human patient with animal insulin in 1922. One year later, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. At the age of 32, he was the youngest Nobel laureate ever in this category. Ten Surprising Facts About Diabetes 1.Type 1 and 2 have completely different underlying molecular mechanisms: in type 1, an autoimmune reaction destroys the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Consequently patients are dependent on insulin shots or pumps for life. The origin of this disease is unknown, but there is definitely a genetic component. On the other hand, type 2 is characterised by a growing insulin resistance: the body produces insulin, but its various cells become immune to it. At some point, the pancreas stops producing insulin. 2. More than 90 percent of all diabetes patients have type 2. They don’t necessarily have the typical symptoms like extreme thirst or frequent urination. According to estimates, one third of all afflicted people don’t even know they have diabetes. They only learn abo Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Myths And Facts

Type 1 Diabetes: Myths And Facts

Diabetes can be a confusing condition, even for the children, teenagers and families who live with it every day. Here, we separate some of the myths from the truths about type 1 diabetes and those who have it. Myth: Diabetes comes from eating too much sugar. Fact: The exact causes of diabetes — both type 1 and type 2 — aren’t known. What is clear is that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, which means it results when the body’s immune system destroys its own tissues. In this case, the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells located in the pancreas. What prompts the immune system to target these cells is unknown, but age, genetics, environment, and other factors all play a part. Myth: Diabetes can be reversed with diet and exercise. Fact: While diet and exercise play an important role in how some people manage their type 1 diabetes, there is currently no cure for the condition. People with type 1 diabetes must rely on the infusion of insulin (via injection or an insulin pump) for life. Myth: Kids can grow out of type 1 diabetes. Fact: Diabetes is a lifelong condition, and people of any age can be diagnosed with it — both type 1 and type 2. Myth: People with diabetes can’t have sugar. Fact: With the right amount of planning, medication, and attention to the amount of carbohydrates they eat, people with diabetes can enjoy all the same foods that people without diabetes can. Some people with diabetes may choose not to eat sugary or carbohydrate-rich foods for a variety of reasons. Others might plan ahead to take extra insulin for a piece of cake or a doughnut. What’s more, people with diabetes rely on fast-acting forms of sugar (orange juice, candy, or glucose tabs) to help balance their blood glucose levels and treat hypoglycemia (low blood s Continue reading >>

Facts And Tips About Type 1 Diabetes

Facts And Tips About Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that’s caused by your pancreas not producing enough insulin—a necessary hormone for your body to function properly. This slideshow shows you fast facts and quick tips about type 1 diabetes—some you may be familiar with and some that just might surprise you. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. T1D develops when the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are mistakenly destroyed by the body’s immune system. The cause of this attack is still being researched, however scientists believe the cause may have genetic and environmental components. There is nothing anyone can do to prevent T1D. Presently, there is no known cure. Who T1D affects Type 1 diabetes (sometimes known as juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults, though people can be diagnosed at any age. With a typically quick onset, T1D must be managed with the use of insulin—either via injection or insulin pump. Soon, people who are insulin dependent may also be able to use artificial pancreas systems to automatically administer their insulin. How T1D is managed Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 disease that requires constant management. People with T1D continuously and carefully balance insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities. They also measure blood-sugar levels through finger pricks, ideally at least six times a day, or by wearing a continuous glucose monitor. Even with a strict regimen, people with T1D may still experience dangerously high or low blood-glucose levels that can, in extreme cases, be life threatening. Every person with T1D becomes actively involved in managing his or her disease. Insulin is not a cure While insulin therapy keeps people with T1D alive and can help keep blood-glucose levels within recommended range, it is not a cure, nor does it prevent the possibility of T1D’s serious effects. The outlook for treatments and a cure Although T1D is a serious and challenging disease, long-term management options cont Continue reading >>

The Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

The Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

WHAT IS TYPE 1 DIABETES? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s immune system damages the pancreas so that it can’t make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps blood sugar (glucose) get into the cells of the body to be used as fuel. When glucose can’t enter the cells, it builds up in the blood, causing high blood sugar. High blood sugar can cause problems with blood vessels, nerves, eyes, kidneys, the heart and other areas of the body. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT Type 1 diabetes often appears suddenly. In children, type 1 diabetes symptoms may be similar to the flu. Symptoms can include unusual thirst, frequent urination, extreme hunger yet with weight loss, loss of appetite, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting. Diagnosis is usually done with a blood test. Children with type 1 diabetes must have multiple daily injections of insulin to keep the blood glucose level within normal ranges. Insulin is given either by injection or insulin pump. Treatment also includes eating the right foods at the right time to manage blood sugar, and regular blood testing to check glucose levels. “Type 1 diabetes is a long-term, chronic condition, with potential, though rare, fatal consequences if not managed regularly,” CHOC Children’s endocrinologist Dr. Mark Daniels says. “An endocrinologist can help a child and his or her family come to terms with the disease and find ways to fit it into their lives.” TYPE 1 VS. TYPE 2 Only 5 percent of all people with diabetes have type 1. The remainder have another kind called type 2 diabetes, which is much more common in adults. While type 1 diabetes occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin, type 2 diabetes occurs when the body isn’t able to use insulin properly, even when it is present. Type 1 di Continue reading >>

23 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

23 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

Trivia can be fun and interesting, especially when you are learning about something that is close to home. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does, you might want to learn some interesting facts about this disease. Seeing how greatly treatment has evolved can be empowering. In addition, learning more about this disease can help to increase your awareness and motivate you to take control. As the saying goes, knowledge is power. 23 Interesting Facts About Diabetes The earliest known written record that likely referred to diabetes was in 1500 B.C in the Egyptian Ebers papyrus. It referred to the symptoms of frequent urination. Diabetes symptoms such as thirst, weight loss, and excess urination were recognized for more than 1200 years before the disease was named. The Greek physician Aretaeus (30-90CE) was credited with coming up with the name "diabetes." He recorded a disease with symptoms such as constant thirst (polydipsia), excessive urination (polyuria) and weight loss. He named the condition "diabetes," meaning "a flowing through." Dr. Thomas Willis (1621-1675) called diabetes the "pissing evil" and described the urine of people with type 2 diabetes as "wonderfully sweet, as if it was imbued with honey or sugar." He was also the first to describe pain and stinging from nerve damage due to diabetes. In ancient times, doctors would test for diabetes by tasting urine to see if it was sweet. People who tasted urine to check for diabetes were called "water tasters." Other diagnostic measures included checking to see if urine attracted ants or flies. In the late 1850's, a French physician named Priorry advised his patients with diabetes to eat large quantities of sugar. Obviously, that method of treatment did not last, as sugar increases blood sugars. Back in the Continue reading >>

25 Facts To Know On Exercise On Type 1 Diabetes

25 Facts To Know On Exercise On Type 1 Diabetes

This past month, researchers from more than a dozen leading diabetes and exercise research teams published guidelines on how to exercise with Type 1 diabetes. These guidelines, published in the Lancet, represent the current international consensus of the best methods for maintaining blood sugar control with exercise. From the report, we’ve pulled out 25 important findings: Why You Really Should Exercise 1. Some 60 percent of people with Type 1 diabetes are overweight or obese 2. Some 40 percent of people with Type 1 have hypertension, and 60 percent have dyslipidemia, a condition which increases the chance of clogged arteries, heart attacks, and strokes. Read “JDRF Rolls Out its PEAK Program on Exercise and Type 1.” sponsor 3. Children and young people with Type 1 all see improved cardiorespiratory fitness and blood lipid levels with regular physical activity. 4. Adults with Type 1 diabetes who are physically active had lower rates of retinopathy Read “5 Tips for Exercise and Type 1.” 5. Regular exercise decreases total daily insulin needs. How Much Exercise Should You Do 6. Adults with diabetes should aim for a total of 150 minutes of accumulated physical activity each week. 7. Resistance exercise is recommended two to three times a week. What Happens to Your Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise 8. During aerobic exercise, insulin secretion decreases and glucagon secretion increases. 9. During anaerobic activities and high-intensity interval training, circulating insulin levels do not decrease as much as they do in aerobic activities. 10. Trained athletes with Type 1 diabetes experience greater drops in blood sugar levels during aerobic exercise than do those who aren’t that physically fit. 11. Resistance exercise can provide better blood sugar stability than Continue reading >>

6 Facts People With Type 1 Diabetes Want You To Know

6 Facts People With Type 1 Diabetes Want You To Know

When you hear the word “diabetes”, you likely associate the condition with the body’s inability to process sugar properly. You also probably know that factors like genetics or being overweight can put you at risk, and factors like exercise and a strict diet can help reduce symptoms and risk of diabetes. However, all of these commonly known facts actually relate to type 2 diabetes, not type 1. That’s not surprising, considering of the twenty-four million people living with diabetes in the U.S., only about 10% of them have type 1. While they share the same name, type 1 is actually pretty different than its counterpart, with varied symptoms and risk factors. Unlike type 2 diabetes in which the body has too little insulin, or can’t use it effectively, people with type 1 have little to no insulin at all. In fact, it’s classified as an autoimmune disease because the body’s immune system actually attacks insulin-producing cells. However, without any insulin, cells can’t absorb the glucose needed to produce energy. Therefore, anyone with type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day to survive, using a pen, syringe, or pump. Unfortunately, there’s no way to prevent type 1 diabetes no matter how many healthy habits you adopt, nor is there a cure. That said, lifestyle factors like diet and exercise are still useful to help manage symptoms. To learn more about the condition, watch this video to learn six important facts about type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

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