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Insulin Potentiation Therapy Doctors

Insulin Potentiation Therapy

Insulin Potentiation Therapy

LEMMO > Cancer Care > Insulin Potentiation Therapy The hormone Insulin (the same one that is used in Diabetes) appears to have several advantages in the treatment of cancer & other diseases. There is a family line of doctors from Mexico that have been pioneering the use Insulin since the 1930s. With over 75 years of combined clinical experience, they have observed how the use of Insulin allows for the entry of important medications (i.e. chemotherapy) into cells (i.e. cancer) with greater ease. As a consequence, you need a smaller amount of chemotherapy medicine(s) to do the similar job as standard approaches. This treatment is commonly referred to as Insulin Potentiation Therapy or simply IPT for short. This is why those that use IPT along with chemotherapy call it a more gentle and yet effective form of cancer treatment. Even though chemotherapy medicines are used, you typically require 1/10th the dose which translates into less toxic amounts that are needed to attain a therapeutic effect. While this treatment is still considered experimental and there is a limited amount of research published, the clinical benefits look promising. Most of the data out there is considered anecdotal by scientific standards even though positive clinical experiences on various cancer cases have been presented to the National Institute of Health (NIH) in the US. In a 2003 research paper studying the use of IPT in a small group of patients with advanced breast cancer, IPT produced positive results in this group who were resistant to standard chemotherapy approaches. Dr. Lemmo has been fortunate to be trained in hospital by Dr. Donato Perez Garciathe last of the family line of physicians who have pioneered this treatment. IPT works in killing cancer based on a simple concept that several c Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Providing Help and Support When you Need it Most No severe disease or chronic illnesscan exist in an individual with an intact and fully functional immune system! Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) is a therapeutic procedure which utilizes low doses of conventional chemotherapeutic agents on a more frequent schedule to reduce or eliminate the toxic side effects of the drugs. It maintains the effectiveness of the drug by potentiating its anti-cancer activity with the use of insulin. A historical and theoretical discussion of IPT and how it works is covered below. The major limitation of chemotherapy is its extreme toxic effect on all bodily functions, particularly the blood, digestive and immune systems. It comes down to whether we can kill the cancer without killing the patient. Lowering the overall toxicity of the drug while continuing to kill the cancer cells is the primary goal of IPT. Patients who do not become nauseous and whose digestive system continues to function have better nutrition and lose less weight while undergoing treatment. Keeping a higher red blood cell count contributes to better health, especially for those patients with respiratory complications. Maintaining a functioning immune system helps fight off infectious diseases. However, this can become a problem following conventional chemotherapy. Often overlooked is a major potential of IPT and its most important advantage the ability to aggressively pursue immune therapy while simultaneously using chemotherapy, a combined treatment which is usually not possible with the standard high-dose chemotherapy approach. Immune therapy is frequently ignored because chemotherapy is considered the first line of treatment; the result is a highly suppressed immune system which consequently cannot respond to drugs Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy And Cancer

Insulin Potentiation Therapy And Cancer

Donato Perez Garcia, a medical doctor from Mexico, developed IPT in the early 1930s. In 1939, he registered the treatment with the U.S. Patent Office as a treatment for syphilis and neurosyphilis . Some argue it reduces or removes negative side effects of chemo without reducing overall effectiveness of the treatment. Garcias son and grandson continued working with IPT. In a 1986 paper , they argued IPT can be used as an adjunct when managing chronic diseases. They said insulin naturally makes cell membranes more permeable. This is because cancer cells have more insulin receptors than normal cells. When insulin is released into the bloodstream in response to a change in blood sugar levels, the insulin attaches to these cells and allow nutrients to enter the cell. When the excess insulin receptors on cancer cells are activated, its theoretically easier to specifically target them for treatment. The theory is that when using it with chemotherapy, insulin makes the medication more effective. As a result, its argued that IPT targets cancer cells and requires less chemotherapy to get the same results. Less chemo drugs, then, mean fewer or less severe side effects. Apart from the lack of scientific or clinical evidence endorsing IPT, this treatment does carry a known set of risks. IPT carries a risk of developing hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This is potentially deadly. The body releases insulin naturally after a rise in blood sugar . Artificially introducing insulin, such as with IPT, can produce a rapid decrease in blood sugar. If your blood sugar falls low enough, you can experience: After the insulin is administered and blood sugar falls, IPT practitioners rapidly inject a cocktail of glucose and chemotherapy drugs in doses that are below the proven, effective amounts Continue reading >>

Ipt/iptld Treatment | Best Answer For Cancer Foundation

Ipt/iptld Treatment | Best Answer For Cancer Foundation

IPTLD: Targeting the Cancer Cells Not the Patient! Insulin Potentiation Targeted Low Dose therapy (IPTLD) is a procedure for targeting chemotherapeutic drugs directly to cancer cells, making the drugs tougher on the disease and easier on the rest of the body. Conventional chemotherapy tends to flood the body with drugs so enough will enter the cancer cells to kill them. Each of our trillions of cells has a membrane, an outer skin, that protects it from toxins. Standard chemotherapy must be given in large enough quantities to force penetration through that membrane. IPTLD, however, penetrates easily through the cell membrane because it goes in hand-in-hand with sugar (glucose). Cancer cells, unlike healthy cells, need lots of glucose for fuel. Without it, they die. The membrane of a cancer cell is designed to take in a lot more glucose than healthy cells. In medical parlance we say cancer cells are equipped with many more insulin receptors. So, what if we pair a small dose of chemo drugs with the glucose? Yes, the cancer cell takes in the chemotherapy drugs in its effort to get at the sugar. Using insulin allows us to differentiate the cancer cells from the normal cells. This is a significant advantage. When a doctor administers IPTLD, the first thing he or she does is to gently lower the patients blood sugar level with insulin, the same natural hormone diabetics use. The cancer cells, because they must have sugar to live, become ravenous and open thoseinsulin receptors wide to get at whatever they can find in the blood streams diminishing supply. When the blood sugar level has dropped enough, the doctor will administer a low dose of chemotherapy. The cancer cells take it in. The doctor then administers glucose which brings the patients blood sugar level back up to norm Continue reading >>

Does Anyone Know Anything About Ipt?

Does Anyone Know Anything About Ipt?

No, I havent registered yet register now By creating an account I accept Cancer Chat Terms & Conditions . Thanks for taking the time to read this. My Aunt was diagnosed with breast cancer last year and had a double-mastectomy. She was undergoing chemotherapy and appears to be progressing appropriately. I have since learned more about chemotherapy and I came across a hybrid treatment of sorts called Insulin Potentiated Therapy (IPT) . Have you heard of it? I tried finding forums, blogs and more about it for reviews, but I can't really locate anything? I did find an alternative cancer treatment centre (with lots of FAQs and similar) - but I still want to read "real patient" reviews. Do you know of any places I can learn more? From what I gather it is a mix of low-dose chemo and natural mixtures of nutrients meant to kill the cancer, while not going overboard and hurting other parts of your body. The reason I am interesting in this option is because I know chemo is so hard on the body. From the sounds of it, it's weakening, sickening and can outright hurt you. That being said, I understand the need for it and how it is one of (if not the best) option for killing cancer. So an option like this makes sense to me (not a Doctor, obviously) and I wanted to learn more. Thanks in advance and I appreciate your help pushing me in the right direction. 13 Jan 2014 21:51 in response to JillianOwens Have looked online and there are quite a few sites that give information about IPT - just put Insulin Potentiated Therapy in Google. I suggest you go on the Quackwatch site as it shows the dangers of this 'medication'. If your Aunt is responding well to conventional chemotherapy, in my opinion, you would be looking after her interests more if she continues with the course of treatment she Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy/low Dose Chemo For Cancer, Lyme & More: Medical Renegades Spark Medical Renaissance

Insulin Potentiation Therapy/low Dose Chemo For Cancer, Lyme & More: Medical Renegades Spark Medical Renaissance

Insulin Potentiation Therapy/Low Dose Chemo for Cancer, Lyme & More: Medical Renegades Spark Medical Renaissance by Simon Yu, MD | Dec 8, 2017 | Cancer , Medical Innovation , Treatment | Obama Care or NObama Care for medical politics aside, rather than accepting current medical care, what we need is a new Medical Renaissance based on New Biology. Renaissance Rebirth is always preceded by renegades who change the paradigm of current thinking by challenging the ruling authority. After traveling to Germany for Oktoberfest 2017, I gave a lecture at the International Insulin Potentiation Therapy/Low Dose (IPT/LD) Conference in Munich, Germany. The IPT/LD organization is run by Mexican physician Donato Perez Garcia, MD. I spoke on how to use Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) in other applications, without using low dose (LD) chemotherapy. Visiting Munich during Oktoberfest provided a convenient excuse to attend the conference. A small group of physicians less than 40 attended from South Africa, Kazakhstan, Mexico, USA, Europe, and elsewhere. They are a small group of medical renegades who will not conform to the conventional standard medical therapies. The main topic of the conference was using IPT/LD for Lyme and cancer treatments. I presented case studies of reversing stage 4lung cancers, stage 4 multiple myelomas, and an ALS case using integrative therapies including IPT, but without using low dose chemotherapy. All speakers spoke without fear of repercussion for unconventional approaches to treating Lyme disease and cancer using IPT/LD as a part of treatment plan. For more information on this treatment see, Insulin Therapy for other than Diabetes: Insulin Potentiation Therapy , which is available on the articles page of my website, . A physician from South Africa pointe Continue reading >>

Low-dose Chemotherapy With Insulin (insulin Potentiation Therapy) In Combination With Hormone Therapy For Treatment Of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

Low-dose Chemotherapy With Insulin (insulin Potentiation Therapy) In Combination With Hormone Therapy For Treatment Of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

Low-Dose Chemotherapy with Insulin (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) in Combination with Hormone Therapy for Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Medical Center Integrative Medicine, Deliiska Vodenitza Street, Bl. 330, 1592 Sofia, Bulgaria Received 2012 Jan 20; Accepted 2012 Feb 16. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Purpose. To evaluate the results and quality of life of patients with resistant of castration-resistant tumors previously treated with Insulin-potentiation therapy (IPT) combined with hormone therapy. Materials and methods. Sixteen patients with metastasis prostate tumors after bilateral castration, androgenic blockade, and progression of the disease were observed during the study. The patients were divided into two groups: group A consisting of 8 patients treated with low-dose chemotherapy Epirubicin, Vinblastine, and Cyclophosphamide combined with LHRH agonist and group B consisting of another 8 patients treated with low-dose chemotherapy Docetaxel combined with LHRH agonist. Results. The overall (groups A and B) results concerning PSA after the sixth IPT show partial effect in 8 out of 16 (50%) patients, stabilization in 4 out of 16 (25%), and progression in 4 out of 16 (25%). The median survival for all treated patients is 11,7 months (range 330 months). During the treatment no significant side effects were observed, and no lethal cases occurred. Conclusion. In spite of the small number of the treated patients with castration-resistant prostate tumors, the preliminary results are promising and this gives us hope Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy - Welcome To Cancer Cure Foundation

Insulin Potentiation Therapy - Welcome To Cancer Cure Foundation

Information from Steven Ayre's website: Chemotherapy drugs are powerful cell-killing agents. In current medical practice, getting these drugs into the inside of cells where they do their work requires that they be administered in doses high enough to force them across the membranes of cancer cells. A major drawback to this dosing strategy is a serious dose-related side effect profile frequently seen with anticancer drugs. This happens because chemotherapy agents do not discriminate between cancer cells and other normal cells in the patient's body. They kill both kinds of cells, therefore there are side effects. With recent advances in our understanding of the inner workings of cancer cells, it is now possible to avoid the dose-related side effects of chemotherapy, while at the same time increasing the effectiveness and specificity of these agents in killing cancer cells. The key to this is an innovative strategy for drug delivery called Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT). Readers will recognize insulin as being the hormone used to treat diabetes. Secreted by the pancreas in healthy people, insulin is a powerful hormone with many actions in the human body, a principal one being to manage the delivery of glucose across cell membranes into cells. Insulin communicates its messages to cells by joining up with specific insulin receptors scattered on the outer surface of the cell membranes. Every cell in the human body has some of these receptors, with there being from one hundred to one hundred thousand of them per cell. One might well ask, "What does any of this have to do with cancer cells?" It is a well-known scientific fact that cancer cells have a voracious appetite for glucose. Glucose is their unique source of energy, and because of the relatively inefficient way canc Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy In The Treatment Of Malignant Neoplastic Diseases: A Three Year Study

Insulin Potentiation Therapy In The Treatment Of Malignant Neoplastic Diseases: A Three Year Study

Oncology; Cancer treatment; Insulin potentiation targeted low dose; Low-dose chemotherapy A basic principle in the conventional administration of chemotherapy is the application of maximum tolerated doses at extended intervals of time. Despite the development of novel chemotherapeutics and varied combinations in numerous clinical trials, advancement has proven slow going and arduous. Difficulties such as poorly tolerated levels of toxicity, chemo resistance and an absence of significant prolongation of life expectancy are still unresolved. [ 1 - 3 ]. Efforts in the scientific community over the last decade or so, have led to a new strategy in the application of chemotherapeutics. So called metronomic chemotherapy involves the use of reduced doses of drugs at shorter intervals of time. Initial experimental and clinical results involving this strategy are promising and prompt further investigation [ 4 - 6 ]. A somewhat similar method in the application of chemotherapeutics likewise involves fractionated doses of conventional chemotherapeutics administered at short intervals. This method departs from the heretofore standard application of chemotherapy with the use of insulin as a biologic response modifier. Commonly referred to as Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) or Insulin Potentiation Targeted Low Dose (IPTLD), this method facilitates the selective targeting of malignant cells while sparing normal tissues, resulting in greatly reduced treatment toxicity and improved quality of life as reported by patients [ 7 - 11 ]. Insulin Potentiation Therapy was developed in 1932 by the Mexican military physician Donato Perez Garcia, who reported anecdotal success in clinical practice over the course of three decades. A proposed theoretical mechanism of action was developed scient Continue reading >>

List Of Clinics In The United States Offering Alternative Therapies - Welcome To Cancer Cure Foundation

List Of Clinics In The United States Offering Alternative Therapies - Welcome To Cancer Cure Foundation

The following doctors, clinics and hospitals provide alternative treatments for cancer in the United States. If you are interested in a clinic outside of the United States, go to Clinics Outside of the US , or to our list of Mexican Clinics , which we have recently put on its own web page. We also have a list of clinics that use a combination of alternative and conventional therapy to treat cancer. If you are interested in working with a naturopath, we have a web page devoted to naturopathic physicians and traditional naturopaths. If you would like to find a homeopath who works with individuals with cancer, go to our page devoted to homeopaths. The listing of a doctor or clinic here does not signify an endorsement by the Cancer Cure Foundation. We will add additional information about each clinic as soon as our staff has a chance to contact them. If we have a separate page for the clinic, there will be a hyperlink to that page. In addition, we are putting together a database that will include details including contact information, size of clinic, costs if available, whether they take insurance, etc. If you would like us to check our database to see if we have this information available on a particular clinic, or if you would like us to contact a clinic on your behalf, contact our office by emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , or by calling us at (800) 282-2873 or (805) 498-0185 9-5 PST. We have been asked to add contact information to our website - We are still confirming this information, so if you find any of the phone numbers, websites, or addresses are not accurate, please let ourThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Some people find it he Continue reading >>

Ipt (insulin Potentiation Therapy) For Cancer Treatment - Euromedfoundation.com

Ipt (insulin Potentiation Therapy) For Cancer Treatment - Euromedfoundation.com

IPT is an alternative cancer treatment that has almost none of the side effects such as nausea, radical hair loss, liver damage, and DNA distortion that we see routinely with standard chemotherapy. The key to IPT as a cancer cure is the bodys own hormone. To learn more about IPT , please take a moment to view a presentation on this treatment prepared by Dr. Frank George. This presentation includes the advantages of IP therapy, case studies, and an outline of the 4-fold approach to IPT taken by the doctors at EuroMed Foundation. You may also visit our FAQ page for answers to commonly asked questions about IPT. Insulin Potentiation Therapy manages the delivery of glucose across cell membranes into the cells. Cancer cells have 10-20 times more hormone receptors on their surface than normal cells. When hormone is released into the bloodstream by the pancreas in response to a meal, the hormone attaches to these receptors on the surface of the cell and, like a key fitting into a lock, opens channels in the cell wall to allow nutrients to go into the cell. Because cancer cells have more of these receptors, they compete for food better than normal cells. In this way, cancer cells thrive and normal cells are compromised. To find out more about how the EuroMed Foundation uses IPT therapy as a cancer cure, request your free personal orientation online. One of our doctors will be happy to answer your basic questions in person or over the phone. You may have heard the expression, sugar feeds cancer. Indeed it does. Yet at the same time, sugar is the Achilles heel of cancer. PET scans for example find cancer by looking at the sugar uptake. The radioactive agent is mixed with sugar water and, because cancer cells take up much more sugar than normal cells, the radioactive agent congre Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) is one of the safest and most innovative approaches to treating cancer. IPT is an alternative cancer treatment that has almost none of the side effects such as nausea, radical hair loss, liver damage, and DNA distortion with standard chemotherapy, so it is appealing to patients who recognize the need for chemotherapy but want to do it in a safer, gentler manner. IPT embodies a potentially revolutionary concept in the medical management of a chronic degenerative disease. It has been hailed by those familiar with its precepts as the summum bonum of allopathic medicine.In its applications, physicians who use IPT feel that it offers a comparable level of clinical success compared to conventional full-dose chemotherapy, but typically without side effects such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hair loss, and immune suppression. Dr. Jonathan Stegall founder of the Center for Advanced Medicine, one of Cancer Tutor's verified clinics practices integrative oncology, which involves combining the best of modern medicine with natural therapies. The key to IPT as a cancer treatment lies in the off-label use of insulin, a hormone made by the body. Insulin is responsible for the delivery of glucose from the bloodstream, across cell membranes, and into the cells. Cancer cells have up to 20 times more insulin receptors on their surface than normal cells because cancer requires glucose for its energy production. When insulin is released into the bloodstream by the pancreas in response to a meal, the insulin attaches to these receptors on the surface of the cell and, like a key fitting into a lock, opens channels in the cell wall to allow nutrients to go into the cell. Because cancer cells have more of these insulin receptors, they outcompete the bodys norm Continue reading >>

Does It Work? / Insulin Potentiation Therapy / Dietary Approaches / Cam-cancer

Does It Work? / Insulin Potentiation Therapy / Dietary Approaches / Cam-cancer

IPT inventor Perez and his successors claimed that several cancer patients were successfully treated with IPT 1 ,3 , though case reports or clinical trials to substantiate these claims have never been published in peer-reviewed journals. More recently, two small clinical studies and four cases have been published in peer-reviewed journals. In a small uncontrolled study 4 , 16 patients with castration-resistant tumours were treated with insulin (0.4 units per kg body weight at 5-day intervals) in combination with goserelin depot (3.6 mg) and low-dose chemotherapy, i.e., eight patients with: cyclophosphamide (0.100.15 g/m2) + epirubicin (3 mg/m2) + vinblastine (0.5 mg/m2), and eight patients with docetaxel (3.6 mg/m2). Overall prostate-specific antigen (PSA) results after the sixth course of IPT showed partial effect in eight patients, stabilization in four patients, and disease progression in four patients; the median survival for all treated patients was 11.7 months. During the treatment no significant side effects were observed, and no lethal cases occurred. In a small prospective, controlled, randomized clinical trial 5 , IPT was tested in 30 women suffering from metastatic breast cancer resistant to 5-fluorouracil + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide and to hormone therapy with measurable lesions 4 . Patients were divided in three groups of ten: a group receiving only the anticancer drug methotrexate (2.5 mg/m2 every other day), a group receiving only insulin (0.3 units per kg body weight every other day), and a group receiving a combination of both. Drugs were given in two 3-week courses with a 1-week interval in-between. After 8 weeks, the sizes of the target tumours were measured and compared to the respective sizes before treatment. Progressive disease was less freq Continue reading >>

Ipt Potentiation Cancer Therapy (ipt) | Oasis Of Hope

Ipt Potentiation Cancer Therapy (ipt) | Oasis Of Hope

Also known as low dose chemotherapy , is one of the safest and most innovative approaches to treating cancer. It is a kinder, gentler way to fight cancer effectively, including particularly aggressive cancers such as lung cancer and colon cancer , but is also effective on a wide variety of cancer types. This alternative treatment has almost none of the side effects such as nausea, radical hair loss, liver damage, and DNA distortion that we see routinely with standard chemotherapy. The key to IPT as a cancer cure is the bodys own hormone IPT manages the delivery of glucose across cell membranes into the cells. Cancer cells have 10-20 times more IPT receptors on their surface than normal cells. When IPT is released into the bloodstream by the pancreas in response to a meal, the IPT attaches to these receptors on the surface of the cell and, like a key fitting into a lock, opens channels in the cell wall to allow nutrients to go into the cell. Because cancer cells have more of these receptors, they compete for food better than normal cells. In this way, cancer cells thrive and normal cells are compromised. You may have heard the expression, sugar feeds cancer. Indeed, it does. Yet at the same time, sugar is the Achilles heel of cancer. PET scans for example find cancer by looking at the sugar uptake. The radioactive agent is mixed with sugar water and, because cancer cells take up much more sugar than normal cells, the radioactive agent congregates in the cancer cells. The resulting picture will indicate enhanced uptake and a mass where the cancer is. We use that extreme need for sugar to our advantage with IPT when treating cancer. But instead of using a radioactive agent along with the sugar, we use chemotherapy. And we open the cellular membranes for significantly bett Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy

Insulin Potentiation Therapy

Icon indicating addition, or that the element can be opened. An arrow icon, usually indicating that the containing element can be opened and closed. Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) is an alternative cancer therapy that uses insulin to potentiate the effect of chemotherapy and other medications. This therapy was developed in Mexico by Dr. Donato Perez Garcia in the 1930s and has been used together with other unconventional therapies for many years (1) . Advocates of IPT believe that cancer cells consume more sugar than healthy cells and are therefore more sensitive to insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) (2) (7) . Insulin is also believed to increase the permeability of cell membranes, increasing the intracellular concentration and cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs (1) . According to the theory underlying this therapy, if cancer cells can be activated by exogenous insulin, a reduced dose (up to one-tenth the normal dose) of a chemotherapy drug can provide the same cytotoxic effects with less severe adverse reactions. No clinical trials have been performed to validate these claims. In addition, the pharmacokinetic profiles on concurrent use of insulin and chemotherapy drugs are lacking and it is unclear whether insulin also potentiates toxic effects of chemotherapy on healthy cells. Although proponents cite anecdotal case reports suggesting that IPT may be effective, there are no data comparing the efficacy of IPT to conventional chemotherapy. Most of the medications used in this therapy, such as insulin and other chemotherapy drugs, are FDA-approved but IPT clinics administer them off-label.Further, some clinics that administer IPT are not operated or staffed by oncologists. Side effects of IPT include hypoglycemic reaction. A systematic review of 21 studi Continue reading >>

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