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Insulin Resistance After Chemotherapy

Insulin Resistance And Inflammation In Black Women With And Without Breast Cancer: Cause For Concern

Insulin Resistance And Inflammation In Black Women With And Without Breast Cancer: Cause For Concern

Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Black Women with and without Breast Cancer: Cause for Concern We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Black Women with and without Breast Cancer: Cause for Concern Kathleen A. Griffith, Seon-Yoon Chung, [...], and Alice S. Ryan After chemotherapy for breast cancer, Black women gain more weight and have an increased mortality rate compared with White women. Our study objective was to compare biomarkers associated with obesity in Black women with and without a history of breast cancer. Black women with a history of breast cancer (cases) and age-matched controls. Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR); inflammation (TNF-, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, CRP); lipids (cholesterol, triglycerides). We compared insulin resistance, inflammation, and lipids in overweight and obese Black women with a history of breast cancer (n=19), age similar controls (n=25), and older controls (n=32). Groups did not differ on mean body mass index (BMI), which was 35.4 kg/m2, 36.0 kg/m2, and 33.0 kg/m2, respectively. Cases had 1.6 and 1.38 times higher HOMA-IR values compared with age similar and older controls, respectively (P.001 for both). TNF- and IL-1b were significantly higher in cases compared with both control groups (P<.001 for both). IL-6 was also higher in cases compared with age-similar controls (P=.007), and IL-8 was lower in cases compared with older controls (P<.05). Lipids di Continue reading >>

A Study Looking At Body Changes During Chemotherapy And Nutritional Support For People Having Treatment For Stomach Or Oesophageal Cancer

A Study Looking At Body Changes During Chemotherapy And Nutritional Support For People Having Treatment For Stomach Or Oesophageal Cancer

A study looking at body changes during chemotherapy and nutritional support for people having treatment for stomach or oesophageal cancer A study looking at body changes during chemotherapy and nutritional support for people having treatment for stomach or oesophageal cancer Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available. This is a study looking at body changes during chemotherapy before surgery for stomach or oesophageal cancer and whether a programme to help improve nourishment could help people having this type of treatment. Stomach cancer and oesophageal cancer can both cause problems with swallowing. If this happens, you may not be able to eat normally and so may not be able to get enough nourishment from your diet. Treatment to try to cure stomach cancer or oesophageal cancer is usually chemotherapy followed by surgery . Chemotherapy can make you feel sick or eat less. This can make you even more malnourished and you may lose muscle from your body during the chemotherapy. Then the side effects of chemotherapy can be even worse. If you cannot eat properly, you may also become less able to respond to that regulates the amount of sugar in your blood and plays an important role in how your body uses the energy you get from food. Earlier studies have shown that people with greater insulin resistance may have more complications after surgery and take longer to recover. In this study, researchers want to see what happens to your body during chemotherapy. This includes seeing if the amount of muscle in your body changes or your insulin resistance increases. The study will then look at whether a nutritional support programme can help. The programme will include advice from a You may be able to enter this study if Continue reading >>

The Links Between Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, And Cancer

The Links Between Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, And Cancer

The Links Between Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cancer Etan Orgel , MD, MS and Steven D. Mittelman , MD, PhD Jonathan Jaques Childrens Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Miller Childrens Hospital, 2801 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90806, 562-933-8600 phone Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Blvd., MS #93, Los Angeles, CA 90027, 323-361-7653 phone Etan Orgel, Jonathan Jaques Childrens Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Miller Childrens Hospital, 2801 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90806, 562-933-8600 phone; The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Curr Diab Rep See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. The growing epidemic of obesity has resulted in a large increase in multiple related diseases. Recent evidence has strengthened the proposed synergistic relationship between obesity-related insulin resistance (IR) and/or diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer. Within the past year, many studies have examined this relationship. Although the precise mechanisms and pathways are uncertain, it is becoming clear that hyperinsulinemia and possibly sustained hyperglycemia are important regulators of not only the development of cancer but also of treatment outcome. Further, clinical decision-making regarding the treatment of choice for DM will likely be impacted as we learn more about the non-metabolic effects of the available hyperglycemic agents. In our review, we endeavored to synthesize the recent literature and provide a concise view of the journey from macro-level clinical associations to specific mechanistic relationships being elucidated in cell lines and animal models. Keywords: Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Inflammation In Black Women With And Without Breast Cancer: Cause For Concern | Griffith | Ethnicity & Disease

Insulin Resistance And Inflammation In Black Women With And Without Breast Cancer: Cause For Concern | Griffith | Ethnicity & Disease

Comparisons made to BC group using t-tests. Associated P values are reported. a. Indicates variable transformed for analysis. Comparisons between Women with BC and Older Controls Compared with women without BC in the older control group, fasting glucose levels for those with BC were 1.58 times higher (P=.024); insulin was 1.63 times higher and HOMA-IR 1.38 times higher in the BC group (P<.001 for both). Inflammatory markers of IL-1b and TNF were elevated in the BC group compared to the older controls (1.9 times and 2.7 times higher, respectively; p<.001 for both). IL-8, conversely, was slightly but significantly higher in the older control group than in the BC group (P<.05). No differences in lipids were noted between these two groups. Similar to what was found in the younger control group, waist-hip ratio was also 12% higher in the BC group compared with older control group (P<.001). We identified significant insulin resistance in this obese, non-diabetic population of Black BC survivors; this factor may contribute to increased risk of BC recurrence in addition to the well-documented risk of type 2 diabetes. Obese patients often develop insulin resistance, with various tissues showing low cell sensitivity to insulin activity, resulting in a chronic compensatory hyperinsulinemia. By continuously stimulating insulin signalling in sensitive tissues, high levels of circulating insulin cause increased cell division and reduced cell death. 18 , 23 Although exact mechanisms remain unknown, hyperinsulinemia and the commensurate increase of insulin-like growth factors, may play a role in BC recurrence in insulin-resistant patients. Elevated glucose levels and insulin resistance have been strongly associated with BC recurrence. 15 , 16 Our comparisons of the BC group and both c Continue reading >>

Chemotherapy Causes Resistance & Spread Of Cancer

Chemotherapy Causes Resistance & Spread Of Cancer

To discuss your treatment options call (480) 834-5414 | [email protected] Chemotherapy Causes Resistance & Spread of Cancer Chemotherapy Causes Resistance and Spread of Cancer IPT to the Rescue Peter Nelson of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle co-authored a study and published it in Nature Medicine this month detailing how chemotherapy not only produces resistance to chemotherapy by cancerous tumors but also stimulates its growth and metastasis (spread). Approximately 90% of people with metastatic cancer become resistant to chemotherapy. This occurs readily in cancers of the breast, prostate, lung, pancreas and colon. It was a surprise to researchers that a protein, previously identified as being involved in the development of normal cells, as well as some cancer cells, can be found in relatively high concentrations in the environment surrounding tumors having been treated with chemotherapy. This protein, referred to as WNT16B, is taken up by nearby cancer cells, causing them to grow, invade, and importantly, resist subsequent therapy, said Peter Nelson of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Also, it came as quite a surprise that the fibroblasts, which are necessary for connective tissue strength, growth, and maintenance, as well as a myriad of other functions from wound healing to immunity, produce WNT16B in abundance due to exposure to excessive amounts of chemotherapy. Even though this study has caused quite a buzz in the media, there is really nothing new about this information. It has long been known that more than 60% of people undergoing conventional treatment for cancer die as a result of the treatment, not the cancer. These deaths are most often the consequence of infection producing overwhelming sepsis (bacteria Continue reading >>

Double Jeopardy: Treating Diabetes & Cancer

Double Jeopardy: Treating Diabetes & Cancer

Double Jeopardy: Treating Diabetes & Cancer Diabetes is already a complex chronic disease that requires a diligent treatment regimen. When cancer is added, diabetes management may require a Herculean effort both for the patient and the endocrinologists who treat them. Diabetes is one of the more complex chronic diseases, requiring treatment through not only lifestyle and dietary measures, but a finely tuned medication regimen that may include insulin and one or more oral agents. But add cancer on top of it, and diabetes management may require what feels like a Herculean eff ort both for patients and the endocrinologists who treat them. Chemotherapy and pain drugs can aff ect glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity, drug-drug interactions can interfere with the patients tolerance for diabetes drugs, and the decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, and consequent weight loss of both illness and cancer treatment can wreak havoc with a patients blood glucose. When it comes to cancer drugs, corticosteroids are the 800- pound gorilla in the room, says Victor Lavis, MD, professor in the Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Theyre a major part of chemotherapy and widely used for amelioration of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, as well as to suppress neurological symptoms when cancer has metastasized to the spine or brain. And they induce hyperglycemia. An observational study appearing in the December 2013Current Oncology found that blood glucose rose significantly in the hours following administration of corticosteroids in cancer patients with diabetes, as detected by blood glucose checks taken six hours after the patients received the drugs. The researchers found that the pa Continue reading >>

The Relationship Of Insulin Resistance And Cancer: A Botanical Approach

The Relationship Of Insulin Resistance And Cancer: A Botanical Approach

Home Cancer The Relationship of Insulin Resistance and Cancer: A Botanical Approach The Relationship of Insulin Resistance and Cancer: A Botanical Approach Posted by Donnie on Nov 12, 2013 in Cancer , Healing Medicine , Herbs and Nutrients , Recent Post | 1 comment Its well known that elevated fasting blood sugar is a precursor to diabetes. Less well known, but increasingly recognized, is that elevated fasting serum glucose and/or insulin levels are also risk factors for cancer, and the risk grows as fasting blood sugar and insulin levels rise. With the escalation of obesity and diabetes worldwide, it is important to recognize these diseases as causative factors for cancer development, especially for older individuals. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is a complex network essential for normal embryonic and postnatal growth, and plays an important role in the function of healthy immune function and bone growth, among other physiological functions. However, deregulation of the IGF system leads to stimulation of cancer cell growth and survival, as well as cancer invasion and resistance to many targeted drug therapies and chemotherapy agents. When insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is over-expressed, there is an effect on the relationship of the receptor to other biological factors involved in cancer, including estrogen receptors, the HER II neu receptor, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K). Awareness of these relationships could help in our understanding of breast and other cancer biology, and the importance of the IGF-IR in cancer progression and in the effective management of cancer. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which cells fail to respond efficiently to the normal actions of the hormone insulin. Because of this dysfunction, insulin Continue reading >>

Impact Of Hyperglycemia On The Efficacy Of Chemotherapya Systematic Review Of Preclinical Studies

Impact Of Hyperglycemia On The Efficacy Of Chemotherapya Systematic Review Of Preclinical Studies

Impact of hyperglycemia on the efficacy of chemotherapyA systematic review of preclinical studies Author links open overlay panel Maaike C.Gerardsa Antineoplastic agents can provoke hyperglycemia in cancer patients with and without diabetes mellitus. We systematically reviewed the impact of hyperglycemia on the efficacy of chemotherapy. MEDLINE was searched for preclinical intervention studies which compared chemotherapy response in hyperglycemic and euglycemic conditions. Thirteen preclinical studies, including 23 cell lines and 2 animal experiments were identified. In 14 cell lines and 2 animal studies, chemotherapy response was lower in a hyperglycemic (>15mmol/L) compared to a euglycemic environment (5mmol/L). The response was similar in 4 cell lines. In the remaining 5 cell lines, the hyperglycemic environment potentiated chemotherapy efficacy. Hyperglycemia attenuated the antiproliferative effect of chemotherapy in preclinical experiments, but the results are inconsistent. Whether hyperglycemia influences efficacy of chemotherapy in patients needs to be explored. Continue reading >>

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Anti-cancer Medication

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Anti-cancer Medication

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated with Anti-Cancer Medication Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Thyroid Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea. Corresponding author: Eun Kyung Lee. Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Thyroid Cancer, National Cancer Center, 323 Ilsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang 10408, Korea. Tel: +82-31-920-1743, Fax: +82-31-920-2798, [email protected] Received 2017 Jan 16; Revised 2017 Feb 1; Accepted 2017 Feb 16. Copyright 2017 Korean Endocrine Society This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Hyperglycemia during chemotherapy occurs in approximately 10% to 30% of patients. Glucocorticoids and L-asparaginase are well known to cause acute hyperglycemia during chemotherapy. Long-term hyperglycemia is also frequently observed, especially in patients with hematologic malignancies treated with L-asparaginase-based regimens and total body irradiation. Glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycemia often develops because of increased insulin resistance, diminished insulin secretion, and exaggerated hepatic glucose output. Screening strategies for this condition include random glucose testing, hemoglobin A1c testing, oral glucose loading, and fasting plasma glucose screens. The management of hyperglycemia starts with insulin or sulfonylurea, depending on the type, dose, and delivery of the glucocorticoid formulation. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are associated with a high incidence of hyperglycemia, ranging from 13% to 50%. Immunotherapy, such as anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) antibody treatment, induces hyperglycem Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer Survivors Face Increased Diabetes Risk

Breast Cancer Survivors Face Increased Diabetes Risk

Breast Cancer Survivors Face Increased Diabetes Risk Postmenopausal women who have survived breast cancer are more likely to develop diabetes than women who never had breast cancer, a new study finds. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2012 Postmenopausal breast cancer survivors have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in part, it appears, as a consequence of receiving chemotherapy, according to a large study published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Researchers from Women's College Hospital in Toronto, Canada, compared the incidence of diabetes among women over 55 with breast cancer to that of women over 55 without breast cancer. Nearly 10 percent of the 24,976 breast cancer survivors and 120,000-plus controls developed diabetes. Women with breast cancer had an increased risk of 7 percent two years after their cancer diagnosis with a 21 percent increased risk after 10 years. Among patients who received chemotherapy , the risk went almost in the opposite direction: A 24 percent higher risk was identified two years after a cancer diagnosis, but after 10 years, the risk dropped to 8 percent. "It is possible that chemotherapy treatment may bring out diabetes earlier in susceptible women," explained researcher Lorraine Lipsombe, MD , in a release. "Increased weight gain has been noted in the setting for adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, which may be a factor in the increased risk of diabetes in women receiving treatment." The common risk factors for both conditions might also help explain the link, researchers write, particularly insulin resistance. Insu Continue reading >>

Adipokines, Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, And Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Cohort Study

Adipokines, Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, And Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Cohort Study

Adipokines, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and breast cancer recurrence: a cohort study Oh et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2011 Several in vitro studies have suggested the effects of adipokines and insulin resistance on breast cancer cell proliferation and survival. However, little is known about the clinical significance of these findings. We examined associations between breast cancer recurrence and adiponectin, leptin, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a cohort of 747 patients from 2001 to 2004. Adjusted hazard ratios showed an inverse trend across the quartiles for serum adiponectin concentration in estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) -negative patients (P for trend = 0.027) but not in ER/PR-positive patients. Compared to the highest quartile for adiponectin level, the lowest quartile showed a hazard ratio of 2.82 (1.03 to 7.68). Homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) showed a positive trend for recurrence in the ER/PR-negative group (P for trend = 0.087) and a negative trend in the ER/PR-positive group (P for trend = 0.081). Leptin did not show any associations (P for trend >0.05). A linear trend was observed with the number of components of MetS in ER/PR-negative patients (P for trend = 0.044). This association disappeared when adjusted for adiponectin and HOMA-IR. Adiponectin and HOMA-IR have prognostic significance in breast cancer recurrence and interventions related to these factors may protect against recurrence in ER/PR-negative patients. These findings were not observed in the case of ER/PR-positive patients. Further evaluation of these insignificant associations is needed because it might be biased by adjuvant chemotherapy or other confounders. Breast CancerInsulin ResistanceHuman Epider Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

Weight Change During Chemotherapy Changes The Prognosis In Non Metastatic Breast Cancer For The Worse

Weight Change During Chemotherapy Changes The Prognosis In Non Metastatic Breast Cancer For The Worse

Weight change during chemotherapy changes the prognosis in non metastatic breast cancer for the worse Thivat et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2010 Weight change during chemotherapy is reported to be associated with a worse prognosis in breast cancer patients, both with weight gain and weight loss. However, most studies were conducted prior to the common use of anthracycline-base chemotherapy and on North American populations with a mean BMI classified as overweight. Our study was aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of weight change during anthracycline-based chemotherapy on non metastatic breast cancer (European population) with a long term follow-up. Patients included 111 women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and locally advanced breast cancer who have been treated by anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimen between 1976 and 1989. The relative percent weight variation (WV) between baseline and postchemotherapy treatment was calculated and categorized into either weight change (WV > 5%) or stable (WV < 5%). The median follow-up was 20.4 years [19.4 - 27.6]. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate any potential association of weight change and known prognostic factors with the time to recurrence and overall survival. Baseline BMI was 24.4 kg/m2 [17.1 - 40.5]. During chemotherapy treatment, 31% of patients presented a notable weight variation which was greater than 5% of their initial weight. In multivariate analyses, weight change (> 5%) was positively associated with an increased risk of both recurrence (RR 2.28; 95% CI: 1.29-4.03) and death (RR 2.11; 95% CI: 1.21-3.66). Our results suggest that weight change during breast-cancer chemotherapy treatment may be related to poorer prognosis with higher reccurence and higher mortality in compariso Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer Topic: Tamoxifen And Insulin Resistance

Breast Cancer Topic: Tamoxifen And Insulin Resistance

Hi Andrea, I'm in the same boat: prediabetic and on Tamoxifen. I'm sure you've read about the connection between tamoxifen and diabetes . I tried to reverse my prediabetes for years before diagnosis (there is a correlation between insulin resistance and breast cancer), and fortunately have always been able to get my A1C down with exercise, like 30 minutes a day. But after chemo and steroids every week for 3-5 months, my A1C was higher than ever, 6.0. Your 5.5 A1C was actually pretty close to prediabetes. The range has changed a bit from year to year; some docs even consider anything over 4.8 to be abnormal. So that 5.5 was technically fine but could have been a wakeup call. It's frustrating as hell. I'm not overweight, I run or exercise four hours a week, I don't eat a ton of sugar (though I could do better), and I've been gluten-free/low-carb for five years--yet the darn number keeps creeping up. Yes, I think Tamoxifen is partly to blame. See if your doctor will prescribe Metformin. My friend is on a clinical now, just wrapping up, that is studying Metformin's effects on breast cancer recurrence. So far it looks promising. I started Metformin six months ago. It brought my A1C down a little, and I know I can bring it down even more if I exercise 30 minutes every day. Another tip my doctor gave me: weight lifting. Muscle burns more calories even during rest. Have I done this yet? No! It's humiliating to do push-ups when I can barely do one. But I might take a HIIT class or CrossFit to see if that motivates me. Let me know if you find any solutions! I'm going to fight it for as long as I can. Dx 10/7/2014, IDC, 2cm, Stage IIB, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2+ Chemotherapy 11/12/2014 AC Targeted Therapy 1/8/2015 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Targeted Therapy 1/8/2015 Herceptin (trastuzumab Continue reading >>

Leptin, Insulin And Body Composition Changes During Adjuvant Taxane Based Chemotherapy In Patients With Breast Cancer, Preliminary Study Alacacioglu A, Kebapcilar L, Gokgoz Z, Oztekin O, Bozkaya G, Tarhan O, Somali I, Yuksel A, Sop G, Sari I - Indian J Cancer

Leptin, Insulin And Body Composition Changes During Adjuvant Taxane Based Chemotherapy In Patients With Breast Cancer, Preliminary Study Alacacioglu A, Kebapcilar L, Gokgoz Z, Oztekin O, Bozkaya G, Tarhan O, Somali I, Yuksel A, Sop G, Sari I - Indian J Cancer

Background: The objectives of the present study were to compare the effect of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer on serum insulin levels, serum leptin levels, and body composition in early stage breast cancer patients.Materials and Methods: 17 breast cancer patients underwent 6 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg), epirubicine (100 mg) and cyclophosphamide (500 mg) (TEC). Anthropometrical and foot-to-foot body fat analyzer BIA, serum glucose, insulin, lipids, HOMA-IR and leptin were compared pre- and post-treatment. Results: There was no statistically significant weight gain after treatment; however, there was an overall trend toward weight gain (69.7 9.8 kg vs 71.03 9.8; P= 0.05). From baseline to the end of the study, percentage of body fat and body fat mass showed an upward trend at the end of chemotherapy (1%; 2 kg P> 0.05). Pre and post-treatment period, leptin was strongly correlated with insulin and HOMA-IR (Spearman's pre-T; r = 0.74; P <0.001, r = 0.66; P = 0.004 post-T; r = 0.549; P =0.022, r = 0.51; P =0.036, respectively). Insulin levels were significantly increased in the post-treatment period (P < 0.05). On correlation analysis, post-T insulin levels were correlated with leptin, weight, fat-mass and fat percentage (Spearman's r = 0.549; P=.022, r = 0.567; P= 0.018, r = 0.498, P= 0.042, r = 0.502; P= 0.040, respectively). DISCUSSION: High insulin and leptin levels, important factors that were previously shown to be related to breast cancer outcome, and insulin resistance may be increased in taxane based chemotherapy regimen. These data may have broad implications for diet and lifestyle strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. Keywords:Breast cancer, chemotherapy, insulin, leptin, taxane Alacacioglu A, Kebapcilar L, Gokgoz Z, Oztekin O, Bozkaya G Continue reading >>

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