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Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes Risk Factors For Injection Omission

[full Text] Adherence To Insulin Treatment In Insulin-nave Type 2 Diabetic P | Ppa

[full Text] Adherence To Insulin Treatment In Insulin-nave Type 2 Diabetic P | Ppa

Editor who approved publication: Dr Johnny Chen Dilek Gogas Yavuz, Sevim Ozcan, Oguzhan Deyneli Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey Objective: We aimed to evaluate adherence to insulin treatment in terms of treatment persistence and daily adherence to insulin injections among insulin-nave type 2 diabetic patients initiating insulin therapy with basal (long acting), basal-bolus, and premixed insulin regimens in a tertiary endocrinology outpatient clinic. Methods: A total of 433 (mean age of 55.513.0 years; 52.4% females) insulin-nave type 2 diabetic patients initiated on insulin therapy were included in this questionnaire-based phone interview survey at the sixth month of therapy. Via the telephone interview questions, patients were required to provide information about persistence to insulin treatment, self-reported blood glucose values, and side effects; data on demographics and diabetes characteristics were obtained from medical records. Results: Self-reported treatment withdrawal occurred in 20.1% patients, while 20.3% patients were nonadherent to daily insulin. Negative beliefs about insulin therapy (24.1%) and forgetting injections (40.9%) were the most common reasons for treatment withdrawal and dose skipping, respectively. Younger age (49.515.0 vs 56.412.0 years) (P=0.001) and shorter duration of diabetes (4.84.3 vs 8.86.3 years) (P=0.0008) and treatment duration (5.22.4 vs 10.72.4 months) (P=0.0001) were noted, respectively, in discontinuers vs continuers. Basal bolus was the most commonly prescribed insulin regimen (51.0%), while associated with higher likelihood of skipping a dose than regular use (61.3% vs. 46.0%, P=0.04). Conclusions: Persistence to insulin therapy was poorer than anticipated b Continue reading >>

Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission

Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission

Insulin adherence in patients with diabetes: Risk factors for injection omission Please citeDiab. (2014ARTICLE IN PRESSPCD-379; No. of Pages 8p r i m a r y c a r e d i a b e t e s x x x ( 2 0 1 4 ) xxxxxxContents lists available at ScienceDirectPrimary Care Diabetesj o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : h t t p : / / w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / p c dOriginal researchInsulin adherence in patients with diabetes: RiskfactorShadi FaMostafaa DepartmenSciences, Isfb Departmenc EndocrinolUniversity od Growth anSciences, Tehe Departmenf Departmena r t i c Article historReceived 8 JReceived in 9 March 201Accepted 13Available onKeywords:AdherenceDiabetes meInsulinBarrier CorresponE-mail athis article in press as: S. Farsaei, et al., Insulin adherence in patients with diabetes: Risk factors for injection omission, Prim. Care), for injection omissionrsaeia, Mania Radfarb,c,, Zahra Heydari c, Farzaneh Abbasi c,d, Qorbanie,ft of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Isfahan University of Medicalahan, Irant of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iranogy and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehranf Medical Sciences, Tehran, Irand Development Research Center, Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran University of Medicalran, Irant of Public Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Irant of Epidemiology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iranl e i n f oy:uly 2013revised form4 March 2014line xxxllitusa b s t r a c tAims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to insulin therapy in patientswith diabetes. The underlying factors affecting insulin injection omission among patientswith type 1 or 2 diabetes were also in Continue reading >>

Advances In Insulin Injection Research Influences Patient Adherence

Advances In Insulin Injection Research Influences Patient Adherence

Advances in Insulin Injection Research Influences Patient Adherence US Endocrinology, 2013;9(2):1148 DOI: Insulin formulations and injection devices have improved dramatically since the first insulin injection was given in 1922. Adherence to insulin therapy, however, is estimated at 6264 % despite research indicating that good glycemic control improves patient outcomes. The challenge is to improve the rates of adherence and to intensify or progress insulin therapy as needed. Changes in insulin delivery devices, especially innovations in needle technology in combination with education and support, have the potential to improve the comfort of insulin injections and encourage patients to adhere to their insulin regimens. Keywords: Insulin pen needles, adherence to insulin therapy, psychological insulin resistance, skin thickness Disclosure: Ronnie Aronson, MD, has received honoraria and research grants from Becton Dickinson (BD), as well as from Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi. Timothy Bailey, MD, has been a consultant for Bayer, BD, Lifescan, Medtronic, Novo Nordisk, Roche, and Sanofi, has received speaking honoraria from Novo Nordisk, and has received research support from Abbott, Animas, Bayer, BD, Boehringer Ingelheim, Cebix, Bristol Myers Squibb, Dexcom, GlaxoSmithKline, Halozyme, Insulet, Lifescan, Lilly, Mannkind, Medtronic, Merck, Novo Nordisk, Orexigen, Resmed, Sanofi, Tandem, and Versartis. Laurence Hirsch, MD, and Rita Saltiel-Berzin, RN, MPH, CDE, are employees of BD. Received: October 04, 2013 Accepted November 11, 2013 Correspondence: Ronnie Aronson, MD, LMC Diabetes & Endocrinology, Suite 106, 1929 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M4G 3E8. E: [email protected] Support: The publication of this article was supported by Becton Dickinson. The views a Continue reading >>

Factors Associated With Injection Omission/non-adherence In The Global Attitudes Of Patients And Physicians In Insulin Therapy Study.

Factors Associated With Injection Omission/non-adherence In The Global Attitudes Of Patients And Physicians In Insulin Therapy Study.

To examine factors associated with insulin injection omission/non-adherence on a global basis.Telephone survey of 1530 insulin-treated adults with self-reported diabetes (110 type 1 and 1420 type 2) in China, France, Japan, Germany, Spain, Turkey, UK or USA. Participants had a mean age of 60 years, 15 years duration of diabetes and 9 years duration of insulin treatment. Regression analysis assessed the independent associations (p < 0.05) of country, participant characteristics and treatment-related beliefs/perceptions with number of days in the past month that an insulin injection was missed or not taken as prescribed.One third (35%) of respondents reported one or more days (mean: 3 days) of insulin omission/non-adherence. Insulin omission/non-adherence differed widely across countries (range = 20-44%); differences in days of insulin omission/non-adherence were maintained after adjustment for other risk factors. Most risk factors had similar relationships with insulin omission/non-adherence across countries (few interactions with country). Insulin omission/non-adherence was more frequent among respondents who were male, younger, had type 2 diabetes or more frequent hypoglycaemia, were less successful with other treatment tasks, regarded insulin adherence as less important, had more practical/logistical barriers and difficulties with insulin adherence, were concerned that insulin treatment required lifestyle changes or were dissatisfied with the flexibility of injection timing.The results of this large-scale study suggest that insulin omission/non-adherence is common and associated with several modifiable risk factors (including practical barriers, injection difficulties, lifestyle burden and regimen inflexibility). Additional efforts to address these risk factors might Continue reading >>

Details And Download Full Text Pdf: Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission.

Details And Download Full Text Pdf: Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission.

Prim Care Diabetes 2014 Dec 8;8(4):338-45. Epub 2014 Apr 8. Department of Public Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran; Department of Epidemiology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to insulin therapy in patients with diabetes. The underlying factors affecting insulin injection omission among patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes were also investigated. Methods: This cross-sectional study has been conducted on 507 patients with diabetes. Adherence to insulin therapy was measured by the 8-Item Moriskey Medication Adherence Scale (MMS) and the autocompliance method. Furthermore, socio-demographic, disease and injection-related barriers to insulin injection were assessed. Results: Based on the Morisky Green test, 14.3% and 28.8% of patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes respectively had low adherence to insulin therapy. However, almost all patients were adherent according to the autocompliance method. Different factors showed a significant association with insulin compliance in both groups. Conclusions: The current study suggests acceptable adherence to insulin therapy among patients with type 1, and poor adherence in patients with type 2, diabetes. Our findings regarding barriers with significant effect on insulin adherence may be useful to identify patients at risk for low compliance, and to guide the design of proper strategies to improve adherence and the consequential clinical outcomes. ( Please be advised that this article is hosted on an external website not affiliated with PubFacts.com) Continue reading >>

Correlates Of Insulin Injection Omission

Correlates Of Insulin Injection Omission

Abstract OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess factors associated with patient frequency of intentionally skipping insulin injections. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were obtained through an Internet survey of 502 U.S. adults self-identified as taking insulin by injection to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Multiple regression analysis assessed independent associations of various demographic, disease, and injection-specific factors with insulin omission. RESULTS Intentional insulin omission was reported by more than half of respondents; regular omission was reported by 20%. Significant independent risk factors for insulin omission were younger age, lower income and higher education, type 2 diabetes, not following a healthy diet, taking more daily injections, interference of injections with daily activities, and injection pain and embarrassment. Risk factors differed between type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients, with diet nonadherence more prominent in type 1 diabetes and age, education, income, pain, and embarrassment more prominent in type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Whereas most patients did not report regular intentional omission of insulin injections, a substantial number did. Our findings suggest that it is important to identify patients who intentionally omit insulin and be aware of the potential risk factors identified here. For patients who report injection-related problems (interference with daily activities, injection pain, and embarrassment), providers should consider recommending strategies and tools for addressing these problems to increase adherence to prescribed insulin regimens. This could improve clinical outcomes. More than 25% of people with diabetes take insulin (1). The American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Stud Continue reading >>

Type 2.0 | Why Do Patients Intentionally Skip Insulin Injections?

Type 2.0 | Why Do Patients Intentionally Skip Insulin Injections?

Why do patients intentionally skip insulin injections? This internet survey of adults in the United States using insulin to treat type 1 (n=114) or type 2 (n=388) diabetes identified factors associated with patients intentionally skipping insulin injections. Peyrot M, Rubin RR, Kruger DF, Travis L. Correlates of insulin injection omission. Diabetes Care. 2010;33:240–245. Intentional omission of insulin injections was common 57% of all respondents had skipped insulin injections they knew they should take ~20% of all respondents “sometimes” or “often” skipped insulin injections Even though concern about hypoglycemia was high in the study population, it did not predict intentional omission of insulin injections Selected profile results for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) Planning daily activities around insulin injections Interference with activities of daily living* Dissatisfaction with time needed for injection† Dissatisfaction with injection ease of use† Data are % or means ± SD, unless otherwise stated. * 1 = not at all, 2 = a little, 3 = a moderate amount, 4 = a great deal. † 1 = very satisfied, 2 = satisfied, 3 = somewhat satisfied, 4 = not at all satisfied. ‡ 1 = strongly disagree, 2 = somewhat disagree, 3 = somewhat agree, 4 = strongly agree. § 1 = never, 2 = rarely, 3 = sometimes, 4 = often. The majority (71%) of patients with T2D use a syringe (needle) to inject insulin Most T2D patients (58%) changed their needle with each injection T2D patients took an average of 2.5 injections per day Factors affecting intentional insulin omission Risk factors differed between T1D and T2D patients Diet nonadherence was more prominent in type 1 diabetes Age, education, income, pain and embarrassment were more prominent in T2D Respondents significantly l Continue reading >>

Most Cited Primary Care Diabetes Articles

Most Cited Primary Care Diabetes Articles

Most Cited Primary Care Diabetes Articles The most cited articles published since 2013, extracted from Scopus . Volume 7, Issue 3, October 2013, Pages 177-186 Michael P. Carson | Matthew I. Frank | Erin Keely Volume 8, Issue 4, January 2014, Pages 275-285 Mohsen Saffari | Ghader Ghanizadeh | Harold G. Koenig Volume 7, Issue 2, July 2013, Pages 111-118 Reza Negarandeh | Hassan Mahmoodi | Hayedeh Noktehdan | Ramin Heshmat | Elham Shakibazadeh Volume 7, Issue 1, April 2013, Pages 1-10 Norbert Hermanns | Salvatore Caputo | Grzegorz Dzida | Kamlesh Khunti | Luigi F. Meneghini | Frank Snoek Volume 8, Issue 3, January 2014, Pages 231-238 L. Bennet | L. Groop | U. Lindblad | C. D. Agardh | P. W. Franks Volume 7, Issue 2, July 2013, Pages 159-165 Kamlesh Khunti | Harriet Fisher | Sanjoy Paul | Mohammad Iqbal | Melanie J. Davies | A. Niroshan Siriwardena Volume 8, Issue 4, January 2014, Pages 338-345 Shadi Farsaei | Mania Radfar | Zahra Heydari | Farzaneh Abbasi | Mostafa Qorbani Volume 7, Issue 4, January 2013, Pages 249-259 Volume 7, Issue 3, October 2013, Pages 229-233 Volume 7, Issue 1, April 2013, Pages 45-50 Cynthia Formosa | Alfred Gatt | Nachiappan Chockalingam Volume 7, Issue 3, October 2013, Pages 199-206 Hashim Mohamed | Badriya Al-Lenjawi | Paul Amuna | Francis Zotor | Hisham Elmahdi Volume 8, Issue 2, January 2014, Pages 111-117 Guillermo Dieuzeide | Lee Ming Chuang | Abdulrahman Almaghamsi | Alexey Zilov | Jian Wen Chen | Fernando J. Lavalle-Gonzlez Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2015, Pages 60-67 Xiao Wei Zhu | Fei Yan Deng | Shu Feng Lei Volume 8, Issue 1, January 2014, Pages 3-11 Volume 8, Issue 2, January 2014, Pages 127-131 Karel Kostev | Franz Werner Dippel | Wolfgang Rathmann Volume 8, Issue 3, January 2014, Pages 250-255 Karel Kostev | Achim Jockwig | Alexander Continue reading >>

Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission - Sciencedirect

Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission - Sciencedirect

Volume 8, Issue 4 , December 2014, Pages 338-345 Insulin adherence in patients with diabetes: Risk factors for injection omission Author links open overlay panel ShadiFarsaeia ManiaRadfarbc The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to insulin therapy in patients with diabetes. The underlying factors affecting insulin injection omission among patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes were also investigated. This cross-sectional study has been conducted on 507 patients with diabetes. Adherence to insulin therapy was measured by the 8-Item Moriskey Medication Adherence Scale (MMS) and the autocompliance method. Furthermore, socio-demographic, disease and injection-related barriers to insulin injection were assessed. Based on the Morisky Green test, 14.3% and 28.8% of patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes respectively had low adherence to insulin therapy. However, almost all patients were adherent according to the autocompliance method. Different factors showed a significant association with insulin compliance in both groups. The current study suggests acceptable adherence to insulin therapy among patients with type 1, and poor adherence in patients with type 2, diabetes. Our findings regarding barriers with significant effect on insulin adherence may be useful to identify patients at risk for low compliance, and to guide the design of proper strategies to improve adherence and the consequential clinical outcomes. Continue reading >>

Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission.

Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission.

Prim Care Diabetes. 2014 Dec;8(4):338-45. doi: 10.1016/j.pcd.2014.03.001. Epub 2014 Apr 8. Insulin adherence in patients with diabetes: risk factors for injection omission. Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: [email protected] Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Growth and Development Research Center, Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Department of Public Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran; Department of Epidemiology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to insulin therapy in patients with diabetes. The underlying factors affecting insulin injection omission among patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes were also investigated. This cross-sectional study has been conducted on 507 patients with diabetes. Adherence to insulin therapy was measured by the 8-Item Moriskey Medication Adherence Scale (MMS) and the autocompliance method. Furthermore, socio-demographic, disease and injection-related barriers to insulin injection were assessed. Based on the Morisky Green test, 14.3% and 28.8% of pa Continue reading >>

Improving Insulin Adherence In Diabetes Care

Improving Insulin Adherence In Diabetes Care

Despite the benefits of insulin therapy, many people with diabetes don’t adhere to treatment. Some avoid insulin therapy or refuse to start it. A recent study found more than a third of the roughly 25 million Americans with diabetes don’t take insulin as prescribed and 20% intentionally skip some doses, which can lead to serious health risks. A study of nurses and physicians found nurses can play a more important role in improving insulin adherence. As nurses, we’re well positioned to help patients improve adherence because we play a key part in patient education, spend proportionately more time with patients than do other healthcare providers, and may be more familiar with a patient’s health history. Although time constraints may pose a challenge for nurses, if we ask the right questions during outpatient visits and hospital stays and address patient concerns, we can help motivate patients to take control of diabetes and adhere to insulin therapy over the long term. Using the strategies described in this article, you can help patients better understand and address the challenges of insulin therapy. Patients who receive more comprehensive information about their care are better able to monitor and manage their condition at home. Tailor the treatment plan When talking with patients, ask about their lifestyle and concerns about treatment. Then work with the healthcare provider who manages their insulin to develop a treatment plan customized to each patient’s needs and abilities. Communication is especially crucial before and during initiation of insulin therapy. But you also should continue to communicate with patients after treatment begins or when it’s modified. In many cases, patients don’t ask for help or discuss concerns related to self-care while in th Continue reading >>

Identifying And Addressing Barriers To Insulin Acceptance And Adherence In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Identifying And Addressing Barriers To Insulin Acceptance And Adherence In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Progressive hyperglycemia is a characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that poses a challenge to maintaining optimal glycemic control. Achieving glycemic control early in the course of disease can minimize or prevent serious complications. Most patients with T2DM eventually require insulin replacement therapy to attain and preserve satisfactory glucose control. For decades, the use of insulin to address the primary defect of T2DM has been a cornerstone of diabetes therapy. Insulin is indicated for patients with T2DM presenting with clinically significant hyperglycemia, and it is mandatory for patients exhibiting signs of catabolism. Insulin should be considered for patients in whom hyperglycemia persists despite attempts to control the condition through diet and exercise modifications and the use of noninsulin therapies. Many physicians delay initiation of insulin until absolutely necessary, sometimes overestimating patient concerns about its use. Modern insulin analogs, treatment regimens, and delivery devices make insulin more user friendly, and physicians can promote patient acceptance of insulin by reviewing the benefits of controlled glycated hemoglobin levels and addressing patient concerns. Approximately 26 million Americans were living with diabetes in 2010.1 Data from a 2012 report2 indicated a substantial increase in the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes mellitus throughout the 50 states, Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico during a 16-year period (1995-2010), with the age-adjusted prevalence increasing by more than 50% in most states and by 100% or greater in 18 states. Figure 13 shows the areas of the United States that had the highest concentrations of diagnosed diabetes in 2009, whereas Figure 2 presents the lifetime risks of developing diabetes.4 In Continue reading >>

Ecase Challenge

Ecase Challenge

Diabetes Management: Adherence to Injectable Antihyperglycemic Agents in Patients with T2DM Diabetes, as a chronic illness, requires continuing medical care and ongoing patient self-management education and support to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk oflong-term complications.1 Patients must actively participate in the self-management of diabetesfor it to be successful,1 and medication adherence is a critical precept of diabetes self-management. As the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the complexity of therapeutic regimens increases, the role of pharmacists in educating patients about treatment benefits, dosage flexibility, and avoiding side effects is critical and may optimize care by increasing the likelihood of treatment adherence. In addition, pharmacists are in a unique position to assess which patients are not taking medications as prescribed and can therefore determine the most effective methods to promote adherence.2,3 Insulin and noninsulin injectable therapy (GLP-1 receptor agonists [GLP-1 RAs]) play an increasingly important role in the management of T2DM. In the past, patients and clinicians had valid concerns about the difficulty of injections and concerns about hypoglycemia and weight gain associated with insulin. However, with the advent of injection delivery devices (pens), insulin analogs with more physiologic profiles, GLP-1 RAs with low risks of hypoglycemia and the benefit of potential weight loss, these pharmacological concerns have greatly diminished. Understanding patient concerns, and communicating benefits of good glycemic control, treatment options, and ways to minimize adverse effects in ways that are meaningful to specific patients remain challenging. Pharmacists, as drug experts, are now increasingly learn Continue reading >>

Patients Often Skip Insulin Doses Intentionally

Patients Often Skip Insulin Doses Intentionally

Patients Often Skip Insulin Doses Intentionally Major Finding: A majority (57%) of adults taking insulin for diabetes said they intentionally skipped an insulin injection occasionally, and 20% did so regularly. Data Source: Online survey with 502 participants in a sample weighted to be representative of insulin-using U.S. adults with diabetes. Disclosures: Patton Medical Devices, which makes an insulin injection device, funded the study. Some of the investigators own stock in and have been advisers to the company. Most adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes intentionally skip insulin injections, and 20% skip them regularly, according to an online survey of 502 diabetic adults. The study is one of the first to identify factors that were associated with a greater likelihood of purposefully omitting insulin shots at least occasionally, as 57% of respondents reported doing. The 388 respondents with type 2 diabetes were more likely to report intentional omissions of insulin, compared with the 114 with type 1 diabetes, according to the report (Diabetes Care 2010;33:240-5). Respondents who were more likely to skip insulin injections were younger, were students, had lower household incomes, had higher education levels, or did not eat a healthy diet. Skipping insulin also was more likely among respondents who either had to take more daily injections, said the injections interfered with daily activities, or reported pain or embarrassment from the injections. Physicians should work with patients to discover their issues around injecting insulin and give them the information or tools they need to overcome some of these barriers, suggested Mark Peyrot, Ph.D., of the department of sociology, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, and his associates. Insulin pens, finer-gauge needles, Continue reading >>

Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission | Shadi Farsaei - Academia.edu

Insulin Adherence In Patients With Diabetes: Risk Factors For Injection Omission | Shadi Farsaei - Academia.edu

Insulin adherence in patients with diabetes: Risk factors for injection omission PCD-379; No. of Pages 8 ARTICLE IN PRESS p r i m a r y c a r e d i a b e t e s x x x ( 2 0 1 4 ) xxxxxx Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Primary Care Diabetes journal homepage: researchInsulin adherence in patients with diabetes: Riskfactors for injection omissionShadi Farsaei a , Mania Radfar b,c, , Zahra Heydari c , Farzaneh Abbasi c,d ,Mostafa Qorbani e,fa Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Isfahan University of MedicalSciences, Isfahan, Iranb Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iranc Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, TehranUniversity of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Irand Growth and Development Research Center, Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran University of MedicalSciences, Tehran, Irane Department of Public Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iranf Department of Epidemiology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Irana r t i c l e i n f o a b s t r a c tArticle history: Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to insulin therapy in patientsReceived 8 July 2013 with diabetes. The underlying factors affecting insulin injection omission among patientsReceived in revised form with type 1 or 2 diabetes were also investigated.9 March 2014 Methods: This cross-sectional study has been conducted on 507 patients with diabetes.Accepted 13 March 2014 Adherence to insulin therapy was measured by the 8-Item Moriskey Medication AdherenceAvailable online xxx Scale (MMS) and the autocompliance method. Furthermore, socio-demographic, disease and injection-related barriers to i Continue reading >>

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