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Insulin Resistance And Rice

How To Reverse Diabetes With Zero Weight Loss

How To Reverse Diabetes With Zero Weight Loss

Since the 1970’s when the Atkins diet first gained popularity, carbohydrates have been thrown under the bus and blamed for a host of metabolic disorders including diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cancer and insulin resistance. This anti-carbohydrate literature will lead you to believe that carbohydrates cause total-body inflammation, setting the stage for a host of complex metabolic disorders that can only be solved by eliminating carbohydrates from your diet. In this article you will learn exactly how to reverse diabetes in a matter of weeks following a highly unconventional approach. It’s easy to believe these claims, because they are always backed up by scientific research and communicated using fancy words that are very convincing. Because of this, low carbohydrate diets have taken the world by storm, resulting in millions of people who actively avoid eating any form of carbohydrate, whether from refined sources like bread, cereal, pasta, rice and artificial sweeteners, or from whole sources like fruits and starchy vegetables. The words “low carb” and “no carb” are printed on labels, boxes and packages, feeding the anti-carbohydrate frenzy and strengthening the stance against this alleged dietary criminal. Visit your nearby bookstore and you’ll find entire books written on the subject of carbohydrates, with authors making wild claims that “there is no biological need for carbohydrates in your diet,” arguing that our Paleolithic ancestors subsisted for thousands of years on diets low in carbohydrate energy or completely devoid of carbohydrate altogether. Is any of this true? Are carbohydrates the cause of our generation’s ailing health? Scientists Reverse Diabetes Using a Diet High in … Sugar As early as 1930, physicians at the Montreal General Continue reading >>

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice Wild rice is becoming more popular around the world. Not only is the grain delicious, but its highly nutritious, and many scientists are studying to food to validate its wide range of proposed health benefits. Wild rice provide a great combination of fiber, antioxidants and minerals, that are essential for protecting against many diseases and health conditions. The grain is even great for the fight against diabetes. Studies show that wild rice have the ability to help balance sugar levels in the body. In a study published in the journal Nutrients in 2013, researchers suggested that switching out portions of starchy dietary carbohydrates for wild rice may help to reduce insulin resistance and improve other markers of health. In their study the scientists saw that when they replaced white rice for wild rice in the participants, it had the effect of reducing insulin resistance, and also reduced triglyceride. In other study, the scientists saw that even in a diet high in cholesterol and fat, wild rice was able to impose its healthy effects on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. The researchers suggested that the high levels of fiber, magnesium, and other essential minerals in wild rice help to regulate the metabolism. Wild rice has a nutty, rich flavor and can be used in wide variety of recipes, including salads, soups, pasta dishes, and stir-fries. The grain can be purchase in many health food stores around the world. Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And White Rice

Insulin Resistance And White Rice

1 Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; emails: [email protected] , [email protected] ; fax +603-8947-2116. 2 Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Dietary factors and habits are now known to induce intrauterine molecular reprogramming events in growing fetuses with consequent increase in the risk of type 2 diabetes1. Additionally, epigenetic mechanisms as a result of dietary factors may well be contributing towards the rising incidence of type 2 diabetes globally. In view of this, we started to look closely at white (polished) rice, which is a major staple food for people in countries where the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is projected to be highest in the near future. This rising trend and the recent links between rice consumption and type 2 diabetes 2,3 was the reason why we took an interest in the possible contribution of white rice to diabetes incidents. The first part of our study published recently in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research 4 demonstrates how consumption of white rice by rats could increase the risk of insulin resistance in their offsprings possibly through epigenetic mechanisms. We observed hyperleptinamia, hypoadiponectinemia, increased retinol binding protein 4, high homeostatic model of insulin resistance and worsening of oral glucose tolerance test, consistent with higher risk of insulin resistant and other metabolic perturbations in rats that consumed white rice and their offsprings, in comparison with brown rice groups, respectively. Additionally, the expression patterns of insulin signaling genes across insulin sensitive tissues (liver, adipose an Continue reading >>

Top 10 Myths About Insulin Resistance Diet

Top 10 Myths About Insulin Resistance Diet

Information Top 10 Myths about Insulin Resistance Diet Top 10 Myths about Insulin Resistance Diet Lets face it. When it comes to the insulin resistance diet, there is very little reliable and useful information available on the web. When I was first diagnosed with it, I spent weeks researching the condition, what it means, the food I am supposed to eat and whether you can reverse it . The more I looked into it, the more I became frustrated at how much incorrect information was out there. Dont believe me? Check it out for yourself. Youll find sites devoted to selling you hype, motivation and before you do anything, buy this book. Search through Pinterest, and the misleading information that makes my sugar bloods boil. So in the interest of clarity, here are the top 10 myths about the insulin resistance based on popular information found on the internet. Myth 1 If its sugar-free, its ok for the IR Diet. This one makes me the angriest so it deserves to be at no 1. Look up most recipes that claim to be sugar-free and youll find they use ingredients like honey, agave syrup, maple syrup, corn syrup, rice malt syrup and so on. Or worse, an artificial sweetener full of chemicals. Or stevia, which is claimed to be a natural sweetener but can cause diarrhea. That side effect aside, if youre into adding chemicals to your body, its your choice. Id rather go without artificial sweeteners. In most things you read, particularly someone who has turned it into a religion, giving up sugar means giving up fructose. Whether its sucrose (table sugar), fructose (found naturally in fruit and vegetables), glucose (or dextrose), most fruits and vegetables including low starch have a degree of sugar and carbs. When Im looking for a sugar-free dessert, I expect no sugar or sweetener. But it seem Continue reading >>

Resistant Starch-rich Wx/ae Brown Rice Prevents Insulin Resistance And Hypertriglyceridaemia In Type 2 Diabetic Nsy Mice

Resistant Starch-rich Wx/ae Brown Rice Prevents Insulin Resistance And Hypertriglyceridaemia In Type 2 Diabetic Nsy Mice

Resistant starch-rich wx/ae brown rice prevents insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridaemia in type 2 diabetic NSY mice Author links open overlay panel KenjiMatsumotoa A rice cultivar called wx/ae is rich in resistant starch. The effect of wx/ae brown rice on type 2 diabetes was examined in the mouse model. Intake of wx/ae brown rice prevented insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridaemia. Gene expression analysis in the liver and white adipose tissue was carried out. A rice cultivar called wx/ae, double mutant in waxy (wx) and amylose extender (ae) genes, is rich in resistant starch. Type 2 diabetic NSY mice were fed a test diet containing 30% roasted wx/ae brown rice (wx/ae group) or its parental rice cultivar Kinmaze brown rice (WT group) for 16 weeks. The insulin sensitivity of the wx/ae group was significantly higher than that of the WT group, and the concentrations of fasting plasma triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids were lower. Gene expression analysis of the liver revealed that expression levels of insulin-dependent genes and bile acid-related genes in the two groups were significantly different. Moreover, expression of the G protein-coupled receptor 43 gene in the epididymal white adipose tissue was significantly higher in the wx/ae group. These results indicate that wx/ae brown rice is a good candidate food for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and hypertriglyceridaemia. Continue reading >>

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Symptoms - Best Diet, Treatment And How To Reverse

Insulin Resistance Symptoms - Best Diet, Treatment And How To Reverse

Before we discuss how to identify the presence of insulin resistance symptoms in your life you must first understand the role of insulin in your body. When we eat sugar or any food that breaks down into sugar in the body, this elevates the body's glucose levels. Glucose is the technical term for blood sugar. When blood sugar rises, then the pancreas has the job of bringing it back down again, and it does so by releasing insulin. When the pancreas releases insulin, this alerts the glucose receptors to open and one of three things occur. It is taken into the cell immediately and used for energy, then any excess glucose either gets stored in the liver as glycogen which can be used at a later date as needed, or it's stored as fat in the cell. There is always more sugar than the body needs when one eats sugar and carbohydrates, so a great deal of it is getting stored as fat. Glucose is essential for the mind and body to function adequately, however you don't want too much or too little. Too much leads to things like insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, while too little leads to things like hypoglycemia and lack of energy. Unfortunately, many people don't notice the arrival of insulin resistance symptoms before its too late, because they have not been educated about what to look for and the diet they have been led to believe is healthy is really at the root. Every time you eat sugar or a food that gets broken down into sugar, including starches, beans and whole grains, then your body goes through the process described above. If you are continually ingesting foods that force the body to go through this process, then over time their is too much sugar for the pancreas to handle. Each time it detects sugar in the blood stream, then it releases insulin. The liver can only store Continue reading >>

Predisposition To Insulin Resistance And Obesity Due To Staple Consumption Of Rice: Amylose Content Versus Germination Status

Predisposition To Insulin Resistance And Obesity Due To Staple Consumption Of Rice: Amylose Content Versus Germination Status

Predisposition to insulin resistance and obesity due to staple consumption of rice: Amylose content versus germination status Bilyaminu Abubakar , Data curation, Formal analysis, Investigation, Methodology, Software, Validation, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing,1,2,* Norhasnida Zawawi , Data curation, Formal analysis, Investigation, Validation, Writing review & editing,3 Abdul Rahman Omar , Funding acquisition, Project administration, Supervision, Validation, Writing review & editing,4 and Maznah Ismail , Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Methodology, Resources, Supervision, Validation, Writing review & editing1,* 1 Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia 2 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria 3 Department of Food Science, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia 1 Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia 2 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria 3 Department of Food Science, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia 4 Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Hospital Infantil Universitario Nino Jesus, SPAIN Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Received 2017 Feb 15; Accepted 2017 Jun 29. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, d Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For Insulin Resistance

Diet Tips For Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance increases your risk for developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. But a diagnosis of insulin resistance is only a warning sign. You may be able to prevent diabetes with healthy lifestyle choices, including regular exercise and eating a balanced diet. Generally, it’s best to choose whole, unprocessed foods and avoid highly processed and prepared foods. Foods that are highly processed, such as white breads, pastas, rice, and soda, digest very quickly and spike blood sugar levels. This puts extra stress on the pancreas, which makes the hormone insulin. Saturated fats have also been associated with insulin resistance. Healthy, unsaturated fats, such as those recommended below, are a better choice. Eating high-fiber foods and mixed meals, not just carbohydrates alone, can help slow digestion and take pressure off the pancreas. Here are some foods that you can mix and match to create satisfying but healthy dishes for any meal. Vegetables Vegetables are low in calories and high in fiber, making them an ideal food for people trying to manage their blood sugar. The best options are fresh, low-sodium canned, and frozen vegetables. Healthy options include tomatoes, spinach, colorful peppers, greens such as spinach. collard, and kale, and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Vegetable juices may seem healthy, but they tend to be not as filling and aren’t as fibrous as fresh vegetables. Fruits Munch on some fruit for fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Choose fresh or frozen fruits. Canned varieties without added sugars are fine in a pinch, but they don’t have the fiber that fresh and frozen fruits do since the skins are removed. Go for fruits that are higher in fiber, such as apples, berries, bananas, grapes, plums, and p Continue reading >>

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

When it comes to your risk of diabetes, a new study by Harvard researchers suggests that eating less white rice could make a difference. Each additional daily serving of white rice, a staple of Asian diets, may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 10%, according to the study, which analyzed the results of four previous studies involving 352,384 participants from four countries: China, Japan, U.S. and Australia. Those who ate the highest amounts of white rice had a 27% higher risk of diabetes than those who ate the least, and the risk was most pronounced in Asian people. The studies followed people for anywhere from 4 to 22 years, tracking their food intake. All the participants were diabetes-free at the beginning of the study. MORE: Five Ways to Avoid Diabetes — Without Medications Why white rice may impact diabetes risk isn’t clear, but it may have to do with the food’s high score on the glycemic index (GI) — a measurement of how foods affect blood sugar levels — meaning that it can cause spikes in blood sugar. High GI ranking foods have previously been associated with increased risk of diabetes. “White rice also lacks nutrients like fiber and magnesium,” says study author Qi Sun, a professor of medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “People with high white rice consumption lack these beneficial nutrients and Asian populations consume a lot of white rice. If you consume brown rice instead, you will get these nutrients. There are alternatives.” But before you swear off white rice for good, the study authors and other nutrition experts caution that it’s not the only culprit in diabetes risk. Rather, a general decrease in physical activity and increase in food consumption may be responsible for the rise in obesity and insulin res Continue reading >>

Diet Tips To Improve Insulin Resistance

Diet Tips To Improve Insulin Resistance

Insulin is a hormone that helps the body absorb glucose, keeping blood sugar levels in balance. Insulin resistance makes it harder for glucose to be absorbed. This causes problems for muscles, fat, and the liver, as they need glucose (sugar). Over time, insulin resistance can cause high blood sugar levels and damage cells. Insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes. People with insulin resistance are often diagnosed with prediabetes. They may need extra checks to make sure they don't develop diabetes. Diet and other lifestyle choices can increase the risks related to insulin resistance. Making diet changes can reduce insulin insensitivity. This reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes and the health problems that go with it. Contents of this article: Understanding insulin resistance Glucose is a vital source of energy for the body. However, many of the body's cells can't absorb glucose on their own. The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. It joins up with glucose, and travels to the body's cells, where it attaches to insulin receptors. Insulin allows the cells to absorb glucose, making sure that: blood sugar levels remain at a safe level muscle, fat, liver, and other cells are able to get energy Insulin resistance makes cells less sensitive to insulin. This means the body has to produce more insulin to keep blood sugar levels healthy. If the pancreas is unable to keep up with the increased demand for insulin, blood sugar levels go up. When this happens, cells can't use all of the excess glucose in the blood. This leads to type 2 diabetes. Diet tips Following a healthful diet plan, such as the Mediterranean Diet, can improve insulin sensitivity. This diet recommends eating lots of seasonal plant-based foods, having fruit as a dessert, and olive oil as the main Continue reading >>

Therapeutic Diet For Insulin Resistance

Therapeutic Diet For Insulin Resistance

Home Dr. Rachelle S. Bradley Solutions Counseling Naturopathic Medicine Homeopathy Self-care Nutrition Prevention & Healing Policies/Fees/Contact Links Events/Lectures Return to the Nutrition main page Therapeutic Diet for Insulin Resistance This moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-protein and moderate-fat diet is focused on real foods as the solution to Insulin Resistance Syndrome (IR), sometimes called Metabolic Syndrome, Syndrome X, or pre-diabetes. It is mainly refined foods, especially sweets and refined flour products, combined with deficient exercise that gets people into trouble. A program based on whole foods, not more refined food products, is the best long-term solution in IR, and a host of other health problems as well. It is also recommended to take a good multiple vitamin/mineral. Based on human evolutionary history and physiology this should be your most natural and optimal diet. It reflects what our Paleolithic ancestors (i.e., before agriculture) evolved eating over a million years and, as such, has the highest potential of supporting healing and preventing disease. In addition, this diet is naturally alkalizing, which is considered by some people to be healthier than the typical American acidifying diet. If you need more recipe support than this handout provides, a popular diet that is close to this IR diet is The South Beach Diet by Arthur Agatston, M.D. We also recommended reading The Paleo Diet by Loren Cordain, Ph.D. It gives a good background on the problems of the modern diet and the advantages of the Paleolithic diet. However, use this handout as your main reference and refer to these books only for background and recipes. It will take at least 2 to 3 months to reestablish normal insulin sensitivity. If there is severe IR or obesity it could take mu Continue reading >>

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