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Insulin Cancer Treatment

Insulin Potentiation Therapy | Drstegall.com

Insulin Potentiation Therapy | Drstegall.com

We know that chemotherapy works in killing cancer cells. The dilemma in conventional oncology is whether the high doses of chemotherapy used over time will kill the patient before it kills the cancer. High dose chemotherapy often carries with it significant toxicity symptoms affectingmultiple organ systems including digestive organs, the brain, heart, and lungs. This is why many patients feel much worse after starting chemotherapy than they did before treatment began. Sadly, the toxicity burden can weigh heavily on patients bodies, resulting in significant collateral damage, poor quality of life, and death. Insulin potentiation therapy, known as IPT, is a procedure whereby low doses of chemotherapy are given on a more frequent basis. By administering safe doses of insulin along with specific chemotherapeutic agents, the chemotherapy is preferentially taken up by cancer cells due to those cells unique physiology. Thedoses of chemotherapy used in IPT are usually about 10-20% of the amount used by most oncologists in conventional treatment. Lower doses of chemotherapy mean that: The bodys healthy cells are exposed to significantly less chemotherapy The incidence and severity of side effects such as nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and hair loss are much lower Dr. Stegall views IPT as a heat-seeking missile, precisely targeted with very little collateral damage. Contrast this with conventional high dose chemotherapy, which is analogous to the atom bomb which results in widespread damage. Many people who are not familiar with IPT believe that it must be a new therapy. However, it was actually developed in the 1930s by Donato Perez Garcia, MD to treat syphilis. He soon realized that it could be effective in other diseases as well, and began using it successfully to treat cancer pa Continue reading >>

Does It Work? / Insulin Potentiation Therapy / Dietary Approaches / Cam-cancer

Does It Work? / Insulin Potentiation Therapy / Dietary Approaches / Cam-cancer

IPT inventor Perez and his successors claimed that several cancer patients were successfully treated with IPT 1 ,3 , though case reports or clinical trials to substantiate these claims have never been published in peer-reviewed journals. More recently, two small clinical studies and four cases have been published in peer-reviewed journals. In a small uncontrolled study 4 , 16 patients with castration-resistant tumours were treated with insulin (0.4 units per kg body weight at 5-day intervals) in combination with goserelin depot (3.6 mg) and low-dose chemotherapy, i.e., eight patients with: cyclophosphamide (0.100.15 g/m2) + epirubicin (3 mg/m2) + vinblastine (0.5 mg/m2), and eight patients with docetaxel (3.6 mg/m2). Overall prostate-specific antigen (PSA) results after the sixth course of IPT showed partial effect in eight patients, stabilization in four patients, and disease progression in four patients; the median survival for all treated patients was 11.7 months. During the treatment no significant side effects were observed, and no lethal cases occurred. In a small prospective, controlled, randomized clinical trial 5 , IPT was tested in 30 women suffering from metastatic breast cancer resistant to 5-fluorouracil + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide and to hormone therapy with measurable lesions 4 . Patients were divided in three groups of ten: a group receiving only the anticancer drug methotrexate (2.5 mg/m2 every other day), a group receiving only insulin (0.3 units per kg body weight every other day), and a group receiving a combination of both. Drugs were given in two 3-week courses with a 1-week interval in-between. After 8 weeks, the sizes of the target tumours were measured and compared to the respective sizes before treatment. Progressive disease was less freq Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy And Cancer

Insulin Potentiation Therapy And Cancer

Donato Perez Garcia, a medical doctor from Mexico, developed IPT in the early 1930s. In 1939, he registered the treatment with the U.S. Patent Office as a treatment for syphilis and neurosyphilis . Some argue it reduces or removes negative side effects of chemo without reducing overall effectiveness of the treatment. Garcias son and grandson continued working with IPT. In a 1986 paper , they argued IPT can be used as an adjunct when managing chronic diseases. They said insulin naturally makes cell membranes more permeable. This is because cancer cells have more insulin receptors than normal cells. When insulin is released into the bloodstream in response to a change in blood sugar levels, the insulin attaches to these cells and allow nutrients to enter the cell. When the excess insulin receptors on cancer cells are activated, its theoretically easier to specifically target them for treatment. The theory is that when using it with chemotherapy, insulin makes the medication more effective. As a result, its argued that IPT targets cancer cells and requires less chemotherapy to get the same results. Less chemo drugs, then, mean fewer or less severe side effects. Apart from the lack of scientific or clinical evidence endorsing IPT, this treatment does carry a known set of risks. IPT carries a risk of developing hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This is potentially deadly. The body releases insulin naturally after a rise in blood sugar . Artificially introducing insulin, such as with IPT, can produce a rapid decrease in blood sugar. If your blood sugar falls low enough, you can experience: After the insulin is administered and blood sugar falls, IPT practitioners rapidly inject a cocktail of glucose and chemotherapy drugs in doses that are below the proven, effective amounts Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy - Welcome To Cancer Cure Foundation

Insulin Potentiation Therapy - Welcome To Cancer Cure Foundation

Information from Steven Ayre's website: Chemotherapy drugs are powerful cell-killing agents. In current medical practice, getting these drugs into the inside of cells where they do their work requires that they be administered in doses high enough to force them across the membranes of cancer cells. A major drawback to this dosing strategy is a serious dose-related side effect profile frequently seen with anticancer drugs. This happens because chemotherapy agents do not discriminate between cancer cells and other normal cells in the patient's body. They kill both kinds of cells, therefore there are side effects. With recent advances in our understanding of the inner workings of cancer cells, it is now possible to avoid the dose-related side effects of chemotherapy, while at the same time increasing the effectiveness and specificity of these agents in killing cancer cells. The key to this is an innovative strategy for drug delivery called Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT). Readers will recognize insulin as being the hormone used to treat diabetes. Secreted by the pancreas in healthy people, insulin is a powerful hormone with many actions in the human body, a principal one being to manage the delivery of glucose across cell membranes into cells. Insulin communicates its messages to cells by joining up with specific insulin receptors scattered on the outer surface of the cell membranes. Every cell in the human body has some of these receptors, with there being from one hundred to one hundred thousand of them per cell. One might well ask, "What does any of this have to do with cancer cells?" It is a well-known scientific fact that cancer cells have a voracious appetite for glucose. Glucose is their unique source of energy, and because of the relatively inefficient way canc Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) is one of the safest and most innovative approaches to treating cancer. IPT is an alternative cancer treatment that has almost none of the side effects such as nausea, radical hair loss, liver damage, and DNA distortion with standard chemotherapy, so it is appealing to patients who recognize the need for chemotherapy but want to do it in a safer, gentler manner. IPT embodies a potentially revolutionary concept in the medical management of a chronic degenerative disease. It has been hailed by those familiar with its precepts as the summum bonum of allopathic medicine.In its applications, physicians who use IPT feel that it offers a comparable level of clinical success compared to conventional full-dose chemotherapy, but typically without side effects such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hair loss, and immune suppression. Dr. Jonathan Stegall founder of the Center for Advanced Medicine, one of Cancer Tutor's verified clinics practices integrative oncology, which involves combining the best of modern medicine with natural therapies. The key to IPT as a cancer treatment lies in the off-label use of insulin, a hormone made by the body. Insulin is responsible for the delivery of glucose from the bloodstream, across cell membranes, and into the cells. Cancer cells have up to 20 times more insulin receptors on their surface than normal cells because cancer requires glucose for its energy production. When insulin is released into the bloodstream by the pancreas in response to a meal, the insulin attaches to these receptors on the surface of the cell and, like a key fitting into a lock, opens channels in the cell wall to allow nutrients to go into the cell. Because cancer cells have more of these insulin receptors, they outcompete the bodys norm Continue reading >>

Cancer Active

Cancer Active

Thank you for helping us to raise a fantastic 19,708 for our new CANCERactive website which will be launched in 2018 Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) uses a cancer cells need for sugar, and thus insulin receptors, to create a feeding frenzy, at which point low doses of chemotherapy can more easily kill off the cancer. As you would expect, the therapy is highly criticised in orthodox circles, but there are clinics in America and Germany who advocate it. Below, we also explain DPT. Richard Linchitz, MD, is the founder of the Linchitz Medical Wellness Center ( ) in Glen Cove, NY. In 1998, Dr. Linchitz was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer, despite never having smoked. With a bleak prognosis, he had surgery but developed his own therapy plan. A survivor, 5 years later he was back in his practice, but this time using his own plan to treat others. He uses IPT, supplements and lifestyle changes, just as he did for himself. Linchitz is president of the Integrative Medicine Consortium in America. The key to effective treatment is to not only kill cancer but also make the person healthier. Cancer cells, which contain six to 17 times more insulin receptors than healthy cells, survive by eluding mechanisms to knock them off. IPT selectively targets cancer cells, which need glucose to thrive. We have covered this elsewhere on our website, many times. Cancer cells are inflexible. Not only do they love glucose, it is virtually the only fuel they can use. To satisfy their sweet tooth, they make their own. The waste product of their particular energy system is lactic acid which passes to the liver, is denatured in to glucose, and recirculates round the body to feed them. But this is not enough to satisfy their lust for growth. They need lots of glucose, and have many more ins Continue reading >>

Low-dose Chemotherapy With Insulin (insulin Potentiation Therapy) In Combination With Hormone Therapy For Treatment Of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

Low-dose Chemotherapy With Insulin (insulin Potentiation Therapy) In Combination With Hormone Therapy For Treatment Of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

Low-Dose Chemotherapy with Insulin (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) in Combination with Hormone Therapy for Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Medical Center Integrative Medicine, Deliiska Vodenitza Street, Bl. 330, 1592 Sofia, Bulgaria Received 2012 Jan 20; Accepted 2012 Feb 16. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Purpose. To evaluate the results and quality of life of patients with resistant of castration-resistant tumors previously treated with Insulin-potentiation therapy (IPT) combined with hormone therapy. Materials and methods. Sixteen patients with metastasis prostate tumors after bilateral castration, androgenic blockade, and progression of the disease were observed during the study. The patients were divided into two groups: group A consisting of 8 patients treated with low-dose chemotherapy Epirubicin, Vinblastine, and Cyclophosphamide combined with LHRH agonist and group B consisting of another 8 patients treated with low-dose chemotherapy Docetaxel combined with LHRH agonist. Results. The overall (groups A and B) results concerning PSA after the sixth IPT show partial effect in 8 out of 16 (50%) patients, stabilization in 4 out of 16 (25%), and progression in 4 out of 16 (25%). The median survival for all treated patients is 11,7 months (range 330 months). During the treatment no significant side effects were observed, and no lethal cases occurred. Conclusion. In spite of the small number of the treated patients with castration-resistant prostate tumors, the preliminary results are promising and this gives us hope Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt) - Innovative Medicine

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt) - Innovative Medicine

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT), also known as low dose chemotherapy, is an intravenous alternative cancer treatment. The specialized therapy is a non-diabetic use of the hormone insulin to dramatically improve effectiveness and delivery of standard medications and lower doses of chemotherapy to treat cancer. It is also sometimes used with other treatments for chronic diseases. Discovered in 1926 by Donato Perez Garcia MD, the therapy appears to work, in part, as an efficient drug delivery system across cell membranes and the blood-brain barrier. Each year, tens of millions of people are diagnosed with cancer around the world. In the United States, cancer ranks the second most common cause of death. The traditional cancer treatment includes chemotherapy, radiation and surgery and they are well known for their side effects. In fact, researchers from Public Health England and Cancer Research UK performed a groundbreaking study examining for the first time the numbers of cancer patients who died within 30 days of beginning chemotherapy indicating the treatment, not the cancer, was the cause of death. During standard chemotherapy, where insulin is not used, patients must be given a large dose of chemotherapeutic drugs so that enough will be absorbed by the cells to work effectively. This therapy has a degenerative effect not only on cancer cells, but on healthy cells as well. The immune system suffers while patients experience numerous side effects. With recent understandings of the hypermetabolic activity of the cancer cells, it is now possible to avoid the dose-related side effects of chemotherapy, and at the same time increase the effectiveness and specificity of these agents in killing cancer cells. The key to this is a low dose chemotherapy- IPT. Initially the trea Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy

Insulin Potentiation Therapy

Icon indicating addition, or that the element can be opened. An arrow icon, usually indicating that the containing element can be opened and closed. Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) is an alternative cancer therapy that uses insulin to potentiate the effect of chemotherapy and other medications. This therapy was developed in Mexico by Dr. Donato Perez Garcia in the 1930s and has been used together with other unconventional therapies for many years (1) . Advocates of IPT believe that cancer cells consume more sugar than healthy cells and are therefore more sensitive to insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) (2) (7) . Insulin is also believed to increase the permeability of cell membranes, increasing the intracellular concentration and cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs (1) . According to the theory underlying this therapy, if cancer cells can be activated by exogenous insulin, a reduced dose (up to one-tenth the normal dose) of a chemotherapy drug can provide the same cytotoxic effects with less severe adverse reactions. No clinical trials have been performed to validate these claims. In addition, the pharmacokinetic profiles on concurrent use of insulin and chemotherapy drugs are lacking and it is unclear whether insulin also potentiates toxic effects of chemotherapy on healthy cells. Although proponents cite anecdotal case reports suggesting that IPT may be effective, there are no data comparing the efficacy of IPT to conventional chemotherapy. Most of the medications used in this therapy, such as insulin and other chemotherapy drugs, are FDA-approved but IPT clinics administer them off-label.Further, some clinics that administer IPT are not operated or staffed by oncologists. Side effects of IPT include hypoglycemic reaction. A systematic review of 21 studi Continue reading >>

More On Iptld Therapy

More On Iptld Therapy

More on Insulin Potentiation Targeted LowDose (IPTLD) Therapy? Targeted low dose chemotherapy using Insulin as a biologic response modifier is a therapy known asInsulin Potentiation Targeted LowDose therapy (IPTLD). It is an innovative cancer treatment regime that allows for the use of chemotherapy drugs selected according to accepted oncological practice. These drugs are delivered at much lower doses than what is accepted as the standard dose. The effectiveness of the lower dose is based upon physiologic evidence and clinical experience to be enhanced by using insulin to transport the chemotherapy drugs across the cell membrane into cancer cells. The insulin (which may be considered an off-label use) acts to target the chemotherapy drugs to the cancer cells only. (Note: Off label use of approved drugs is addressed in the Physicians Desk Reference. It is permissible under FDA law. Insulin has a very long history of safety). Clinical experience also strongly suggests that this protocol minimizes the side-effects associated with chemotherapy. The most notable impact reported by patients is an improvement in quality of life. IPTLD practitioners use approximately 1/10th 1/4th the dose of conventional chemotherapy drugs. Additionally, clinical experience and some studies suggest that the use of insulin as a biological response modifier allows this fractionated dose to yield clinically significant tumor responses. Note: For more detailed information about how IPTLD works go to www.iptforcancer.com . IPTLD more selectively targets cancer cells while affecting relatively few healthy cells. Patients do not suffer the severe side effects of chemotherapy, such as hair loss, fatigue and depression. Thus the patients quality of life is significantly improved. Gentle treatment combi Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Treating Patients, Not Cancer:No one diagnosis awakens more fear in the patient than to hear, you have cancer. It is even called the big C, because saying the whole world is unmentionable. This is because the uncertainty to cure seems so remote, and the traditional course of treatment often requires surgery, followed by radiation and then a nightmare course of chemotherapy. At our Clearwater clinic, we work with cancer patients , whether they are following the traditional chemotherapy route to support their immune systems or are embracing more complete natural options. What isInsulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)? IPT stands for Insulin Potentiation Therapy. Some decades ago it was discovered that cancer cells were sugar hungry and they would take up a lot more chemotherapy medication if they were given insulin first. Based on this idea, IPT was born. Give insulin first, then give a reduced dose of chemo while at the same time strengthening the patients immune system with IV and oral nutritional protocols and assist them in detoxifying their bodies of harmful environmental toxins. Why You Should ConsiderInsulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) When a person is diagnosed with cancer it can be frightening because of the uncertainty of recovery and the difficulty of a treatment regimen that may require surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. At LifeWorks our approach is different. We maximize the potential for recovery by optimizing the diet and lifestyle, enhancing the immune system with IV and oral nutritional supplementation, supporting detoxification, and utilizing low dose Insulin Potentiated Chemotherapy to reduce the tumor burden. We believe this approach gives patients who want a holistic approach to overcoming their cancer a viable option and an intelligent choice. Read a pa Continue reading >>

Ipt/iptld Treatment | Best Answer For Cancer Foundation

Ipt/iptld Treatment | Best Answer For Cancer Foundation

IPTLD: Targeting the Cancer Cells Not the Patient! Insulin Potentiation Targeted Low Dose therapy (IPTLD) is a procedure for targeting chemotherapeutic drugs directly to cancer cells, making the drugs tougher on the disease and easier on the rest of the body. Conventional chemotherapy tends to flood the body with drugs so enough will enter the cancer cells to kill them. Each of our trillions of cells has a membrane, an outer skin, that protects it from toxins. Standard chemotherapy must be given in large enough quantities to force penetration through that membrane. IPTLD, however, penetrates easily through the cell membrane because it goes in hand-in-hand with sugar (glucose). Cancer cells, unlike healthy cells, need lots of glucose for fuel. Without it, they die. The membrane of a cancer cell is designed to take in a lot more glucose than healthy cells. In medical parlance we say cancer cells are equipped with many more insulin receptors. So, what if we pair a small dose of chemo drugs with the glucose? Yes, the cancer cell takes in the chemotherapy drugs in its effort to get at the sugar. Using insulin allows us to differentiate the cancer cells from the normal cells. This is a significant advantage. When a doctor administers IPTLD, the first thing he or she does is to gently lower the patients blood sugar level with insulin, the same natural hormone diabetics use. The cancer cells, because they must have sugar to live, become ravenous and open thoseinsulin receptors wide to get at whatever they can find in the blood streams diminishing supply. When the blood sugar level has dropped enough, the doctor will administer a low dose of chemotherapy. The cancer cells take it in. The doctor then administers glucose which brings the patients blood sugar level back up to norm Continue reading >>

Cancer Active

Cancer Active

Thank you for helping us to raise a fantastic 19,708 for our new CANCERactive website which will be launched in 2018 Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) uses a cancer cells need for sugar, and thus insulin receptors, to create a feeding frenzy, at which point low doses of chemotherapy can more easily kill off the cancer. As you would expect, the therapy is highly criticised in orthodox circles, but there are clinics in America and Germany who advocate it. Below, we also explain DPT. Richard Linchitz, MD, is the founder of the Linchitz Medical Wellness Center ( ) in Glen Cove, NY. In 1998, Dr. Linchitz was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer, despite never having smoked. With a bleak prognosis, he had surgery but developed his own therapy plan. A survivor, 5 years later he was back in his practice, but this time using his own plan to treat others. He uses IPT, supplements and lifestyle changes, just as he did for himself. Linchitz is president of the Integrative Medicine Consortium in America. The key to effective treatment is to not only kill cancer but also make the person healthier. Cancer cells, which contain six to 17 times more insulin receptors than healthy cells, survive by eluding mechanisms to knock them off. IPT selectively targets cancer cells, which need glucose to thrive. We have covered this elsewhere on our website, many times. Cancer cells are inflexible. Not only do they love glucose, it is virtually the only fuel they can use. To satisfy their sweet tooth, they make their own. The waste product of their particular energy system is lactic acid which passes to the liver, is denatured in to glucose, and recirculates round the body to feed them. But this is not enough to satisfy their lust for growth. They need lots of glucose, and have many more ins Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Cancer Therapy (ipt) | Oasis Of Hope

Insulin Potentiation Cancer Therapy (ipt) | Oasis Of Hope

Insulin potentiation chemotherapy (IPT) at Oasis of Hope Also known as low dose chemotherapy , is one of the safest and most innovative approaches to treating cancer. It is a kinder, gentler way to fight cancer effectively, including particularly aggressive cancers such as lung cancer and colon cancer, but is also effective on a wide variety of cancer types. This alternative treatment has almost none of the side effects such as nausea, radical hair loss , liver damage, and DNA distortion that we see routinely with standard chemotherapy. The key to IPT as a cancer cure is the bodys own hormone insulin. Insulin manages the delivery of glucose across cell membranes into the cells. Cancer cells have 10-20 times more insulin receptors on their surface than normal cells. When insulin is released into the bloodstream by the pancreas in response to a meal, the insulin attaches to these receptors on the surface of the cell and, like a key fitting into a lock, opens channels in the cell wall to allow nutrients to go into the cell. Because cancer cells have more of these receptors, they compete for food better than normal cells. In this way, cancer cells thrive and normal cells are compromised. You may have heard the expression, sugar feeds cancer. Indeed it does. Yet at the same time, sugar is the Achilles heel of cancer. PET scans for example find cancer by looking at the sugar uptake. The radioactive agent is mixed with sugar water and, because cancer cells take up much more sugar than normal cells, the radioactive agent congregates in the cancer cells. The resulting picture will indicate enhanced uptake and a mass where the cancer is. We use that extreme need for sugar to our advantage with IPT when treating cancer. But instead of using a radioactive agent along with the suga Continue reading >>

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (ipt)

Providing Help and Support When you Need it Most No severe disease or chronic illnesscan exist in an individual with an intact and fully functional immune system! Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT) is a therapeutic procedure which utilizes low doses of conventional chemotherapeutic agents on a more frequent schedule to reduce or eliminate the toxic side effects of the drugs. It maintains the effectiveness of the drug by potentiating its anti-cancer activity with the use of insulin. A historical and theoretical discussion of IPT and how it works is covered below. The major limitation of chemotherapy is its extreme toxic effect on all bodily functions, particularly the blood, digestive and immune systems. It comes down to whether we can kill the cancer without killing the patient. Lowering the overall toxicity of the drug while continuing to kill the cancer cells is the primary goal of IPT. Patients who do not become nauseous and whose digestive system continues to function have better nutrition and lose less weight while undergoing treatment. Keeping a higher red blood cell count contributes to better health, especially for those patients with respiratory complications. Maintaining a functioning immune system helps fight off infectious diseases. However, this can become a problem following conventional chemotherapy. Often overlooked is a major potential of IPT and its most important advantage the ability to aggressively pursue immune therapy while simultaneously using chemotherapy, a combined treatment which is usually not possible with the standard high-dose chemotherapy approach. Immune therapy is frequently ignored because chemotherapy is considered the first line of treatment; the result is a highly suppressed immune system which consequently cannot respond to drugs Continue reading >>

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