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Insulin Cycle Results

Dnp And Insulin For Dramatic Results

Dnp And Insulin For Dramatic Results

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- okay so im on day 5 of dnp workin pretty good im 210 2 weeks out from show a lil water retention at 400 mgs of dnp just found an article on the benefits of using insulin as well with dnp anyone have any expierence 1 g test cyp - stopping 10 days out from show 400 mg dnp - - stopping 8 days out from show hgh 3 iu - stopping 10 days out from show DNP diet is 50% carbs / 35% protein / 15% fats just mainly rotating calories low med high heres some input i found on insulin and dnp dosage: -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Insulin therapy is crucial to achieve the massive size exhibited by today's professional bodybuilders. However, extreme caution must be exercised when using insulin to avoid a dangerous drop in blood sugars. Compounding this problem is the fact that significant amounts of insulin must be used to achieve the desired effect. In my research, I've seen very few articles accurately state the amount of insulin that should be used to induce anabolism. Most articles quote figures that are next to useless, in the range of 1-3 iu's a few times a day. Realistically, insulin is most effective when used in the 30-40 iu's a day range, with some professional bodybuilders using 3 times that amount! Carbohydrates must be consumed every time a dose of insulin is administered. A good rule of thumb is to consume 10 grams of carbohydrates for every 1 iu of insulin that is used. Since most doses Continue reading >>

Hgh And Insulin

Hgh And Insulin

Our information is for people who have already used HGH for several times, has spent a lot of hours in the gym, and is not new in this business. First of all, it is necessary to focus your attention on the fact that this way is extremely expensive, and if you know a cost effective method, then why don’t you try it? One more expensive but effective method that is available is using IGF-1 together with HGH. In this case you can have your HGH a little bit lower, but have a nice thrill, and this method is quicker than using only HGH. We have also found out that there are no side effects while increasing HGH. We are able to stay at 2 iu’s a day of HGH and be well, and apply the IGF-1 at 80mcg on the days of lifting. Thanks to the insulin the peptides give a real 1-2 punch, and you need to apply this during 4 weeks, then 4 weeks without this, again 4 weeks with this and 4 weeks out of it, and again 4 weeks with this. Only if you have diabetic problems, you should keep up to insulin only. The HGH is applied at 2 iu’s a day during 5 days and 2 days without it. The IGF-1 will be run according to the same schemes as the insulin: 4 weeks with it, 4 weeks out, 4 with it, 4 out, and 4 weeks with it. So, if you are interested in our 20 week cycle, you need the following: 2 kits of HGH, 3 phials of IGF-1 and some insulin like humalog or nolvalog that act quickly. If you can’t get humalog or nolvalog, you can try humulin-R (it is sold in some drug-stores without any restrictions). It is not necessary to have insulin for this, since HGH and IGF-1 will be quite enough. As to the steroids, we offer you some basic compounds and the dosage is rather moderate. You can choose something among the lines of testosterone deca or testosterone EQ. You will use them along with your peptides Continue reading >>

The 20 Week Hgh/igf-1/insulin Blast

The 20 Week Hgh/igf-1/insulin Blast

What I want to talk about in this post is a 20 week plan to build some new muscle. This is for the guy who has cycled steroids numerous times, has been in the gym for several years, and is not what I'd consider “new to the game”. This is for an experienced bodybuilder who wants to take his level of development to the next level. [Disclaimer: John Doe Bodybuilding is not advising anyone use ANY illegal or possibly dangerous hormones or substances under any circumstances UNLESS it is under a doctor's strict supervision.] The first thing you need to understand is that this shit gets expensive, and if you can find a cost effective way to grow then by all means do it!! One of the more cost effective ways I've found was to run IGF-1 with HGH. It allows you to keep your HGH a little lower and still gives you a nice bang, and it's faster than just HGH alone. I also find that I don't get the extreme side effects from going higher on the HGH, I can stay right at 2 iu's a day of HGH and feel good, and run the IGF-1 at 80 mcg on the days I lift. The insulin gives the peptides a real 1-2 punch, and you will be using that 4 weeks on, 4 weeks off, 4 weeks on, 4 weeks off, 4 weeks on. Unless you're like me and you're diabetic, then you just stay on insulin, LOL. The HGH will be ran at 2 iu's/day, 5 days on and 2 days off. The IGF-1 will be used 4 weeks on, 4 off, 4 weeks on, 4 off, and last 4 weeks on again. So what you will need for this 20 week cycle is 2 kits of HGH, 3 vials of IGF-1, and some fast acting insulin such as humalog or nolvalog. If you don't have access to humalog or nolvalog then humulin-R is fine, and humulin-R can be purchased over the counter without a prescription in most places. You DON'T NEED INSULIN for this, as just HGH and IGF-1 will also work exceptionall Continue reading >>

Insulin And Insulin Resistance

Insulin And Insulin Resistance

Go to: Abstract As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the compl Continue reading >>

The Insulin Advantage

The Insulin Advantage

Here's what you need to know... If you think bulking and cutting are seasonal, think again. By controlling your insulin you can allow your body to build muscle and burn fat daily. Muscle is made of protein. To build muscle, your body must synthesize more protein than it catabolizes. Insulin is responsible for muscle growth and the storage of muscle glycogen. Excess insulin production will lead to the storage of body fat and the inhibition of fat burning. To build muscle and burn fat on the same day, manipulate your insulin production by consuming carbs strategically. Prioritize carb consumption around workout time. Daily Manipulation Forget the idea of the seasonal "bulking" and "cutting" phases that the newbies love to talk about. Instead, bulk and cut throughout the day, maximizing muscle gains while controlling body fat. How? By manipulating insulin. Depending on your background, you probably think of insulin as either the anabolic Holy Grail or the natural enemy of fat loss. Which is it? Insulin is Like a Weapon It's human nature to label something as good or bad, but this myopic outlook often does us more harm than good. Those wanting fat loss call insulin the "bad" hormone that's making us chubby by inhibiting fat burning and increasing fat storage. Those wanting muscle growth call insulin the anabolic and anti-catabolic phenomenon. How can one hormone be a fat boy's nemesis and a skinny boy's best defense? The truth is, insulin is like a weapon: it can hurt you or help you. And the good news is we can accurately predict how insulin will act. Know Your Opponent Insulin is an anabolic hormone. In fact, it's even more anabolic than growth hormone. The problem? It's indiscriminately anabolic and doesn't care whether it helps with the building of muscle or the accumul Continue reading >>

Dynamics Of Glucose And Insulin Concentration Connected To The Cell Cycle: Model Development And Analysis

Dynamics Of Glucose And Insulin Concentration Connected To The Cell Cycle: Model Development And Analysis

Dynamics of glucose and insulin concentration connected to the cell cycle: model development and analysis 1Institute of Biomathematics and Biometry, Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany 2Scientific Computing Research Unit, Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany 3Department of Mathematics, Technical University Munich, Garching, Germany Received 2012 Jul 25; Accepted 2012 Oct 18. Copyright 2012 Gallenberger et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases with increased blood glucose concentration as the main symptom. This can be caused by a relative or a total lack of insulin which is produced by the cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Recent experimental results indicate the relevance of the cell cycle for the development of diabetes mellitus. This paper introduces a mathematical model that connects the dynamics of glucose and insulin concentration with the cell cycle. The interplay of glucose, insulin, and cell cycle is described with a system of ordinary differential equations. The model and its development will be presented as well as its mathematical analysis. The latter investigates the steady states of the model and their stability. Our model shows the connection of glucose and insulin concentrations to the cell cycle. In this way the important role of glucose as regulator of the cell cycle and the capability of the cell ma Continue reading >>

Steroids: What Pro Bodybuilders Are Really Using

Steroids: What Pro Bodybuilders Are Really Using

Here's what you need to know... A pro bodybuilder could spend $8,000 to $20,000 for a 16-week competition cycle. Most pros are regularly monitored by trusted doctors who know exactly what they're using. Most health issues and deaths associated with bodybuilders are related not to steroid use but rather recreational drug use. That being said, diuretics and insulin can get a bodybuilder into trouble. This article contains the real drug cycle of a professional bodybuilder. Do not attempt it. Editor's Note: T Nation was approached by an IFBB pro bodybuilder who wanted to write anonymous articles for us as well as answer questions honestly in our steroid forum. After verifying his identity we decided to give him a platform. "Shadow Pro" was born. The Truth Remember those heated debates you heard as a kid about whether or not pro wrestling was real? Well, when I first started bodybuilding there were people actually arguing about whether or not the pros used steroids and other drugs. Really. You can't blame them (entirely). The magazines at the time never said a word about steroids and the pros of course couldn't be forthright when someone was brave enough to ask. It was a huge secret... and yet it really wasn't. Today things have changed, but I still hear a lot of lies and misconceptions about steroid use in professional, amateur, and "natural" bodybuilding. Most of this comes from online rumors and internet "gurus" throwing around nonsense. I want to set a few things straight about the real cycles used by pros and top amateurs. An Inside Peek First, let's talk about health. Yes, we care about that. Most of us at least. Perfect diet and supplementation play a huge role in keeping us healthy while on a cycle. If we eat like shit and neglect our health, then we can expect to lo Continue reading >>

Longitudinal Study Of Insulin Resistance And Sex Hormones Over The Menstrual Cycle: The Biocycle Study

Longitudinal Study Of Insulin Resistance And Sex Hormones Over The Menstrual Cycle: The Biocycle Study

Longitudinal Study of Insulin Resistance and Sex Hormones over the Menstrual Cycle: The BioCycle Study Epidemiology Branch (E.H.Y., C.Z., S.L.M., A.Y., E.F.S.), Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland 20892; Search for other works by this author on: Epidemiology Branch (E.H.Y., C.Z., S.L.M., A.Y., E.F.S.), Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland 20892; Search for other works by this author on: Epidemiology Branch (E.H.Y., C.Z., S.L.M., A.Y., E.F.S.), Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland 20892; Search for other works by this author on: Epidemiology Branch (E.H.Y., C.Z., S.L.M., A.Y., E.F.S.), Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland 20892; Search for other works by this author on: University of Nevada Health Sciences System (M.T.), Las Vegas, Nevada 89103; Search for other works by this author on: Epidemiology Program (L.C.), School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Biotechnical and Clinical Laboratory Sciences (R.W.B.), University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 Department of Social and Preventive Medicine (R.W.B., J.W.-W.), University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 Search for other works by this author on: Department of Social and Preventive Medicine (R.W.B Continue reading >>

Sleep Architecture, Insulin Resistance And The Nasal Cycle: Implications For Positive Airway Pressure Therapy | Crofts | Journal Of Insulin Resistance

Sleep Architecture, Insulin Resistance And The Nasal Cycle: Implications For Positive Airway Pressure Therapy | Crofts | Journal Of Insulin Resistance

The Public Have Been Lied To About Sugar Says Top Doctor, Dr Aseem Malhotra, authorof the latest published article . Sleep architecture, insulin resistance and the nasal cycle: Implications for positive airway pressure therapy Catherine A.P. Crofts, Alister Neill, Angela Campbell, Jim Bartley, David E. White Journal of Insulin Resistance | Vol 3, No 1 | a34 | DOI: | 2018 Catherine A.P. Crofts, Alistair Neil, Angela Campbell, Jim Bartley, David E. White | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0 Submitted: 09 January 2018| Published: 28 March 2018 Catherine A.P. Crofts, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand Alister Neill, WellSleep Clinic, University of Otago, New Zealand Angela Campbell, WellSleep Clinic, University of Otago, New Zealand Jim Bartley, Department of Surgery, University of Otago, New Zealand David E. White, BioDesign Lab, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand Background: The global pandemic of metabolic disease is worsening. The metabolic theory of obesity proposes that hormonal changes, especially hyperinsulinaemia, precede metabolic disease development. Although quality sleep is recognised as a key factor for good health, less is known about disrupted sleep as a risk factor for hyperinsulinaemia. Aim: To explore the relationship between sleep, especially sleep architecture and the nasal cycle, on insulin secretion in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) with comorbid metabolic disease. This review includes a discussion of the potential role of Rest-Activity-Cycler positive airway pressure (RACer-PAP), a novel non-pharmacological OSA treatment strategy. Methods: A narrative review of all the relevant papers known to the authors was conducted. This review also included results from a polysomn Continue reading >>

How To Interpret Blood Glucose Monitoring Charts And Adjust Insulin Doses

How To Interpret Blood Glucose Monitoring Charts And Adjust Insulin Doses

Interpreting blood glucose results and being able to adjust insulin doses are useful skills for pharmacists to possess.The key to acquiring these skills is in understanding: The insulin regimen and the onset, peak and duration of action for the insulins used The glucose levels to aim for How to titrate insulin doses How all of the above relates to patients’ lifestyles and eating habits Understanding the regimen Insulin may be given alone or, for those with type 2 diabetes, with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), often metformin. Although this article focuses on adjusting insulin doses, readers should bear in mind that oral doses may also need to be adjusted. The three most commonly used insulin regimens are: Once daily intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin — normally given at bedtime or during the day, usually with an OAD Twice-daily pre-mixed insulin — one injection before breakfast, one before the evening meal (pre-mixed insulins contain fixed ratios of short- and long-acting insulins) Basal-bolus insulin — three daily injections of rapid- or short-acting insulin with meals and one or two injections of intermediate- or long-acting (basal) insulin The onset, peak and duration profiles of insulin products currentlyavailable in the UK are in the table. These should be used wheninterpreting a blood glucose result, to determine which insulin wasexerting its effect at the time of glucose measurement. Insulin preparations and their onset, peak and duration of action Preparation Onset (hr) Peak (hr) Duration (hr) Soluble insulin Human Actrapid 0.5 2–5 8 Humulin S 0.5 1–3 5–7 Hypurin Bovine Neutral 0.5/1 2–5 6–8 Apidra (Insulin glulisine) 0.25 1 3–4 Humalog (Insulin lispro) 0.25 1–1.5 2–5 Novorapid (Insulin aspart) 0.25 1–3 3–5 Hypurin Porcine Neu Continue reading >>

Growth Hormone: What Is It And What Does It Doan Expert's View!

Growth Hormone: What Is It And What Does It Doan Expert's View!

Growth Hormone: What Is It And What Does It DoAn Expert's View! Since its inception, and first application as a bodybuilding super-substance GH has remained an anabolic that has attracted many conflicting opinions and has been shrouded in mystery. In their quest for greater muscle size and the ripped, dry look that characterizes a top-level bodybuilding physique, competitors have, since the 1950's, as is generally thought, used a variety of supplemental substances, both naturally and pharmaceutically derived. After experiencing unprecedented muscle growth with anabolic steroids in the early '60s (a time when these drugs were used in larger quantities as the level of bodybuilding competition increased), bodybuilding competitors knew they had found the critical factor necessary to take them several steps higher towards physical perfection, and iron warriors the world over have not looked back since. With the 1970's ushering in a new era for competitive sporting success, with the emergence of lucrative contracts and entire careers based a upon athletic ability, a new compound found its way into the drug regimes of champions not adverse to pushing the boundaries: growth hormone (GH). As a hormone critical for the health and well being of all humans, growth hormone is needed in precise amounts for the optimal functioning of a number of physiological processes and growth of body tissues, including muscle. Generally this is achieved, resulting in growth and functioning within 'acceptable' and 'normal' parameters. However, an over or under production of GH can potentially cause serious health concerns. Excess GH, as occurs in those with Acromegaly, ultimately leads to an overgrowth of tissues and problems such insulin resistance and muscle weakness. GH-secreting tumors, occurr Continue reading >>

Insulin Only Cycle Results.

Insulin Only Cycle Results.

i just finished my 2 month insulin cycle 4 weeks ago. i waited 4 weeks to post about it, so i can give you guys insights on the results and blood glucose changes. first off, i started this cycle at 145 pounds, 12% body fat. i took only insulin and caffeine during this controlled cycle. i would eat 15 grams of protein and 5 grams of carbs every 2 hours(even while sleeping) the first two weeks were the most beneficial. went up to 170. the only side effects were bad gas 24/7 from the protein, extremely bloated around the stomach, and alot of weird diarrhea. (sometimes yellow mucus, brown slime, looked like decomposed sea weed wrapped around a dark brown log at times) after the first two weeks, i cut my diet back to EXACTLY what i was eating before the cycle. you can guess, my progress slowed, but i was still progressing. in the next 6 weeks, i went up 10 pounds. now keep in mind that at times, i ate under 80 grams of protein per day, and 1500-2500 calories a day. As you can see, the most benefits come from insulin when you par it with alot of calories! the more you eat, the more you grow. but oddly i still put on mass(slowly) during a calorie deficit on the last 6 weeks. im guessing this due to the non catabolic properties of the insulin, and helped me get the most out of every single gram of food i ate. I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DEATHS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS PROTOCOL) haha hope i didnt scare you! its honestly not that dangerous, just study your body when you start, and dont starve yourself while on this. you will get SUPER hungry if you do not eat, so its kind of hard going hypo because your stuffing your face while on this stuff because it makes you crazy hungry. day 1: 5ius an hour before workout. 50 grams of carbs, 30 grams of protien. day 2: 10ius an hour before wor Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

This article is about the insulin protein. For uses of insulin in treating diabetes, see insulin (medication). Not to be confused with Inulin. Insulin (from Latin insula, island) is a peptide hormone produced by beta cells of the pancreatic islets, and it is considered to be the main anabolic hormone of the body.[5] It regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and protein by promoting the absorption of, especially, glucose from the blood into fat, liver and skeletal muscle cells.[6] In these tissues the absorbed glucose is converted into either glycogen via glycogenesis or fats (triglycerides) via lipogenesis, or, in the case of the liver, into both.[6] Glucose production and secretion by the liver is strongly inhibited by high concentrations of insulin in the blood.[7] Circulating insulin also affects the synthesis of proteins in a wide variety of tissues. It is therefore an anabolic hormone, promoting the conversion of small molecules in the blood into large molecules inside the cells. Low insulin levels in the blood have the opposite effect by promoting widespread catabolism, especially of reserve body fat. Beta cells are sensitive to glucose concentrations, also known as blood sugar levels. When the glucose level is high, the beta cells secrete insulin into the blood; when glucose levels are low, secretion of insulin is inhibited.[8] Their neighboring alpha cells, by taking their cues from the beta cells,[8] secrete glucagon into the blood in the opposite manner: increased secretion when blood glucose is low, and decreased secretion when glucose concentrations are high.[6][8] Glucagon, through stimulating the liver to release glucose by glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, has the opposite effect of insulin.[6][8] The secretion of insulin and glucagon into the Continue reading >>

Insulin Binding Characteristics In Canine Muscle Tissue: Effects Of The Estrous Cycle Phases

Insulin Binding Characteristics In Canine Muscle Tissue: Effects Of The Estrous Cycle Phases

Insulin binding characteristics in canine muscle tissue: effects of the estrous cycle phases Caractersticas de ligao da insulina no tecido muscular canino: efeitos da fase do ciclo estral 2 Setor de Clnica de Pequenos Animais, Hospital de Clnicas Veterinrias. Departamento de Medicina Animal, Faculdade de Veterinria, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Avenida Bento Gonalves 9090, Agronomia, Porto Alegre, RS 91540-000, Brazil. 3 Laboratrio de Metabolismo e Endocrinologia Comparada, Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Cincias Bsicas da Sade, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Sarmento Leite 500, Porto Alegre, RS 90050-170, Brazil. 4 Laboratrio de Anlises Clnicas Veterinrias, Hospital de Clnicas Veterinrias, Departamento de Patologia Clnica Animal, Faculdade de Veterinria, UFRGS, Av. Bento Gonalves 9090, Porto Alegre, RS 91540-000, Brazil. Hormonal fluctuations during the different estrous cycle are a well-recognized cause of insulin resistance in bitches, and little is known about insulin receptor binding or post-binding defects associated with insulin resistance in dogs. To evaluate insulin binding characteristics in muscle tissue of bitches during the estrous cycle, 17 owned bitches were used in the study (six in anestrus, five in estrus, and six in diestrus). An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed in all patients by means of injection of 1mL/kg of a glucose 50% solution (500mg/kg), with blood sample collection for glucose determination at 0, 3, 5, 7, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after glucose infusion. Muscle samples, taken after spaying surgery, were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen and then stored at -80 C until the membranes were prepared by sequential centrifugation after being homogenized. For binding Continue reading >>

You And Your Hormones

You And Your Hormones

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ located behind the stomach called the pancreas. Here, insulin is released into the bloodstream by specialised cells called beta cells found in areas of the pancreas called islets of langerhans (the term insulin comes from the Latin insula meaning island). Insulin can also be given as a medicine for patients with diabetes because they do not make enough of their own. It is usually given in the form of an injection. Insulin is released from the pancreas into the bloodstream. It is a hormone essential for us to live and has many effects on the whole body, mainly in controlling how the body uses carbohydrate and fat found in food. Insulin allows cells in the muscles, liver and fat (adipose tissue) to take up sugar (glucose) that has been absorbed into the bloodstream from food. This provides energy to the cells. This glucose can also be converted into fat to provide energy when glucose levels are too low. In addition, insulin has several other metabolic effects (such as stopping the breakdown of protein and fat). How is insulin controlled? When we eat food, glucose is absorbed from our gut into the bloodstream. This rise in blood glucose causes insulin to be released from the pancreas. Proteins in food and other hormones produced by the gut in response to food also stimulate insulin release. However, once the blood glucose levels return to normal, insulin release slows down. In addition, hormones released in times of acute stress, such as adrenaline, stop the release of insulin, leading to higher blood glucose levels. The release of insulin is tightly regulated in healthy people in order to balance food intake and the metabolic needs of the body. Insulin works in tandem with glucagon, another hormone produced by the pan Continue reading >>

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