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Chemrxpharmacy.com/search/ Q=insulin Glargine (lantus)

Chemrxpharmacy.com/search/ Q=insulin Glargine (lantus)

Chemrxpharmacy.Com/Search/ Q=Insulin Glargine (Lantus) Fewer trips to the pharmacy, Lantus (insulin glargine). Learn about Lantus (insulin glargine) Tramadol 25 Mg Amitriptyline SoloStar and vials. We are a licensed Canadian Pharmacy Online, com to get important updates and changes regarding the ordering, dispensing and shipping of insulin.. Search Drugs. Compare Lantus 100 u/ml prices from verified PharmacyChecker Policy on Buying Insulin from Canada is Stricter The pharmacy requires a prescription to fill. SEARCH DRUGS DRUGS BY ALPHABET Freedom Pharmacy: Lantus Optipen/Insulin Glargine / AVENTIS PHARMA:. Com/search/ Q=insulin Glargine (lantus) How To Use Lantus Insulin Glargine . Com/Search/ Q=Insulin Glargine (Lantus) Cash Converters. Learn about Lantus (insulin glargine) Cialis Pills India SoloStar and vials. Includes cost, dosage, prescribing information, side Effects, storage, saving card, and more Rx Search; Rx Conditions; Buy Naltrexone In The Uk Lantus Solostar Coupon & Discounts Save on Lantus There are not many known side effects from using insulin glargine or Lantus Chemrxpharmacy. I get the feeling Satsuki would get along fabulously with Kotomine Kirei. Browse all products. Lantus MDV (Insulin Glargine) Buy Lexapro Mastercard Please contact us for pricing and availability for this item. Drugs. Prescription Lantus Important Safety Information for Lantus (insulin glargine injection). Com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000. Order Lantus Insulin Glargine Injection 100 Units/mL to help cats control their diabetes mellitus. Com/Search/ Q=Insulin Glargine Chemrxpharmacy.Com/Search/ Q=Insulin Glargine (Lantus) (Lantus) Galeria de Fotos; Can You Get Elimite Cream Over The Counter; Gia Thuoc Cefadroxil Capsules Usp 500mg.. Chemrxpharma Continue reading >>

Insulin Storage|diabetesask A Pharmacist | Health Info | Walgreens

Insulin Storage|diabetesask A Pharmacist | Health Info | Walgreens

Insulin should never be stored near extreme heat or cold. Never store your insulin in your car in direct sunlight or in the glove compartment. Do not store insulin in the extreme cold of your freezer. Insulin should never be used past its expiration date. Always check the label for the date. Closely examine your insulin bottle for particles or discoloration, making sure it looks normal before your draw it into the syringe. If you see this, do not use it and return the unused bottle for an exchange and/or refund. Answers to questions regarding information about medications or health conditions arenot for diagnostic or treatment purposes and are not conclusive as to the presence orabsence of any health condition. Consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment ofyour medical condition. The information provided is not a substitute for medical advice.Advances in medicine may cause this information to become outdated, invalid orsubject to debate. Professional opinions and interpretations of the scientific literaturemay vary. Walgreens' terms of use and general warranty disclaimer apply to all servicesprovided. If you are in need of immediate medical attention, contact your physician,poison control center or emergency medical professional. If you need to speak with apharmacist for non-emergency matters, contact your local Walgreens pharmacist or calla Walgreens.com pharmacist toll-free at 1 (877) 250-5823. Continue reading >>

The Pharmacist's Guide To U-500 Insulin Tl;dr Pharmacy

The Pharmacist's Guide To U-500 Insulin Tl;dr Pharmacy

Family photograph of U-500 insulin (yellow) and U-100 (green) ( Image ) So.what is this dinosaur and why do we need it for managing diabetes?? Humulin R U-500 is a concentrated Regular insulin used as a basalinsulin. So instead of the typical U-100 insulin (100 units/ml), this beast is 500 units/ml5x as concentrated. In contrast, Humulin R U-100 insulin is considered a short-acting, prandialinsulin. Cant you already see the potential for mix-ups?! They're both regular insulins, but U-500 is used for basal coverage while U-100 is used for prandial coverage. Our use of concentrated insulin has increased over the past 10 years due to the high incidence of insulin resistance and obesity. The obesity rate in 2015 was 30% ! On top of this, the diabetes rate in 2015 was 9.4% (30.3 million people) and another 84 million have pre-diabetes. Insulin resistance is the hallmark characteristic for type 2 diabetes. As diabetes progresses and people with type 2 diabetes get older, insulin resistance continues to become problematic, resulting in higher insulin needs. When do you need to switch your patient to U-500 insulin? When a patient requires more than 200 units of insulin a day, moving to a concentrated insulin can improve BG control and provide more comfort with fewer injections. I'll get more into the "how to transition your patient to U-500" later in this post. Understanding the normal pancreas function helps to understand how to use injectable insulin safely and effectively. The pancreas has exocrine and endocrine functions. The exocrine functions basically help you digest food. This is the amylase and lipaseyou've heard about. These enzymes get secreted whenever you eat, and they help us break down dietary proteins and fats into something usable for the body. The endocrine f Continue reading >>

Soaring Insulin Prices Have Patients Terrified And Pharmacists Scrambling

Soaring Insulin Prices Have Patients Terrified And Pharmacists Scrambling

Soaring insulin prices have patients terrified and pharmacists scrambling Soaring insulin prices have patients terrified and pharmacists scrambling Current pricing and rebate system encourages high list prices The numbers are staggering. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 7.5 million Americans rely on insulinincluding 1.5 million with type 1 diabetesbut the average cost of insulin tripled between 2002 and 2013 and continues to surge. A June 2018 study by UpWell Health found that 45% of Americans with diabetes sometimes forgo care due to cost. Manufacturers offer coupons, but insured patients arent eligible for them, and busy pharmacies might not have time to seek them out. How can we control the insulin price crisis? The insulin supply chain is complex, and while it is unclear precisely how the dollars flow through the chain, it is clear the current pricing and rebate system encourages high list prices, said William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical, and mission officer at ADA. Unfortunately, people with diabetes are harmed with high list prices and high out-of-pocket costs. In May 2018, ADA released a white paper, Insulin Access and Affordability Working Group: Conclusions and Recommendations, the product of meetings with representatives of pharmaceutical manufacturers, wholesalers, PBMs, pharmacies, pharmacists, distributors, health plans, employers, and people with diabetes and their caregivers. The major finding was that additional transparency is needed throughout the supply chain to identify changes that will lead to long-term improvement in insulin affordability, Cefalu said. Meanwhile, insulin utilization has trended toward the higher-priced human analog insulins, although even the price of human insulins has increased. Still, the whit Continue reading >>

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

As anyone with diabetes can tell you, managing the disease with insulin usually means regular checkups at the doctor's office to fine-tune the dosage, monitor blood-sugar levels and check for complications. But here's a little known fact: Some forms of insulin can be bought without a prescription. Carmen Smith did that for six years when she didn't have health insurance and didn't have a primary care doctor. She bought her insulin without a prescription at Wal-Mart. "It's not like we go in our trench coat and a top hat, saying, 'Uh I need the insulin,' " says Smith, who lives in Cleveland. "The clerks usually don't know it's a big secret. They'll just go, 'Do we sell over-the-counter insulin?' " Once the pharmacist says yes, the clerk just goes to get it, Smith says. "And you purchase it and go about your business." But it's still a pretty uncommon purchase. Smith didn't learn from a doctor that she could buy insulin that way. In fact, many doctors don't know it's possible. When she no longer had insurance to help pay for doctors' appointments or medicine, Smith happened to ask at Wal-Mart if she could get vials of the medicine without a prescription. To figure out the dose, she just used the same amount a doctor had given her years before. It was a way to survive, she says, but no way to live. It was horrible when she didn't get the size of the dose or the timing quite right. "It's a quick high and then, it's a down," Smith says. "The down part is, you feel icky. You feel lifeless. You feel pain. And the cramps are so intense — till you can't walk, you can't sit, you can't stand." Smith says her guesswork put her in the emergency room a handful of times over the years. The availability of insulin over the counter presents a real conundrum. As Smith's experience shows Continue reading >>

Spiking Insulin Costs Put Patients In Brutal Bind

Spiking Insulin Costs Put Patients In Brutal Bind

Spiking Insulin Costs Put Patients in Brutal Bind July 25, 2018 -- Gabriella Corley was a normal, healthy little girl: cheerleader, basketball player, full of energy. Then, in 2014, her parents noticed some troubling symptoms: bed-wetting, frequent urination , insatiable thirst. A visit to the doctor turned into a trip to the emergency room when a test showed her blood sugar was perilously high. Doctors diagnosed the girl, now 11, with type 1 diabetes and gave her the first of what will be a lifetime of insulin shots to keep her alive. But the Corley family's ordeal was just beginning. Gabriella started getting welts at the injection site with brand-name insulin Humalog , then NovoLog , so doctors tried Apidra , which finally worked to control her blood sugar. Then came the bill: $250 a vial, because her insurer considered it a tier 3 drug, the mid-range of drug costs. Tier 3 typically includes brand name drugs for which there is no generic alternative Gabriella needed 1.5 vials a month. The expense was too much for her parents, both public school employees. They turned to the black market, a GoFundMe campaign, insulin -swapping Facebook groups, and whatever else they could afford to keep their daughter alive. "She doesn't have an option. Without insulin, she dies," says her mother, Andrea Corley, of Elkins, WV. "It's just a tough pill to swallow that an insurance company and pharmaceutical company can be making so much money over medically necessary medication." It's a dilemma facing people with diabetes and their families across the nation. Insulin prices have skyrocketed in recent years, on average tripling between 2002 and 2013. One popular brand, NovoLog, increased in list price by 353% from 2001 to 2016. Some, like the Corleys, raise the money however they can, w Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

The Risky Game One Doctor Plays To Help Patients Find Affordable Insulin05:37 Download X Copy The Code Below To Embed The Wbur Audio Player On Your Site Copy Embed Code

The Risky Game One Doctor Plays To Help Patients Find Affordable Insulin05:37 Download X Copy The Code Below To Embed The Wbur Audio Player On Your Site Copy Embed Code

In all, it takes three appointments with Dr. Hayward Zwerling, left, two trips to the pharmacy and several emails and phone calls to try to get Larry Rose affordable insulin. (Jesse Costa/WBUR) Sign up for the CommonHealth newsletter to receive a weekly digest of WBURs best health, medicine and science coverage. When Larry Rose filled his prescription for Lantus last year, and his copay came in at $400,he knew something had to change. Just three months earlier, a 90-day supply of the popular insulin brand had only cost him $15. Rose hurried in to see his doctor for what he hoped would be an affordable substitute. "And he said, 'Yep, I'm used to this. I can't get you a cost. We're going to have to play a game,' " Rose says, recounting the conversation. That game turned into an exercise in futility for Rose and his doctor, one many patients will relate to as the price of insulin and other drugs soar. Doctors write prescriptions. Patients take them to a pharmacy. Some leave without their medication when they learn the cost. Diabetes and other ailments left untreated get worse. Patients return to their doctor and the cycle starts again. "If I can't have the conversation, if I can't know the costs in real time, in the exam room, I'm at loss," says Rose's physician, Dr. Hayward Zwerling. "I can't make a final decision." When Rose arrived, looking for help, there were three or four brands of insulin-- long- and short-acting, in different doses and applicators-- that Zwerling could prescribe. "The problem was, I had no way of knowing which one was affordable," Zwerling says. There are several websites that list the cash prices for insulin and hundreds of other drugs. But most of Zwerling's patients have health insurance, and each health plan varies. When Zwerling meets with pa Continue reading >>

Practice Insights: Emerging Insulins

Practice Insights: Emerging Insulins

In 2016, APhA conducted a survey to explore pharmacists current diabetes management activities in community settings and assess pharmacists familiarity with emerging insulin products. This visually-enhanced, statistical report summarizes the findings obtained from interviews, discussion groups and survey results. The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) gratefully acknowledges the following individuals who served as content reviewers and pharmacy practice advisors: Campbell University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner Wilson Community Health Center This report and associated survey were supported by Sanofi as part of a collaboration with APhA. Sanofi provided comments; however, APhA retained full editorial control over the survey and final content. Diabetes is a prevalent and costly disease that is challenging to manage. There were approximately 29 million individuals in the United States with diabetes in 2014, and the annual costs of diabetes were estimated to be $245 billion in 2012.1,2 Diabetes is a complex and multifactorial disease that requires patients to take an active self-management role to prevent both acute and long-term complications. A large body of research has demonstrated that pharmacists delivery of patient care services can improve outcomes for patients with diabetes. A systematic review of 36 studies that evaluated the effectiveness of pharmacists interventions for improving outcomes found numerous beneficial effects. These effects included improvements in A1C, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, body mass index, and 10-year cardiovascular risk.3 Pharmacists also were found to significantly improve patients medication adherence and health-related quality of life. All studies that assessed financial outcomes fo Continue reading >>

Important Information For Pharmacists | V-go

Important Information For Pharmacists | V-go

For details about filling aV-Goprescription, download the Pharmacy Information Sheet . The number for each option refers to the amount of insulinV-Godelivers at a continuous preset basal rate during a 24-hour period. The amount of insulin available for on-demand bolus dosing withV-Gois the same (36 Units delivered in 2-Unit increments) for all three options. V-Gomust be filled completely with insulin to work properly. A separate prescription for a U-100 fast-acting insulin is required for use withV-Go(2 vials forV-Go20, 3 vials forV-Go30 andV-Go40). Patients StartingV-Go Require 2 Prescriptions When starting a patient onV-Go , 2 prescriptions are needed. Write 1 prescription forV-Goand another prescription for the U-100 fast-acting insulin. Two vials of insulin are required forV-Go 20, and 3 vials of insulin are required forV-Go30 andV-Go40. *A U-100 fast-acting insulin should be used withV-Go. Humalog(insulin lispro [rDNA origin] injection) and NovoLog(insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) have been tested by Valeritas, Inc. and found to be safe for use inV-Go.2 Be sure to click Humalogor NovoLog. Click unstructured and type in the Sig, Disp, and Pharmacy Notes manually. Humalogis a registered trademark of Eli Lilly and Company. NovoLogis a registered trademark of Novo Nordisk A/S. If regular adjustments or modifications to the basal rate of insulin are required in a 24-hour period, or if the amount of insulin used at meals requires adjustments of less than 2-Unit increments, use of the V-Go Wearable Insulin Delivery Device may result in hypoglycemia. The following conditions may occur during insulin therapy with V-Go: hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) or hyperglycemia (high blood glucose). Other adverse reactions associated with V-Go use include skin irritation from Continue reading >>

Ada White Paper Addresses Insulin Access, Affordability Jennifer Barrett, Associate Editor Publish Date: Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Ada White Paper Addresses Insulin Access, Affordability Jennifer Barrett, Associate Editor Publish Date: Tuesday, June 12, 2018

ADA White Paper Addresses Insulin Access, Affordability For millions of Americans living with diabetes, insulin affordability is a serious concern as list prices continue to surge. Current estimates show that diabetes is the most expensive chronic illness in the United States at a total of more than $327 billion per year, including $15 billion for insulin.1 The American Diabetes Association (ADA) convened an Insulin Access and Affordability Working Group to determine the full scope of the insulin affordability problem and provide recommendations on how to address the issue. The findings were published in Diabetes Care and presented by the ADAs Chief Scientific, Medical, and Mission Officer William T. Cefalu, MD, in testimony before the US Senate Special Committee on Aging.2 According to the data, the average US list price of the 4 insulin categories increased by 15% to 17% per year from 2012 to 2016. The price that pharmacies paid for insulin increased at similar rates over the same period. Additionally, between 2006 and 2013, average out-of-pocket costs per insulin user among Medicare Part D enrollees increased by 19% per year for all insulin types.1 The Working Group interviewed more than 20 stakeholders who were representatives of pharmaceutical manufacturers, wholesalers, pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), pharmacies, pharmacists, distributors, health plans, and employers, as well as people with diabetes and their caregivers. Based on their findings, the Working Group determined that there is a consistent lack of transparency throughout the insulin supply chain, with many stakeholders reporting that more transparency is needed. The Working Group found that although insulin manufacturers still control the list price of the products, substantial market power has shift Continue reading >>

Advocate Counters The Fake News About Buying Insulin Online

Advocate Counters The Fake News About Buying Insulin Online

Advocate Counters the Fake News About Buying Insulin Online Gabriel Levitt of PharmacyChecker.com talks to IN about the online marketplace for insulin. We recently surveyed Insulin Nation readers about what they have done to obtain insulin and make it last. Many readers indicated that they have purchased insulin online, leading us to wonder about the existing online marketplace for insulin and other prescription drugs. How exactly does it work? Is it legal? Is it safe? The online marketplace can be used responsibly, according to one advocate. Gabriel Levitt is a co-founder of PharmacyChecker.com, an independent company that verifies U.S. and international online pharmacies and compares drug prices. According to Levitt, public opinion about the online marketplace is shaped by a lot of false information coming from the pharmaceutical industry, and its time to set the record straight. He offered these facts about the online marketplace: 1. Its not uncommon to buy drugs online. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4-5 million Americans per year import drugs for personal use due to cost. While there are no hard statistics on the number of patients purchasing insulin specifically, Levitt says the marketplace for insulin is active. 2. There is price transparency for insulin and other drugs. We are in the midst of a drug affordability crisis, and Americans need all the help and options they can get, says Levitt. At present, his organization has verified two Canadian pharmacies that sell insulin, and users can compare prices at each pharmacy. 3. Verified online pharmacies follow industry standards. PharmacyChecker.com has general standards of practice for online pharmacies, as well as a strict policy on temperature sensitive products, such as insulin. Fo Continue reading >>

Pharmacy Resource Kit | Soliqua 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

Pharmacy Resource Kit | Soliqua 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

for SOLIQUA 100/33 (insulin glargine and lixisenatide injection) 100Units/mL and 33 mcg/mL In patients with known hypersensitivity to the active substance(s) or to any of the product components. Anaphylaxis and Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions: In clinical trials of lixisenatide, there have been cases of anaphylaxis and other serious hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema. Severe, life-threatening, generalized allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can occur with insulins, including insulin glargine. If hypersensitivity reactions occur, discontinue SOLIQUA100/33. Use caution in patients with a history of anaphylaxis or angioedema with another GLP-1 RA because it is unknown whether such patients will be predisposed to anaphylaxis. Pancreatitis: Acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis, has been observed in patients treated with GLP-1 RAs. Cases of pancreatitis were reported in clinical trials of lixisenatide. After initiation of SOLIQUA100/33, observe patients for signs and symptoms of pancreatitis (e.g., persistent severe abdominal pain, sometimes radiating to the back and which may be accompanied by vomiting). If pancreatitis is suspected, SOLIQUA100/33 should promptly be discontinued. If pancreatitis is confirmed, restarting SOLIQUA100/33 is not recommended and other antidiabetic therapies should be considered. Never Share a SOLIQUA100/33 SoloStar Pen between Patients: Pen-sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens, even if the needle is changed. Do not withdraw SOLIQUA100/33 from the pen with a syringe. Hyperglycemia or Hypoglycemia with Changes in Insulin Regimen: Changes in SOLIQUA100/33 regimen may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglyce Continue reading >>

Insulin Prices, Availability And Affordability: A Cross-sectional Survey Of Pharmacies In Hubei Province, China

Insulin Prices, Availability And Affordability: A Cross-sectional Survey Of Pharmacies In Hubei Province, China

Insulin prices, availability and affordability: a cross-sectional survey of pharmacies in Hubei Province, China 1 Chaojie Liu ,2 Margaret Ewen ,3 Zinan Zhang ,1 and Guoqin Liu 4 1School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province China 1School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province China 1School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province China 1School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province China 2China Health Program, La Trobe University, Plenty Road & Kingsbury Drive, Melbourne, VIC 3086 Australia 3Health Action International, Overtoom 60-2hg, Amsterdam, 1054 HK The Netherlands 4School of Management, Zunyi Medical University, No.201 Dalian Road, Zunyi, Guizhou Province China Received 2017 Feb 10; Accepted 2017 Aug 16. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Poor access to affordable insulin results in serious and needless complications and premature deaths for those with diabetes who need this essential medici Continue reading >>

Should Ky. Lawmakers Let Pharmacists Dispense Emergency Insulin?

Should Ky. Lawmakers Let Pharmacists Dispense Emergency Insulin?

Last month, 22-year-old Sam Klein opened up her fridge and made a startling discovery: her last vial of insulin was shattered. Klein has Type 1 diabetes, which means without insulin she could die. In many states, pharmacists are allowed to dispense 30-days or the smallest unit available of a life-saving drug in an emergency situation. But in Kentucky, thats not an option for people like Klein. So when Klein called her mom, Sarah Ferguson, she went into panic mode. I was getting into that frantic mom emergency-mode of thinking running through the list of things that I could possibly do to get her insulin for the weekend because her doctors office was closed and she didnt have a refill on a prescription, Ferguson said. Klein was due for a doctors appointment and a refill the following week, but the doctor didnt return a call to the emergency line. At that point, one of Kleins only options was an expensive emergency room visit to get a new prescription. But Ferguson put out a call for insulin on Facebook and eventually found her daughter a vial from a neighbor. She just went right to her refrigerator and pulled out of vial and said we can have it I thought I was just going to burst into tears, Ferguson said. One of the reasons Ferguson was so upset was that she knew someone like her daughter did die because of a similar situation. In 2015, Kevin Houdeshell s insulin prescription expired, and his doctor didnt return calls from a pharmacist for refills. He went without the drug, and died four days later because of diabetes-related complications. Houdeshells death pushed lawmakers in Ohio to act, and the resulting legislation was named after Houdeshell. Rather than allowing the patient to leave the pharmacy without their medications, [pharmacists] basically use the provision Continue reading >>

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