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Insulin Inhaler Price

Welcome Afrezza – Inhaled Insulin Gets Real!

Welcome Afrezza – Inhaled Insulin Gets Real!

Take a deep breath, Friends: the world’s first (seemingly) commercially viable inhalable insulin product is here. Today, Sanofi has officially launched MannKind’s long-awaited Afrezza, and we hear the product is already appearing in some pharmacies nationwide. Housed in a tiny, handy inhaler device, Afrezza is said to bring not only convenience, but also some new medical benefits to the world of rapid-acting insulin. “I don’t know if it’s gonna be a blockbuster, but I do think it’s gonna have a niche,” says Dr. Steve Edelman of UC San Diego and TCOYD (a type 1 himself), who was one of the lead investigators on Afrezza clinical trials. “I can say it has been shown in clinical trials to reduce hypoglycemia, but FDA won’t let (Sanofi) put that in the labeling. I was at the FDA public hearing in Washington, DC, and they spent all the time trying to refute the data instead of trying to understand it… It’s just a total shame FDA didn’t allow them to put that benefit in the label.” “Afrezza really does work extremely well. I can see myself taking it for incidental hypers where subcutaneous insulin is way too slow and stays around in your system way too long,” he adds. Whoa… aside from the obviously enormously superior design of the inhaler device itself over the previous Exubera fiasco, we’ve been skeptical about the practicality of Afrezza. After all, it’s just for prandial dosing, so even most type 2s would need a shot a day of long-acting insulin to complete their therapy, right? And how precise can inhaled dosing possibly be? Plus, it’s hard to get your head around how this stuff reduces hypoglycemia. Last not least, there are the issues of pricing and insurance reimbursement. Read on… and please don’t miss the product Q&A at the e Continue reading >>

Inhaled Insulin

Inhaled Insulin

Researchers, doctors, and people with diabetes agree that injected insulin works well to manage the disease. They'll probably also say that getting insulin into your body through something other than a needle would be even better. You can't get insulin in a pill, but how about breathing it in? The idea of inhaling insulin has been around for decades. It wasn't until the 1990s that researchers made it possible. With an inhaler much like the ones people with asthma use, you breathe a fine insulin powder into your lungs. There, it enters your blood through tiny blood vessels. In June 2014, the FDA approved Afrezza. It's an inhaler with pre-measured, rapid-acting insulin you use before meals. It's not for diabetes emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Common side effects of inhaled insulin are low blood sugar, a cough, and a scratchy or sore throat. If you have type 1 diabetes, you'll still need to take long-acting insulin, too, to help control your blood sugar. If you smoke or you have a lung disease, such as asthma or COPD, you shouldn't use inhaled insulin. The FDA approved the first inhaled insulin, Exubera, in September 2006. People who had type 1 or type 2 diabetes could use it. But the drug's maker took it off the market in October 2007, because it didn't seem to catch on with patients. People thought the inhaler was too big and clunky. (The Afrezza inhaler is much smaller.) Later, the FDA was concerned that Exubera might cause lung problems including cancer. Continue reading >>

Insulin Inhalation Powder (exubera) For Diabetes Mellitus

Insulin Inhalation Powder (exubera) For Diabetes Mellitus

SAFETY As with the use of other insulins, hypoglycemia is the primary safety concern with inhaled insulin. When used in combination with ultralente insulin, there was no clinically important difference in total or severe episodes of hypoglycemia per month compared with a combination of injected neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin and regular insulin.2–4 However, as with injected insulin, hypoglycemia is much more likely to occur in patients using inhaled insulin plus oral agents compared with patients using oral agents alone (4.6 versus 0.1 episodes over three months).5 In rare instances, inhaled insulin can cause decreases in pulmonary function, which may be reversible upon discontinuation.1 Because absorption is variable, it should not be used in patients who smoke or those with lung disease (e.g., asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).1 Inhaled insulin is U.S. Food and Drug Administration pregnancy category C.1 TOLERABILITY Cough, nonspecific chest pain, dyspnea, and dry mouth occur in less than 5 percent of patients started on inhaled insulin; however, few persons will discontinue treatment as a result.1 Patients receiving inhaled insulin generally prefer this route of administration compared with subcutaneous administration.6 In clinical trials, weight gain in patients using inhaled insulin was similar to weight gain in patients using subcutaneous insulin.1,2,4 EFFECTIVENESS The onset of action is similar to that of rapid-acting subcutaneous insulin analogues, but the duration of action, which is similar to that of regular insulin, is longer.1 Inhaled insulin has been compared with subcutaneous regular insulin in combination with a long-acting or intermediate-acting insulin in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. These effectiveness studies rang Continue reading >>

The Return Of Inhaled Insulin

The Return Of Inhaled Insulin

Darrell Hulisz, RPh, PhamD Associate Professor, CWRU, School of Medicine Doctor of Pharmacy Candidate, ONU College of Pharmacy Inhaled insulin first made an appearance on the US market in 2011. The design of the metered dose device was cumbersome and lacked portability, was withdrawn by the manufacturer, Pfizer, with about a year. Recently, Sanofi began marketing a new inhaled insulin known as Afrezza®. The product has received FDA approval in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Afrezza® is a human insulin product that is rapidly absorbed upon inhalation. Patients place a pre-filled cartridge containing either 4, 8, or 12 units of insulin into an inhaler. Patients exhale fully, then inhale sharply and hold their breath for as long as comfortable to get the medication absorbed. This creates a rapid absorption and a decreased duration of insulin action that more closely resembles endogenous prandial insulin release. The pharmacokinetic profile more closely resembles ultra-short acting insulin, such as insulin lispro or aspart. In clinical trials for Type 1 diabetes, Afrezza® was found to be non-inferior to insulin when comparing patients' mean drop in HgbA1C. However, one trial found that patients taking injectable insulin were more likely to achieve a HgbA1C below 7% at the end of the 24 week trial period. In Type 2 diabetes, Afrezza® was studied to determine its viability as an add-on therapy in addition to oral diabetes medications. The clinical trial examined Afrezza® in combination with oral medication compared to oral medication alone. The group taking Afrezza® had greater diabetes control at the end of the trial period. While this is not a surprising finding, it does confirm its potential use as an add-on therapy for uncontrolled Type 2 diabetics. The side effec Continue reading >>

9 Things We Learned About Afrezzas Future

9 Things We Learned About Afrezzas Future

9 Things We Learned About Afrezzas Future Mannkind officials discuss the future of their inhaled insulin during an earnings call. It was supposed to be a great marriage of a new product and deep pockets. In 2014, the pharmaceutical giant Sanofi agreed to market Afrezza, an inhalable insulin created by Mannkind Corporation. It didnt work out that way. In the beginning of 2016, the two companies parted ways after a disappointing rollout and terrible Afrezza sales. Following the demise of the Sanofi-Mannkind agreement, speculation swirled about MannKinds commercial future and Sanofis motivations. On a April 26 conference call for investors and analysts, Mannkind officials laid out plans to directly market Afrezza, concentrating on three steps: -putting performance and prescribing information in the hands of diabetes care professionals -working to gain better acceptance of the drug by payors and insurance companies -backing away from the premium pricing set at the drugs commercial launch -Cooperation with independent medical practices in the opening of specialized diabetes care centers The drug appears to have a loyal user following, judging from posts to diabetes care blogs and message boards that positive chatter from users has been padded somewhat by investors who back Mannkind. Some users, though, have reported bronchial irritation and coughing after use. Label warnings and precautions include recommendations against use by persons who smoke or have impaired respiratory function. The prescribing information recommends periodic lung capacity and function testing. In the U.S., where Afrezza was first cleared for commercial distribution, the Food and Drug Administration maintains strict control over parties authorized to move pharmaceutical products through the regulatory Continue reading >>

The Ins And Outs Of Afrezza®, The Only Inhaled Insulin

The Ins And Outs Of Afrezza®, The Only Inhaled Insulin

AFREZZA is a man-made rapid-acting inhaled insulin breathed in through your lungs and is used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes. AFREZZA is available by prescription only. AFREZZA is not for use in place of long-acting insulin. AFREZZA must be used with long-acting insulin in people who have type 1 diabetes. AFREZZA is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. It is not known if AFREZZA is safe and effective for use in people who smoke. AFREZZA is not for use in people who smoke or have recently stopped smoking (less than 6 months). It is not known if AFREZZA is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age. What is the most important information I should know about AFREZZA? AFREZZA can cause serious side effects including: Sudden lung problems (bronchospasms). Do not use AFREZZA if you have long-term (chronic) lung problems such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Before starting AFREZZA, your healthcare provider will perform a detailed medical history, physical examination, and will give you a breathing test (called spirometry) to check how your lungs are working. Who should not use AFREZZA? Do not use AFREZZA: During episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). If you have chronic lung problems such as asthma or COPD. If you are allergic to regular human insulin or any of the ingredients of AFREZZA as this may cause a significant and severe allergic reaction. What should I tell my healthcare provider before using AFREZZA? Before using AFREZZA, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you: Have lung problems such as asthma or COPD. Have or have had lung cancer. Are using any inhaled medications. Smoke or have recently stopped smoking. Have kidney or liver problems. Are pregnant, plan Continue reading >>

Sanofi Insulin Buy Back And Rival Price Hikes A Boon For Mannkind's Afrezza

Sanofi Insulin Buy Back And Rival Price Hikes A Boon For Mannkind's Afrezza

Related tags: Inhalable insulin , Mannkind corporation Despite requiring more API, the price of inhaled insulin Afrezza has dropped below that of injected rapid-acting rivals says MannKind's CEO, reporting a resilient Q3. For the third quarter 2016, MannKind Corporation reported total sales of $162m, reflecting the recognition of several previously deferred amounts including a $150m upfront payment - related to the firms Afrezza commercialisation collaboration with Sanofi which terminated in January . This has played a part in positioning MannKind in its best financial health since Sanofi abandoned the deal, and according to CEO Matthew Pfeffer the firm can now concentrate on growing Afrezza sales which have been historically disappointing . Third quarter sales of Mannkind-branded Afrezza launched in July stood at $600,000. Two-and-a-half insulin units per Afrezza cartridge Afrezza became the only inhaled rapid-action insulin available in the US when it was launched in February 2015 . But the price of the product, due in part to its manufacturing costs, contributed to a low uptake. The product is based on MannKinds Technosphere platform, comprising of the excipient fumaryl diketopiperazine (FDKP), water and the non-ionic surfactant polysorbate 80 which are mixed and crystallised into uniform particles of 2 microns in diameter in combination with recombinant human insulin. Inhaled medications tend to be somewhat less efficient than injected medications, as you have some loss of powder. Only the powder that makes it into the deep lung is taken into the bloodstream, to the effect that some is left in the throat, it is swallowed and digested, having no effect. Pfeffer told in-Pharmatechnologist.com. Injected insulin has some loss in the syringe, etc., but this is much less Continue reading >>

Inhaled Insulin: A “puff” Than A “shot” Before Meals

Inhaled Insulin: A “puff” Than A “shot” Before Meals

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes is one of the greatest challenges in medical field affecting 347 million people worldwide. It is projected to be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030 and >80% deaths due to diabetes occur in low- and middle-income countries.[1] Diabetes mellitus (DM) is described by WHO as a metabolic disorder of multiple etiology, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia with disturbances of carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action or both; the effects of which include long-term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs.[2] The goals of therapy for diabetes are to alleviate the symptoms related to hyperglycemia and to prevent or reduce the acute and chronic complications of diabetes. Insulin is the mainstay for treatment of virtually all type 1 and many type 2 diabetes patients though there is a long list of glucose-lowering agents like sulphonylureas, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, glucagon-like peptide analogs, dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors, amylin analogues, alpha glucosidase inhibitors etc.[3] Insulin is regarded as the first choice in case of type 2 DM, particularly in thin individuals or those with severe weight loss, in individuals with underlying renal or hepatic disease that precludes oral glucose-lowering agents, or in hospitalized or acutely ill individuals. Insulin therapy is ultimately required by almost all individuals with type 2 DM because of the progressive nature of the disorder and the relative insulin deficiency that develops in patients with long-standing diabetes.[4] Insulin may be administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or subcutaneously. The major drawback of currently available formulations of insulin is that they have to be injected and moreover fai Continue reading >>

Afrezza Prices And Afrezza Coupons - Goodrx

Afrezza Prices And Afrezza Coupons - Goodrx

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Ultra Rapid-acting Inhaled Insulin Afrezza Now Available In Us Pharmacies Nationwide

Ultra Rapid-acting Inhaled Insulin Afrezza Now Available In Us Pharmacies Nationwide

Twitter Summary: Sanofi + MannKind Afrezza now available in some US pharmacies; prices comparable to Novolog/Humalog, @afrezzauser gives patient perspective! Update (2/3/15): Today, Sanofi and MannKind announced the official launch of the ultra rapid-acting inhaled-insulin Afrezza. The insulin is now available at pharmacies nationwide. The diaTribe team got an exclusive call with Sanofi executives (Andrew Purcell, Vice President and Head of Sanofi’s US Diabetes Business Unit and Stefan Schwarz, Sanofi’s Head of US Marketing for Afrezza) to discuss the details of the launch and plans moving forward. Below are a few key pieces of information in regards to this official launch: The Afrezza “Patient Savings Card” indicates that “depending on your insurance coverage,” the first prescription of Afrezza will cost $0, followed by no more than $30 for each additional refill (each refill supplies two inhalers and a month’s supply of cartridges). We are curious what insurance plans will qualify for this savings plan, but as of now details about Afrezza’s insurance coverage are not available. We have heard anecdotally that Humana insurance will likely make a decision about covering Afrezza within 3-6 months. Before receiving a prescription for Afrezza, patients will be required to undergo a breathing test (“spirometry”) to verify their lung health (Afrezza is not approved for people with chronic lung disease, including asthma and COPD). Afrezza is also not recommended in patients who smoke or who have recently stopped smoking. Spirometry is a simple and common examination used to measure how much air the lungs can inhale and exhale, as well as how fast they can exhale. From our understanding, primary care physicians (PCPs) may be more familiar with spirometry te Continue reading >>

Sanofi Ends Marketing Deal With Developer Of Inhaled Insulin

Sanofi Ends Marketing Deal With Developer Of Inhaled Insulin

An inhaled insulin championed by a billionaire medical entrepreneur suffered a big setback on Tuesday when it was abandoned by the company with the rights to market it. MannKind, the developer of the insulin, announced on Tuesday that Sanofi, the big French drug company with the marketing rights, was terminating the agreement between the two companies. The move by Sanofi was not a surprise since the inhaled insulin, called Afrezza, has had dismal sales since being approved by the Food and Drug Administration in June 2014. Sanofi reported sales of only 5 million euros, or a little more than $5 million, in the first nine months of 2015. MannKind’s shares plummeted 48 percent on Tuesday, closing at 75 cents. When Afrezza was approved, the shares were worth about $10. The company, based in Valencia, Calif., is expected to face significant money problems without Sanofi’s support, though it vowed to fight on. “I speak today with resolve to say that this is not the end of the line for Afrezza, or MannKind, by any means,” Matthew J. Pfeffer, the chief financial officer of MannKind, said in a brief conference call with investors and analysts, during which the company took no questions. MannKind was started by Alfred E. Mann, who made a fortune founding aerospace and medical device companies, including the insulin pump manufacturer MiniMed, which was sold to Medtronic for about $3 billion. But Mr. Mann, now 90, spent much of his accumulated wealth backing MannKind as it suffered many setbacks before finally winning F.D.A. approval of Afrezza. Mr. Mann and other supporters of Afrezza said the product would provide millions of diabetics with a new option that might be more attractive to them than injecting themselves with insulin up to several times a day. This would improv Continue reading >>

Insulin Inhalers

Insulin Inhalers

Tweet The use of insulin inhalers means that oral insulin is a viable treatment for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Whilst previous attempts to create insulin inhalers have failed, lessons have been learned and modern inhaled insulin is once again an exciting area of diabetes technology. Which insulin inhalers are available? Currently, inhaled insulin is not readily available on the NHS. However, this situation could change as early as the end of 2014 or in 2015 if a new form of inhaled insulin is approved for use by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). The latest form of inhaled insulin to be approved in the United States is Afrezza. The insulin was developed by Mannkind Corp. and is now being marketed by the French pharmaceutical firm Sanofi. Insulin inhaler functionality Some insulin inhalers convert a dose of dry insulin using compressed air, providing particles which may then be inhaled. This process is called aerosolization. Other insulin inhalers are activated with the breath. The insulin dose, in powdered form, is inhaled directly through the mouth into the lungs. Ultra-rapid acting insulin The fact that inhaled insulin is breathed into the lungs means that insulin doses, taken by inhaler, can enter the bloodstream quicker than injected insulin. Whilst rapid acting insulin injections typically have their peak activity between 30 and 90 minutes after injecting, the newest form of inhaled insulin, Afrezza, has its peak activity between 12 and 15 minutes after taking the dose. In the future slow acting (basal) insulin may also be able to be inhaled, but there are no indications that inhaled basal insulin will be available within the next few years. For this reason, people needing to take long acting insulin will continue to need t Continue reading >>

Fast-acting Afrezza Is Designed To Help You Control Mealtime Blood Sugar Spikes And Lower A1c

Fast-acting Afrezza Is Designed To Help You Control Mealtime Blood Sugar Spikes And Lower A1c

AFREZZA is a man-made rapid-acting inhaled insulin breathed in through your lungs and is used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes. AFREZZA is available by prescription only. AFREZZA is not for use in place of long-acting insulin. AFREZZA must be used with long-acting insulin in people who have type 1 diabetes. AFREZZA is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. It is not known if AFREZZA is safe and effective for use in people who smoke. AFREZZA is not for use in people who smoke or have recently stopped smoking (less than 6 months). It is not known if AFREZZA is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age. What is the most important information I should know about AFREZZA? AFREZZA can cause serious side effects including: Sudden lung problems (bronchospasms). Do not use AFREZZA if you have long-term (chronic) lung problems such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Before starting AFREZZA, your healthcare provider will perform a detailed medical history, physical examination, and will give you a breathing test (called spirometry) to check how your lungs are working. Who should not use AFREZZA? Do not use AFREZZA: During episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). If you have chronic lung problems such as asthma or COPD. If you are allergic to regular human insulin or any of the ingredients of AFREZZA as this may cause a significant and severe allergic reaction. What should I tell my healthcare provider before using AFREZZA? Before using AFREZZA, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you: Have lung problems such as asthma or COPD. Have or have had lung cancer. Are using any inhaled medications. Smoke or have recently stopped smoking. Have kidney or liver problems. Are pregnant, plan Continue reading >>

New Promotions For Inhaled Insulin Afrezza - February 2017

New Promotions For Inhaled Insulin Afrezza - February 2017

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. We're closely following the latest developments with Afrezza, the inhaled insulin that's now been on the market for a little over two years, and has been struggling to gain traction since Sanofi dropped its marketing deal with manufacturers MannKind Corp. last year. We at the 'Mine have used Afrezza personally with positive results, and we know there's a keen interest among at least a small but vocal group in the D-Community online. It's been a bit unnerving to see a slew of business headlines and investor updates predicting an end to California-based MannKind Corp. -- especially lately, with talk of complicated "reverse stock splitting" supposedly aimed at boosting the value of stock prices that have been circling the drain for a while now. We Afrezza users are left wondering how long this medication may yet be available. So our interest was piqued -- to say the least -- when a MannKind exec recently told us: "We think there's an opportunity to be the Uber of diabetes." It's true. MannKind itself doesn't seem to be worried -- at least not publicly -- and in fact the company's Chief Commercial Officer Mike Castagna tells us they're ramping up their next phase of promotion, based on: New Triple-Variety Packs: In the coming weeks, MannKind will launch a new titration package that has all three dosing amounts inside -- 60 of each the 4, 8, and 12-unit cartridges. Sales Reps and Educators: They're bringing more players to the table to start selling and helping patients using Afrezza. TV Presence: We're told the company plans to produce TV commercials, and may even support a new diabetes reality TV show. The 'Uber of Diabete Continue reading >>

Inhalable Insulin: A Losing Battle?

Inhalable Insulin: A Losing Battle?

Diabetes is on the rise. In the UK, the number of sufferers is now estimated at over four million, and the figure is expected to surpass five million by 2025. Across the Atlantic, more than 29 million people have diabetes – a staggering 9.3% of the American population. A further 86 million have prediabetes, placing them at heightened risk of becoming ill. For many sufferers, especially those with type 1 diabetes, regular insulin injections are a lifeline. On top of lifestyle measures and other medications, they may need to use their syringe or autoinjector as many as four times a day. Injections, however, are far from the most comfortable or convenient route of administration. For a number of years, the pharmaceutical community has been on a quest for alternatives, with many pondering whether insulin could be inhaled instead. History repeats In 2006, the world’s first inhalable insulin, Pfizer’s Exubera, was released to great fanfare. Forecast to draw in $2bn a year in sales, the drug was expected to revolutionise the diabetes treatment landscape. Unfortunately, in the face of mounting safety concerns, Exubera was pulled. As the hype died down, a number of similar products in development were quietly shelved. It wasn’t until February 2015, with the release of Sanofi’s Afrezza, that the potential seemed to rise again. Developed by MannKind, this drug-device combination product comprises a dry formulation of insulin delivered through a small portable inhaler, and was also valued at around $2bn (around a tenth of the total global insulin market). It was intended to meet "a recognised need for an insulin that doesn’t require an injection". So when, in January 2016, Sanofi announced it would pull the plug on Afrezza, history appeared to repeat itself in the most Continue reading >>

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