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Insulin Glargine Chemical Structure

Insulin Analogs: What Are The Clinical Implications Of Structural Differences?

Insulin Analogs: What Are The Clinical Implications Of Structural Differences?

US Pharm. 2010;35(5)(Diabetes suppl):3-7. In healthy adults, basal insulin concentrations of 5 to 15 µU/mL help to maintain fasting plasma glucose concentrations (FIGURE 1).1 Immediately following a meal, insulin concentration peaks at 60 to 80 µU/mL, returning to basal levels 1 to 3 hours later. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, progressive loss of beta cells results in the disruption of endogenous insulin secretion, in turn leading to requirement for insulin therapy. Considering that the daily pattern of normal insulin secretion is complex, close replication of this pattern is needed to address both fasting and prandial glucose control. In human insulin preparations, such as regular human insulin (RHI), insulin molecules typically self-aggregate to form dimers, which in turn stabilize around zinc ions to form hexamers.2 Following injection, the subcutaneous insulin depot is diluted by the interstitial fluid, causing hexamers to break down into dimers and biologically active monomers. The dissociation of hexamers into dimers and monomers is a rate-limiting step in absorption for all insulins and contributes to the delay in the effect of RHI. Because insulin hexamers are too bulky to be transported across the vascular endothelium, there is a 30- to 60-minute lag phase between injection and onset of action, which requires careful dose administration and food consumption. In addition to slow onset, a slow clearance can result in prolonged periods of elevated insulin and “delayed” hypoglycemia. Exogenous basal insulin delivery has traditionally involved single or twice-daily injections of neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin, which is a formulation of protamine insulin in a zinc suspension. Protamine prolongs the absorption of NPH insulin, causing an intermediate dura Continue reading >>

Long Acting Insulin Glargine Injections

Long Acting Insulin Glargine Injections

Insulin Glargine should be shot through subcutaneous injection.You should not shot it through intravenous injection,or it may cause badly glycopenia. If there is no clinical differences in the level of serum insulin or the glucose after the subcutaneous injection to the abdomendeltoid or thigh.You should take turns of your injection area. According to the patients situation,one should use it under the doctors guidance. Patients who are hypoglycemic or allergic to the insulin glargine. The insulin glargine should be stored in the refrigerator at the temperature of 2 to 8 degrees.Its better be used up in 30 days.Avoid light and heat. Corporate name:Liaoning Boao Biological Pharmaceutical Co.,ltd Address:Shennong Street No.55,Economic Technological Development District,Benxi,Liaoning,China LiaoNing BoAo Biological Pharmaceutical Co.,Ltd founded in 2010.We keep on drawing advanced experience from both domestic and overseas after 6 years,we make independent innovation and Develop three kinds of insulin APIs and injections.Now is the leading enterprise in Liaoning Province. We are one of the leading China manufacturers and suppliers of long acting insulin glargine injections. Should you're interested in it, welcome to buy or wholesale the quality and cheap products made in China from our factory. We have many products in stock and the low price, free sample and the customized service are available. Continue reading >>

Drug: Insulin Glargine

Drug: Insulin Glargine

Brite Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] A ALIMENTARY TRACT AND METABOLISM A10 DRUGS USED IN DIABETES A10A INSULINS AND ANALOGUES A10AE Insulins and analogues for injection, long-acting A10AE04 Insulin glargine D03250 Insulin glargine (USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Blood Glucose Regulators Insulins Insulin glargine D03250 Insulin glargine (USAN/INN) Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 2 Agents affecting individual organs 24 Hormones 249 Miscellaneous 2492 Pancreatic hormones D03250 Insulin glargine (USAN/INN); Insulin glargine (genetical recombination) (JP17); Insulin glargine (genetical recombination) injection (JP17); Insulin glargine (genetical recombination [Insulin glargin biosimilar 1] (JAN); Insulin glargine (genetical recombination) [Insulin glargin biosimilar 2] (JAN) Target-based classification of drugs [BR:br08310] Cytokine receptors Receptor tyrosine kinase RTK class II (Insulin receptor family) insulin receptor Insulin glargine D03250 Insulin glargine (USAN/INN) Cytochrome P450 interactions [BR:br08309] CYP inducers CYP1A2 Insulin glargine D03250 Insulin glargine (USAN/INN) Drugs listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia [BR:br08311] Chemicals D03250 Insulin glargine (genetical recombination) D03250 Insulin glargine (genetical recombination) injection Antidiabetics [br08361.html] D03250 New drug approvals in the USA [br08319.html] New Molecular Entity and New Therapeutic Biological Product Approvals D03250 New drug approvals in Europe [br08329.html] European public assessment reports (EPAR) authorised medicine D03250 New drug approvals in Japan [br08318.html] Drugs with new active ingredients D03250 New drug approvals in the USA, Europe and Japan [br08328.html] Approval dates by FDA, EMA and PMDA D0 Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Monograph For Professionals - Drugs.com

Insulin Glargine Monograph For Professionals - Drugs.com

FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients that it is aware of four recently-published observational studies that looked at the use of insulin glargine (Lantus) and possible risk for cancer in patients with diabetes. Three of the four studies suggest an increased risk for cancer associated with use of insulin glargine. Based on the currently available data, the FDA recommends that patients should not stop taking their insulin therapy without consulting a physician, since uncontrolled blood sugar levels can have both immediate and long-term serious adverse effects. FDA is currently reviewing many sources of safety data for insulin glargine, including these newly published observational studies, data from all completed controlled clinical trials, and information about ongoing controlled clinical trials, to better understand the risk, if any, for cancer associated with use of insulin glargine. Discussions are also ongoing between FDA and the manufacturer of insulin glargine as to whether any additional studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of this drug will need to be performed. FDA will communicate the results on its ongoing review to the public, as appropriate, as our review continues. The FDA encourages both healthcare professionals and patients to report side effects from the use of insulin glargine to the FDAs MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program. For more information visit the FDA website at: and . Long-acting human insulin analog;1 prepared using recombinant DNA technology and special laboratory strain of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (K12).1 2 3 Always Hungry? You Just Might Have One Of These Conditions Pending revision, the material in this section should be considered in light of more recently available information in the MedWatch notification Continue reading >>

The Amino Acid Structure Of Rapid-acting Insulin Analogues. The Molecular Modifications On The Insulin Molecule Are Shown. | Research Diagram

The Amino Acid Structure Of Rapid-acting Insulin Analogues. The Molecular Modifications On The Insulin Molecule Are Shown. | Research Diagram

Insulin lispro [20, 21] (Humalog) (Figure 1) is the first genetically engineered rapid-acting insulin analogue, approved for clinical use in 1996. Its structure differs from human insulin in the B-chain where proline at position 28 and lysine at position 29 are reversed, leading to a molecule with reduced capacity of self-association in solution (therefore faster absorbed, with higher peak serum levels and shorter action duration in comparison to regular insulin). Besides glycemic management, lispro improves the postprandial leptin and grehlin regulation of type 1 diabetic patients and may be used in cases of gestational diabetes. Insulin aspart [20, 22] (NovoRapid) (Figure 1) structure differs from human insulin at position 28 where a proline is substituted with the charged aspartic acid, allowing it to be absorbed twice as fast as human insulin. It causes better glycaemic control when administered directly before a meal. Administration of aspart during pregnancy of type 1 diabetic women has been associated with reduced risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Insulin glulisine [20, 23, 24] (Apidra) (Figure 1) is the most recent rapid-acting analogue, launched in 2004. Its structure differs in two points from human insulin: asparagine at position 3 is substituted by lysine and lysine at position 29 by glutamic acid. These alterations reduce hexamers formation and enhance absorption from subcutaneous depots. Insulins lispro and glulisine have the same impact on the glycaemic control of type 1 diabetic patients but when evaluating their potential on obese, type 2 diabetic subjects, the rise in insulin concentration and onset of activity is faster for glulisine. In addition, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of glulisine does not exhibit negative correlation with B Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

1. Insulin glargine (Lantus) is a long-acting human insulin analogue, which is prepared by modifying the chemical structure of insulin to allow more consistent release during the day, thereby mimicking natural basal insulin release. Insulin glargine is licensed for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes where treatment with insulin is required. 2. Insulin glargine, injected subcutaneously, maintains a basal concentration of insulin in the blood that can be raised by supplementary injections of a short-acting insulin as required. Therefore, insulin glargine provides the basal component of basal- bolus insulin regimens. The prolonged absorption profile of insulin glargine, with no pronounced peaks over 24 hours, allows for once-daily dosing. Furthermore, as it does not require re-suspension prior to administration (because of its soluble formulation), it has the potential to reduce inter-and intra-user variability. A review concerning use of insulin analogues in diabetes concluded that (2): insulin glargine and insulin detemir both seem to result in glycaemic control that is at least comparable to that with isophane insulin insulin detemir appears to reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemia and result in less weight gain than does isophane insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes insulin glargine seems to reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes Reference: Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin (2004); 42(10):77-80. Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Twitter Summary: 1st ever “biosimilar” insulin approved in US – potential to come cheaper than other insulins, with launch in December 2016 Lilly/BI recently announced the FDA approval of its long-awaited biosimilar insulin glargine, Basaglar, for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Basaglar is biologically similar to Sanofi’s basal insulin Lantus (insulin glargine), including the same protein sequence and a similar glucose-lowering effect. While the FDA does not call it a “biosimilar” drug for regulatory reasons, it can essentially be thought of as an alternative form of Lantus. Pricing for Basaglar is unknown at this time (more on this below), and the drug will not be launching in the US until after December 15, 2016. Why are “biosimilar” insulin options exciting? Most notably, they could potentially be offered at lower costs than brand name insulins. Basaglar has already launched in several international countries (under the brand name Abasaglar) and is typically priced at a 15%-20% discount relative to Lantus in those markets. It’s not clear yet how the discounts for Basaglar will compare in the US, and how much less patients with insurance might pay. “Generic” versions of drugs in the US typically come at a 50-80% discount to the original product. But unlike most generic drugs, biosimilar insulins are much more expensive to manufacture, so it’s unlikely they’ll see that same level of discount in the US. Indeed, Novartis launched the first “biosimilar” drug approved in the US last September (not in diabetes), which came at a 15% discount. Still, we’ve heard great optimism that biosimilar insulin glargine will help patients facing higher insulin costs. At the IDF conference in December, Dr. Matthew Riddle suggested that of all the insulins new Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

What is Insulin Glargine (Lantus)? Insulin Glargine is recombinant human insulin analogue that act as blood-glucose-lowering agent. What is the generic and brand name of the drug? The drug is available under generic name Insulin Glargine and brand names Lantus , Toujeo,Abasaglar, and Basaglar What is the source of the drug (natural or synthetic)? Insulin Glargine is a synthetic bioengineered (man-made) injectable form of long-acting insulin. Why is this medication prescribed? Insulin Glargine acts as a long lasting (upto 24 hour duration) insulin, which reduces the amount of sugar in the blood and urine. The drug is used to treat patients with type 1diabetes or diabetes mellitus type 1. In type 1diabetes the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas were non functional and unable to produce insulin. The drug is also used to treat type 2 diabetes or noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, (condition in which insulin is not produced in sufficient amount or not effective due to insulin resistance) to control the blood sugar level. Insulin Glargine is recommended in combination with other short acting insulin in case of type 1 diabetes, while in case of type 2 diabetes, insulin Glargine may be used with short acting insulin or with oral drugs used to treat diabetes. Pharmacophore structure: Information about the chemical structure of the drug Insulin Glargine chemically belongs to the class of organic compounds which are known as s Amino Acids, Peptides, and Analogues. The drug is prepared by recombinant DNA technology in non pathogenic bacteria coli. The detailed chemical classification of Insulin Glargine is described below: Kingdom Organic compounds Super Class Organic Acids Class Carboxylic Acids and Derivatives Sub Class Amino Acids, Peptides, and Analogues Direct P Continue reading >>

Supramolecular Protein Engineering

Supramolecular Protein Engineering

From the Departments of Biochemistry and Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 2 To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: michael.weiss{at}case.edu. 1 Both authors contributed equally to this work. Bottom-up control of supramolecular protein assembly can provide a therapeutic nanobiotechnology. We demonstrate that the pharmacological properties of insulin can be enhanced by design of zinc staples between hexamers. Paired (i, i+4) His substitutions were introduced at an -helical surface. The crystal structure contains both classical axial zinc ions and novel zinc ions at hexamer-hexamer interfaces. Although soluble at pH 4, the combined electrostatic effects of the substitutions and bridging zinc ions cause isoelectric precipitation at neutral pH. Following subcutaneous injection in a diabetic rat, the analog effected glycemic control with a time course similar to that of long acting formulation Lantus. Relative to Lantus, however, the analog discriminates at least 30-fold more stringently between the insulin receptor and mitogenic insulin-like growth factor receptor. Because aberrant mitogenic signaling may be associated with elevated cancer risk, such enhanced specificity may improve safety. Zinc stapling provides a general strategy to modify the pharmacokinetic and biological properties of a subcutaneous protein depot. Supramolecular chemistry envisages the construction of novel materials and nanoscale devices ranging from molecular sensors to stimulus-responsive polymers ( 1 , 2 ). Spatial organization may be achieved either by templating (design from the top down) or through self-assembly of molecular components (bottom up). Connective tissue provides an example of the bottom-up design of a biomaterial based Continue reading >>

Biosimilar Insulin: The Current Landscape

Biosimilar Insulin: The Current Landscape

Abstract The first insulin biosimilar, Abasaglar, is now available in the UK and several more are in development. Biosimilars are manufactured copies of previously approved biopharmaceuticals no longer under patent protection. They are not identical versions of their reference product due to the complexity of their production and resultant protein product. The present article reviews the current biosimilar landscape including manufacture, regulatory requirements, safety and prescribing issues. Abasaglar is used to illustrate the process of biosimilar development and approval. Introduction Since insulin was isolated in 1922, its production has continued to evolve, more recently with the ‘incremental innovation’1 of insulin analogues with improved pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. The approval of Abasaglar, biosimilar glargine insulin, marks the latest development in insulin therapy.2 Biosimilars are manufactured copies of previously approved biopharmaceuticals which are no longer under patent. They are produced in the same way, have similar actions to their reference product, but are not identical due to the complexity of the numerous steps in their production and of the resultant protein molecules. There are several biosimilar products available across a number of clinical indications, including erythropoietin, somatotropin, infliximab, and filgrastim. Abasaglar (insulin glargine) is the first biosimilar insulin to market, with others pending. At present, the insulin market is dominated by a few pharmaceutical companies. While generic drugs offer bigger savings (approximately 80% reduction compared to the reference drug) biosimilars are estimated to cost 20–30% less than their originator drug.3 Therefore, they offer lower cost alternatives with the pot Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Lantus (insulin Glargine [rdna Origin] Injection)

The following drug information is obtained from various newswires, published medical journal articles, and medical conference presentations. Specific Treatments: For adults and children w/Type 1 diabetes, or adults w/Type 2 diabetes requiring basal insulin to control hyperglycemia Lantus is the first FDA approved long-acting (basal) recombinant human insulin analog with a once-daily administration and a 24-hour glucose-lowering effect. This biosynthetic insulin, injected subcutaneously and designed to mimic NPH human insulin, is indicated for both adult and pediatric patients with Type 1 diabetes. It may also be used for the treatment of adults with Type 2 diabetes who require basal insulin for the control of hyperglycemia. The chemical structure of Lantus allows for regulated release of the insulin into the circulation with a glucose-lowering effect over a 24-hour period. In clinical studies, no specific pronounced peak was detected over this period. In clinical studies, the efficacy of Lantus, measured by metabolic control, was comparable to NPH human insulin. In addition, Lantus had a slower absorption rate than NPH human insulin. This absorption allowed for a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24-hours. The glucose-lowering effect was detected over the entire 24-hour period. As with other insulin therapies, Lantus can cause the following side effects (with hypoglycemia being the most common adverse effect): Hypoglycemia Worsening of diabetic retinopathy Lipodystrophy Skin reactions (such as injection-site reaction, pruritus, and rash)* Allergic reactions Sodium retention Edema *In clinical trials, patients treated with Lantus had a higher incidence of injection-site pain (2.7%) than did patients receiving NPH human insulin (0.7%). In general, the re Continue reading >>

-insulin Glargine Injection In Stock[] -- Powered By Dvbbs.net,2018-4-3 9:30:41

-insulin Glargine Injection In Stock[] -- Powered By Dvbbs.net,2018-4-3 9:30:41

----Insulin Glargine Injection in stock(Long acting insulin glargine Injections[Drug name]:Common name:Glargine Insulin InjectionTrade name:Tang AolinChinese Pinyin:Ganjing Yidaosu Zhesheye[Ingredient]:Active ingredient:Insulin GlargineChemical name:Chemical structure formula:Molecular formula:Molecular weight:6063Auxiliary material:zinc chloride,metacresol,glycerinum,sodiumhydrate,hydrochloric acid[Character]Colorless clear liquor[Indications]Diabetes[Specification]3ml:300 unit/piece[Usage and dosage]Usage Insulin Glargine should be shot through subcutaneous injection.You should not shot it through intravenous injection,or it may cause badly glycopenia.If there is no clinical differences in the level of serum insulin or the glucose after the subcutaneous injection to the abdomendeltoid or thigh.You should take turns of your injection area.[Dosage]According to the patients situation,one should use it under the doctors guidance.[Taboo]Patients who are hypoglycemic or allergic to the insulin glargine. [Storage]The insulin glargine should be stored in the refrigerator at the temperature of 2 to 8 degrees.Its better be used up in 30 days.Avoid light and heat.[Expiry date]18 months[Manufacturing enterprise]Corporate name:Liaoning Boao Biological Pharmaceutical Co.,ltdAddress:Shennong Street No.55,Economic Technological Development District,Benxi,Liaoning,ChinaPhone No.:024-45689501LiaoNing BoAo Biological Pharmaceutical Co.,Ltd founded in 2010.We keep on drawing advanced experience from both domestic and overseas after 6 years,we make independent innovation and Develop three kinds of insulin APIs and injections.Now is the leading enterprise in Liaoning Province.We are one of the leading China manufacturers and suppliers of long acting insulin glargine injections. Should you Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine - Australian Prescriber

Insulin Glargine - Australian Prescriber

Some of the views expressed in the following notes on newly approved products should be regarded as preliminary, as there may have been limited published data at the time of publication, and little experience in Australia of their safety or efficacy. However, the Editorial Executive Committee believes that comments made in good faith at an early stage may still be of value. Before new drugs are prescribed, the Committee believes it is important that more detailed information is obtained from the manufacturer's approved product information, a drug information centre or some other appropriate source. 100 IU/mL in 3 mL cartridges, and 5 mL and 10 mL vials Australian Medicines Handbook section 10.1.1 Insulin glargine is a recombinant insulin. Its chemical structure differs from human insulin by three amino acids. The molecule is completely soluble at pH4, but after injection it becomes less soluble. Microprecipitates form, and these allow a slow continuous release of insulin. These properties make a daily injection of insulin glargine suitable for providing a patient's basal insulin requirements. In clinical trials insulin glargine had similar effects to NPH human insulin, but in some studies fewer patients experienced symptomatic hypoglycaemia. These trials were relatively short, so the long-term effectiveness of insulin glargine is currently unknown. Patients may find insulin glargine more painful to inject because of its acidity. It should not be mixed with other insulins. An analysis by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in the UK concluded that while insulin glargine is an option for type 1 diabetes, it is not recommended for routine use in people with type 2 diabetes who require insulin. 1 Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas. Both are insulin analogues, which means that their insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin, but engineered, or recombined, with slight differences that slow their absorption. Lantus is a clear formula made with glargine, a genetically modified form of human insulin, dissolved in a special solution. Levemir is also a clear formula, but it contains dissolved detemir, a different form of genetically modified insulin. Human insulin is made of two amino acid chains, called A and B, that have two disulfide bonds between them. In glargine, one amino acid has been switched out, and two extra amino acids have been added to one end of the B chain. The modifications make glargine soluble at an acidic pH, but much less soluble at the neutral pH that’s found in the body To make Lantus, first the glargine is produced by a vat of E. coli bacteria. Then it’s purified and added to a watery solution containing a little zinc and some glycerol; a dash of hydrochloric acid is also added to make it acidic, bringing its pH down to about 4. At that degree of acidity, glargine completely dissolves into the watery solution, which is why the vial is clear. After you inject it into your subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized by your body to a neutral pH. Because glargine is not soluble at a neutral pH, it precipitates out into a form that’s not soluble in subcutaneous fat, and there forms a relatively insoluble depot. From that pool, or depot, of precipitated glargine in the tissues, small amounts slowly move back Continue reading >>

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