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Insulet Artificial Pancreas

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

An insulin pump is a medical device used for the administration of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. The device configuration may vary depending on design. A traditional pump includes: the pump (including controls, processing module, and batteries) a disposable reservoir for insulin (inside the pump) a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion (under the skin) and a tubing system to interface the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Other configurations are possible. For instance, more recent models may include disposable or semi-disposable designs for the pumping mechanism and may eliminate tubing from the infusion set. An insulin pump is an alternative to multiple daily injections of insulin by insulin syringes or an insulin pen and allows for intensive insulin therapy when used in conjunction with blood glucose monitoring and carb counting. Medical uses[edit] Advantages[edit] Users report better quality of life (QOL) compared to using other devices for administering insulin. The improvement in QOL is reported in type 1 and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes subjects on pumps.[1] The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal needs offers relative freedom from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to control blood sugar with slow-acting insulin.[citation needed] Programmable basal rates allow for scheduled insulin deliveries of varying amounts at different times of the day. This is especially useful in controlling events such as the dawn phenomenon resulting in less low blood sugar during the night.[2] Many users feel that bolusing insulin from a pump is more convenient and discreet than injection.[2][3] Insulin pumps make it possible to deliver more pre Continue reading >>

Omnipod Artificial Pancreas System Clinical Trial

Omnipod Artificial Pancreas System Clinical Trial

OmniPod Artificial Pancreas System Clinical Trial OmniPod Artificial Pancreas System Clinical Trial If you are interested in participating in a study involving the use of the OmniPod Horizon Hybrid Closed Loop System, you might want to check out ClinicalTrials.gov to see if you qualify. This fall, Insulet, the maker of the OmniPod system, announced that the first patient completed the feasibility study of the Omnipod Horizon Automated Glucose Control System. The use of a personal Model Predictive Control algorithm with the Omnipod platform will be evaluated in the full study using 20 adults who have Type 1 diabetes. This will occur in a clinical research center setting so data can be collected and utilized to fine-tune the algorithm in later studies, leading up to submission to the FDA. Insulet acquired the UC Santa Barbara Artificial Pancreas algorithm. Jordan Pinsker, MD is a senior research physician at William Sansum Diabetes Center. Along with colleagues, he played a major role in the development of this algorithm. He and his colleagues will be participating in Insulets artificial pancreas clinical trials. They will contribute to the clinical and development pathway as Insulet works toward bringing this technology to a commercially available product. The Omnipod Horizon System would be one integrated system comprised of an on-body Omnipod pump, a Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM), a modified version of Insulets hand-held controller, and an advanced security system. The algorithm looks toward future blood glucose (BG) levels, adjusting insulin delivery to optimize BG outcomes for the user. It is expected to improve both clinical outcomes and quality of life for users. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Societies Aim To Gain Medicare Coverage For Cgms, Omnipod

Diabetes Societies Aim To Gain Medicare Coverage For Cgms, Omnipod

Diabetes Societies Aim to Gain Medicare Coverage for CGMs, OmniPod Ongoing efforts from several fronts are aimed at convincing the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to change its coverage plans for Medicare, which currently exclude several diabetes technologies that don't fit the agency's narrowly defined categories for reimbursement. Although most private insurers now cover personal-use continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) and the insulin-delivery device OmniPod (Insulet Corporation) for patients who meet certain clinical criteria, Medicare doesn't. And neither do about 20 state Medicaid programs that follow Medicare's lead. Thus, Medicaid patients in those states can't get these devices, while those who have been using them for long periods of time both CGMs and OmniPod have been on the US market for over a decade are forced to give them up or pay out of pocket for the supplies when they age into Medicare. "[CMS officials] just want to be within the bounds of the law. But as a clinician I deal with all these headaches. When patients turn 65 they lose the OmniPod and CGM," George Grunberger, MD, head of the Grunberger Diabetes Institute, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and immediate past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), explained to Medscape Medical News. Issue Relates to Definition of "Durable Medical Equipment" With both devices, the problem relates to the definition of "durable medical equipment," which applies solely to the active part of devices under Medicare Part B. In the case of CGMs, the "active" part the sensor inserted beneath the skin is discarded after being worn for 6 or 7 days (CGMs from Medtronic and Dexcom, respectively). Both systems also include battery-powered transmitters either rechargeable ( Continue reading >>

The Future Of Diabetes: My 3 Weeks On A Bionic Pancreas

The Future Of Diabetes: My 3 Weeks On A Bionic Pancreas

The Future of Diabetes: My 3 Weeks on a Bionic Pancreas First, whats the status of the race towards an artificial pancreas? Ive been quietly watching from the sidelines for nearly the past two years as work on artificial pancreas algorithms and hardware has gotten much closer to becoming reality. Excitingly, we are now just under two years from having a wide selection of artificial pancreas options on the market! (pending FDA approval of course) The soonest looks like it will be Medtronics MiniMed 670G hybrid closed-loop system , which is currently in pivotal trials (pivotal or Phase 3 trials are the phase required by the FDA before devices can be marketed and sold to the public), with a potential launch in April 2017. Following closely is TypeZeros inControl system . Tandem , Insulet (of OmniPod fame and the only tubeless artificial pancreas trial device Im aware of), Bigfoot Biomedical and Beta Bionics are all aiming for pivotal trials in 2017 and would therefore potentially launch in 2018. Short of a cure, the release of these products is something Ive dreamed about for years. No longer having to check my blood sugar 8 to 12 times per day. No longer having to precisely measure the carbohydrate content of my food. No longer having to painstakingly calculate the correct carb:insulin ratio. And no longer having to worry as much about what I eat in general and constantly have to think about diabetes. I was lucky to hear about a study going on at Stanford for the artificial pancreas about 6 months ago and ended up taking part in a trial for the Beta Bionics version. Thats the same Beta Bionics, led by Ed Damiano, which just secured $5M for the planned 2017 pivotal trial to take their iLet Bionic Pancreas to market. If you dont know the Beta Bionics story, Ed gave an exce Continue reading >>

Quest For The Artificial Pancreas

Quest For The Artificial Pancreas

It is the closest thing to an artificial pancreas the diabetes community has ever seen and the first automated insulin system to be approved by the FDA: the Medtronic MiniMed 670G hybrid closed-loop system. Capable of automatically detecting and preventing dangerous high and low glucose levels, Medtronic’s new insulin system is being hailed as a monumental breakthrough for people with type 1 diabetes. “This first-of-its-kind technology can provide people with type 1 diabetes greater freedom to live their lives without having to consistently and manually monitor baseline glucose levels and administer insulin,” Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in an agency news release. Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G uses a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to track blood glucose levels and an insulin pump to administer insulin. While both of these devices have been around for years, it has traditionally fallen on the user to calculate how much insulin to dose based on blood glucose readings from the CGM. The Medtronic MiniMed 670G introduces a new component to diabetes management that the FDA has long been cautious about: allowing computer software to handle insulin delivery. Too much or too little insulin can have serious and potentially fatal consequences. Users are still required to enter mealtime carbs and periodically calibrate the device, says Medtronic, but this is the first FDA approved device to automatically adjust delivery of basal insulin based on CGM sensor glucose values. How the MiniMed 670G gained FDA approval Proven failsafe mechanisms and encouraging results from a three-month, 123-person pivotal trial gave the FDA the confidence it needed approve the Medtronic MiniMed 670G. Specific findings from the trial pu Continue reading >>

How Dexcom Plans To Eliminate The Finger-stick (and Bring Cgm To The Masses), Part 2

How Dexcom Plans To Eliminate The Finger-stick (and Bring Cgm To The Masses), Part 2

In Part 2 of this Q&A, we continue our conversation with Dexcom CEO Terry Gregg, getting his insights on artificial pancreas technology, how Dexcom competes (and partners) with the major players in the diabetes device space, what startups should do to procure funding, and other topics. (Click here to read Part 1.) Med Device Online (MDO): Last month, the FDA approved new Dexcom software that incorporates the algorithm being used in international artificial pancreas research. What does this mean for CGM technology? Terry Gregg: When compared to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), or finger-stick measurement, our Dexcom Gen 4 Platinum has an accuracy of about 13 percent MARD (mean absolute relative difference). That was the best that’s ever been seen historically, even by researchers. In contrast, our predecessor product, the Seven Plus, had an MARD of 17 percent. With the new algorithm, we can achieve 9 percent MARD, so a tremendous improvement in accuracy. We believe that this improvement in accuracy will help us achieve one of our long-term goals, which is to replace finger-sticks. We want patients to have the ability to dose their insulin without having to do a confirmatory finger-stick. In our opinion, 9 percent MARD is the threshold that achieves that. Right now, we are working through the protocol with FDA right now for a clinical trial sufficient to demonstrate that level of accuracy, and we are very confident we will achieve it. We know — and again, it’s anecdotal and off-label — that many patients already dose off of their Dexcom. We don’t recommend it, but that’s the reality. We know it. FDA knows it. So we are trying to bring this technology forward in a way that makes sense, and that’s what this algorithm allows us to do. MDO: What role do Continue reading >>

Ada. Hot New Medical Devices. Medtronic's Artificial Pancreas, Cognitive Computing, Impactjan Bolinder, Wearable Insulin Patch

Ada. Hot New Medical Devices. Medtronic's Artificial Pancreas, Cognitive Computing, Impactjan Bolinder, Wearable Insulin Patch

ADA. Hot new medical devices. Medtronic's artificial pancreas, Cognitive Computing, IMPACTJan Bolinder, wearable insulin patch 1. Medtronic presents pivotal artificial pancreas data at ADA, as Insulet details its own plans Medtronicreported pivotal data for its hybrid closed-loop system at the American Diabetes Association conference in New Orleans, LA, over the weekend. The data show that the hybrid closed-loop system helped to decrease A1c levels as well as reduce variability in sensor glucose values for 124 patients with Type 1 diabetes. No major adverse eventswerereported for the study, which encompassed 12,389 patient days. The system includes a Medtronic MiniMed 670G insulin pump, fourth-generation glucose sensors and a control algorithm. In addition to the system itself, researchers monitored blood glucose levels more than four times daily via traditional finger-stick monitoring as well as via Abbott's i-STAT handheld device. Patients also calibrated the closed-loop sensors periodically. The three-month study found that the hybrid closed-loop system resulted in a mean reduction of A1c to 6.9% +/- 0.6% from 7.4% +/- 0.9%. This was the primary outcome measure of the study. The standard recommendation is to reduce HbA1c to Sensor glucose levels varied only slightly from baseline level established during a 2-week lead-in period. At the end of the study, 99 of the participants opted to enter the continued-access program for the hybrid closed-loop device. "The HCL system was safe, acceptable, and associated with improved glucose control during extended at-home use," the researchers concluded. A separate study of 12 adults and 16 adolescents found that overnight use of the closed-loop system improved time in the target glucose range for the adults and reduced nocturnal Continue reading >>

Insulet Aims For Its Artificial Pancreas To Be On The U.s. Market By Late 2019

Insulet Aims For Its Artificial Pancreas To Be On The U.s. Market By Late 2019

December 14, 2016 1:06 PM | By Omar Ford | No comments yet Insulet Corp. said Horizon, its artificial pancreas, could be on the U.S. market in late 2019. Horizon is the Billerica, Mass.-based firms first foray into continuous glucose monitoring-automated insulin delivery. If Insulets Horizon gains FDA approval, it would go up against Dublin-based, Medtronic plcs Minimed 670G artificial pancreas, which received FDA approval in September and is set to launch in April of next year. (See Medical Device Daily, Sept. 29, 2016.) Even though Horizon will be two years behind the Minimed 670Gs launch, analysts said this could be to the Insulets benefit. While Insulet is behind its competitors on CGM-automated insulin delivery, we believe the company could ultimately end up with the most compelling long term solution, said Doug Schenkel, an analyst with Cowen and Co. The Horizon platform will have some similarities to the Minimed 670G, such as continuous basal dosing. Raj Denhoy, an analyst with Jefferies said that Insulet should not take Minimed 670Gs pending arrival in the U.S. market lightly. [The] 670G marks a seminal event in the evolution of diabetes technology and the possibility that Insulet is underestimating the impact remains perhaps the biggest risk to the story over the coming months, Denhoy said. Insulet is still in the early phase of trying to get Horizon onto the market. During an earnings call last month, the company revealed that it completed its first IDE trial for the device. Insulet said it just received FDA approval for a second phase of the IDE, which will evaluate its algorithm performance in adolescents and pediatric patients. The prospect of an artificial pancreas could help remove some of the constraints diabetes patients have with monitoring and manage Continue reading >>

How Dexcom Can Fight Back Against Medtronic's Artificial Pancreas

How Dexcom Can Fight Back Against Medtronic's Artificial Pancreas

Medtronic plc (NYSE:MDT) got an FDA green-light last week to begin marketing its artificial pancreas, the MiniMed 670G, and management is planning to launch the device early next year. Will the 670G dent demand for DexCom's (NASDAQ:DXCM) continuous glucose monitors in 2017? Read on to find out how DexCom plans to keep growing. A game-changing innovation Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that is used to break down sugar into energy. However, in 1.25 million Americans who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to produce insulin, forcing patients to monitor their blood sugar levels and dose themselves insulin as necessary. The burden associated with managing type 1 diabetes is heavy, and as a result, most diabetics' blood sugar levels are out of the desired range most of the time. That's worrisome because blood sugar highs and lows can lead to life-threatening illnesses, such as heart disease. To reduce the risk of blood sugar highs and lows, Medtronic developed the 670G, a system that uses a blood glucose sensor, an insulin pump, and an infusion patch to automatically keep a type 1 diabetes patient's blood sugar levels on target. Once patients program their information into the device, the 670G manages insulin levels by automatically checking blood sugar every five minutes and dosing insulin at the appropriate levels when needed. Mealtime insulin doses are automatically calculated based on each patient's programmed insulin to carbohydrate ratio and the amount of carbohydrates that will be eaten. Upcoming threat Until now, DexCom's continuous glucose monitors (CGM) have been the biggest advance in type 1 diabetes treatment. The company's latest-generation CGM, the G5, automatically streams blood glucose levels to a patient's device or smartphon Continue reading >>

Insulet Announces Development Partner For The Omnipod Artificial Pancreas

Insulet Announces Development Partner For The Omnipod Artificial Pancreas

Insulet Announces Development Partner for the OmniPod Artificial Pancreas Company's Alliance with Algorithm Partner Marks Critical Step Forward in Advanced Diabetes Treatment Feb 25, 2016, 07:00 ET from Insulet Corporation BILLERICA, Mass., Feb. 25, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Insulet Corporation (NASDAQ: PODD ), the leader in tubeless insulin pump technology with its OmniPod Insulin Management System (OmniPod System), today announced a license agreement and partnership with Mode AGC (Automated Glucose Control LLC), to develop and incorporate the advanced artificial pancreas algorithm created by renowned researchers Francis Doyle PhD, Eyal Dassau PhD, and Howard Zisser MD. This alliance marks a significant step forward in Insulet's mission to improve the quality of life for individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes. Insulet's artificial pancreas system will use the innovative and differentiated OmniPod platform, the latest DexCom Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) technology and the algorithm licensed from Mode AGC. The algorithm was created by Drs. Doyle, Dassau and Zisser during their tenure at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and further developed by Mode AGC,a California-based early-stage medical device company founded by prominent diabetes technology specialist Thomas Peyser PhD and diabetesadvocate and entrepreneur Jennifer Schneider MD. Over the last several months, Insulet has worked with Mode AGC and the inventors to optimize the performance of the algorithm for incorporation into a commercial product. Coupled with the unique tubeless OmniPod platform, this system will be poised to deliver not only improved clinical outcomes, but the greatly desired improvement in quality of life for those living with insulin-dependent diabetes. "Insulet continues to m Continue reading >>

The Future For Insulin Pumps

The Future For Insulin Pumps

Guest Post by David Kliff, Diabetic Investor Newsletter. This morning I learned of yet another closed-loop insulin delivery system, i.e. artificial pancreas, under development. Per a post on the Drug Delivery web site: Cellnovo and Diabeloop said this week they are launching a CE Mark cross-over registration study for an artificial pancreas device Diabeloop is developing which uses Cellnovo’s insulin pump. Now keep in mind that Medtronic is currently launching the 670G, the artificial pancreas that really isn’t an artificial pancreas. Animas, Insulet, and Tandem all have closed-loop projects under way and the premise behind Bigfoot is a closed-loop system. Is it possible that this way-cool whiz-bang device could end up like every other whiz-bang way-cool diabetes device and become a commodity? Yep! Is it possible that when it becomes a commodity there will be a price war? Yep! Do we really need 5 or 6 of these suckers? Nope. Will that stop anyone from trying? Nope. The reality is we are still trying to figure out how anyone is going to make money in this market. Just looking at the 670G from Medtronic and all the additional expense this system demands, it does make one wonder. So far patient reaction to the 670G has been what I have anticipated, a love-hate affair. When it works, patients love it; when it doesn’t, it’s just another pump. Also, as I anticipated, the pump itself is nothing special and the love-hate scenario rests solely on sensor performance. Based on everything I have seen and read so far, the new Enlite sensor is better than the old one. That was a low bar to jump over. Is it as accurate and reliable as the Dexcom G5? That’s debatable. Yet, let’s look beyond which sensor is “better” or which pump has a more patient-friendly user interfac Continue reading >>

(c) 2015-2017 Dana Lewis & The #openaps Community. Openaps™, #openaps™, Openaps™, And All Derivatives Of The Name Are Trademarks Of Dana Lewis & The #openaps Community And Are Not Authorized For Use By Any Commercial Entity. Contact: Dana@openaps.org

(c) 2015-2017 Dana Lewis & The #openaps Community. Openaps™, #openaps™, Openaps™, And All Derivatives Of The Name Are Trademarks Of Dana Lewis & The #openaps Community And Are Not Authorized For Use By Any Commercial Entity. Contact: [email protected]

The Open Artificial Pancreas System project (#OpenAPS) is an open and transparent effort to make safe and effective basic Artificial Pancreas System (APS) technology widely available to more quickly improve and save as many lives as possible and reduce the burden of Type 1 diabetes. OpenAPS means basic overnight closed loop APS technology is more widely available to anyone with compatible medical devices who is willing to build their own system. We believe that we can make safe and effective APS technology available more quickly, to more people, rather than just waiting for current APS efforts to complete clinical trials and be FDA-approved and commercialized through traditional processes. And in the process, we believe we can engage the untapped potential of dozens or possibly hundreds of patient innovators and independent researchers and also make APS technology available to hundreds or thousands of people willing to participate as subjects in clinical trials. The body of work by the OpenAPS community includes a safety-focused reference design, a toolset, and an open source reference implementation that can be used by any individual – or any medical device manufacturer. We believe this will in turn allow manufacturers (and the academic research teams they work with) to turn more of their attention to designing and testing more advanced APS systems, and thereby accelerate the pace of innovation toward new and improved Type 1 diabetes treatments, and eventually a cure. Please note that OpenAPS community efforts will be open source and free for use for other people, open source projects, researchers, and non-profits to use, and available on an open and non-discriminatory basis for all commercial manufacturers to use in proprietary products if desired. Continue reading >>

Insulet Announces Development Partner For The Omnipod Artificial Pancreas

Insulet Announces Development Partner For The Omnipod Artificial Pancreas

Insulet Announces Development Partner for the OmniPod Artificial Pancreas Insulet Announces Development Partner for the OmniPod Artificial Pancreas : PODD), the leader in tubeless insulin pump technology with its OmniPod Insulin Management System (OmniPod System), today announced a license agreement and partnership with Mode AGC ( ), to develop and incorporate the advanced artificial pancreas algorithm created by renowned researchers MD. This alliance marks a significant step forward in mission to improve the quality of life for individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes. artificial pancreas system will use the innovative and differentiated OmniPod platform, the latest DexCom Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) technology and the algorithm licensed from Mode AGC. The algorithm was created by Drs. Doyle, Dassau and Zisser during their tenure at the -based early-stage medical device company founded by prominent diabetes technology specialist PhD and diabetesadvocate and entrepreneur has worked with Mode AGC and the inventors to optimize the performance of the algorithm for incorporation into a commercial product. Coupled with the unique tubeless OmniPod platform, this system will be poised to deliver not only improved clinical outcomes, but the greatly desired improvement in quality of life for those living with insulin-dependent diabetes. continues to make substantial progress toward incorporating advanced artificial pancreas functionality into the future-generation of OmniPod," said Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Artificial Pancreas Project "I have had the privilege of working closely with is unquestionably one of the leading Artificial Pancreas algorithm groups in the world. I look forward to continued collaboration with Frank and Mode AGC on developing Continue reading >>

The First ‘artificial Pancreas’ Systems Are Coming To Market

The First ‘artificial Pancreas’ Systems Are Coming To Market

The first so-called artificial pancreas systems – wearable devices that take charge of the crucial process of measuring glucose levels and delivering precise doses of insulin – are now beginning to come to market. That’s welcome news for the nation’s 30 million diabetics, who stand not only to get some relief from the seemingly incessant stream of lancets, test strips and syringes, but also to stay healthier. That’s because an artificial pancreas can keep the disease on a tighter leash than they can, by testing more frequently and delivering more precise insulin doses. That’s not only important for patients, but could ease strains on the nation's healthcare system. This spring, Medtronic became the first supplier out of the gate when it began outfitting a pre-selected pool of type 1 diabetes patients with its new MiniMed 670G. Once that group is trained and equipped – probably by midyear – Medtronic expects to make the device more widely available. Several efforts – including startup Bigfoot Biomedical, Insulet and a partnership between Dexcom, Tandem and TypeZero – are hot on Medtronic’s heels, with active studies now underway and plans to go to market late this year or in 2018. Though the term artificial pancreas is widely used, medical professionals tend to steer clear because some patients hear it and think they’re in for an organ transplant. They’re not. An artificial pancreas doesn’t replace the actual organ. Devices aren’t implanted or surgically attached. Moreover, they only take over one of the organ’s digestive responsibilities: that is, regulating glucose levels. Those in healthcare prefer the term “closed-loop systems,” so called because they monitor glucose levels, employ artificial intelligence to make dosing decisions a Continue reading >>

Global External Insulin Pumps Strategic Business Report 2015-2022: Key Players Are Debiotech, F. Hoffmann-la Roche, , Insulet, Medtronic, Sooil Development & Tandem Diabetes Care

Global External Insulin Pumps Strategic Business Report 2015-2022: Key Players Are Debiotech, F. Hoffmann-la Roche, , Insulet, Medtronic, Sooil Development & Tandem Diabetes Care

Global External Insulin Pumps Strategic Business Report 2015-2022: Key Players are Debiotech, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, , Insulet, Medtronic, Sooil Development & Tandem Diabetes Care Dublin, Feb. 16, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "Insulin Pumps (External) - Global Strategic Business Report" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Canada, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Rest of World. Annual estimates and forecasts are provided for the period 2015 through 2022. Also, a six-year historic analysis is provided for these markets. Market data and analytics are derived from primary and secondary research. This report analyzes the worldwide markets for Insulin Pumps (External) in US$ Thousand. The report profiles 15 companies including many key and niche players such as: Key Benefits Offered Infuse Sustained Growth Opportunities Lower Current Penetration Leaves Significant Room for Growth Comparison of Select Durable Insulin Pumps by Manufacturer Medtronic Banks on New Solutions and Distribution Expansion to Retain Dominance Ypsomed Eyes Brighter Prospects with YpsoPump Competitive Landscape in the Insulin Patch Pump Market Insulet's OmniPod Benefits from Lack of Close Competition in its League Insulet Focuses on Advances in Technology and Services to Gain Market Share Cellnovo's Patch Pump Combines Functionality and Cost- Effectiveness An Affordable Patch Pump for Type II Diabetics Valeritas Struggles to Push Sales of V-Go Prefilled Insulin Cartridges Gain Popularity over Manual Filling Innovative Features Spruce Up the Market for Insulin Pumps The Risk of Diabetes in Aging Populace Presents Opportunities for Insulin Pumps Diabetes in Developing Countries to Expand Opportunities Customer Continue reading >>

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