diabetestalk.net

Ingrown Fingernail Diabetes

How To Get Rid Of An Ingrown Toenail

How To Get Rid Of An Ingrown Toenail

Current: How to Get Rid of an Ingrown Toenail Dr. Axe on Facebook401 Dr. Axe on Twitter13 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest549 Share on Email Print Article If youve ever had an ingrown toenail, you know the pain that it can cause. Not only that, but its annoying we use our toes in some way or another as part of our usual daily movement, and this use and constant knocking seems to aggravate the nail even more. It makes the pain more noticeable and seems to last forever! An ingrown toenail, or onychocryptosis, may occur at any age and is one of the mostly common toenail problems. Itcan be a painful condition that can easily become infected without proper care.While more studies need to be conducted, there are a few that suggest a slightly higher male-to-female ratio, particularly in the 1425 age group; however, it can affect patients of any age. There are multiple reasons why an ingrown toenail develops, including:( 1 ) anatomical factors likethickening of the nail plate pressure from abutting digits caused by hallux valgus or lesser toe deformities occasionally, the use of isotretinoin in the treatment of severe acne Something thats often forgotten is that toenail fungus can become part of the problem too. Usually, nail fungus occurs when fungus enters the nail through a small trauma, such as a cut or break in the nail. Though often a misconception, nail fungus is not caused by poor hygiene. However, if you have an ingrown toenail, you need to be conscious of keeping the area clean. ( 2 ) Luckily, there are many natural ways to get rid of an ingrown toenail on your own without needing a trip to the doctor. Lets take a look at some more details on ingrown toenails and how to get rid of them. What is an ingrown toenail, and Continue reading >>

Ingrowing Toenails

Ingrowing Toenails

An ingrown toenail is a common condition which may cause discomfort or become infected. You might see the condition described as 'ingrowing' but both terms mean the same thing. Various treatments can be given by a doctor or a person qualified to diagnose and treat foot disorders (a podiatrist). See a doctor if you have symptoms of infection around the nail, particularly if you have diabetes, a poor immune system or other foot problems. What is an ingrown toenail? The nail becomes ingrown when the side of the nail cuts into the skin next to the nail. This can become painful. The skin next to the nail may also become infected or inflamed. Any toe can be affected but it is usually the big toe. It is a common problem, especially in teenagers and young adults. However, ingrown toenails can also occur in babies or toddlers. Ingrown toenail causes An ingrown toenail is usually caused by a sharp spike of nail growing into the skin beside it. This can happen as a result of various factors. Not trimming your nails correctly, wearing poorly-fitting shoes or tight socks, and sweating a lot (during exercise, for example) can all contribute. Shoes which force the toes towards each other encourage the nail to grow into the skin. For example, tight shoes, high heels and pointed-toe shoes. Active, sporty people may be more prone to ingrown toenails as they sweat more. Ingrown toenails may occur more often in people who have nails which are deformed in some way. Often there is no apparent reason why it occurs. It is also more common in people who cut their toenails very short and round. The correct way of cutting nails is straight across (see below). This helps the nail to grow normally and may prevent ingrown toenails from developing. Other possible causes are injury to the nail, a fung Continue reading >>

How To Treat An Ingrown Fingernail

How To Treat An Ingrown Fingernail

Medically reviewed by William Morrison, MD on August 11, 2017 Written by Susan York Morris Ingrown nails dont just happen to your toes . Your fingernails can also become ingrown. This occurs less frequently in fingers because youre not squeezing your fingers into shoes that dont fit well. Also, the shape of your fingernails makes it less likely that they will become ingrown. However, ingrown fingernails do happen and they can become infected. This makes everyday tasks such as typing on a keyboard or doing the dishes painful. Your nails and skin are made of a protein called keratin . Nails are formed when dense layers of keratinized cells push to the surface of your finger. Ridges on your nails correspond to skin ridges underneath your nails. These help hold your nails in place. When the shape of your nail changes, the ridges that hold your nail in place can lose their connection. This can cause the nail to grow into the sides or corners of your skin. This is known as an ingrown nail. A number of things can cause this, including: When an ingrown fingernail causes a severe infection, particularly if an abscess forms, your doctor may recommend one of several medical procedures. You or your doctor may gently lift up the nail and insert a small wedge of medicated cotton between your nail and the inflamed skin next to the nail. This can relieve pain and enable the nail to grow properly. If your ingrown fingernail has developed into an abscess, a doctor should drain it. Your finger will be numbed with local anesthesia in the doctors office before an incision is made to drain the pus. If there is significant drainage, the doctor may place a gauze piece, or wick, in the incision so it may continue to drain for a day or two. Ingrown fingernails rarely require surgical treatment. Continue reading >>

 Home Remedies For Ingrown Fingernails

Home Remedies For Ingrown Fingernails

Apple cider vinegar is on a large list of natural remedies, and thats because its a powerhouse for health and wellness. Like Epsom salt, apple cider vinegar acts as an agent to reduce inflammation, and it also works as a way to reduce getting a bacterial infection. To use this, youll want to mix several tablespoons of apple cider vinegar in some warm water to soak your finger. Let it soak in this solution for about 10 minutes three times a day until this condition starts to improve. Hydrogen peroxide is a great choice for a soak in case youre worried about the potential for infection. Youll add some hydrogen peroxide to warm water to soak your fingernails. If you dont have time for soaking, you can just put some hydrogen peroxide on a cotton square and apply it directly to your affected finger. Lemons are a very beneficial fruit that often gets overlooked when it comes to the health benefits. This isnt just for a tasty drink, but can also be useful in helping your ingrown nail problem. Youll want to rub a lemon on your problem finger, and itll help bring the nail up. Some people take a slice of lemon, and wrap it around the finger to sit overnight. If applying the lemon directly is painful due to a cut on the finger, you can also make a warm water soak with lemon juice. Tea tree oil is a wonderful essential oil that has many healing properties, in addition, to be antibacterial, antifungal, and antivira (buy it here) l. This also will help with inflammation. You can apply this directly to a cotton ball to apply to your affected fingernail or create a warm water soak for it. Some people have sensitive skin that does better with diluted tea tree oil as it can be rather strong like most essential oils. Thrive Leads Shortcode could not be rendered, please check it in Thrive Continue reading >>

Treating Infected Ingrown Nails | Howstuffworks

Treating Infected Ingrown Nails | Howstuffworks

It seems unlikely that you wouldn't notice an ingrown toenail, but it can happen. People with diabetes or circulation problems are especially likely to overlook an ingrown nail, while others may wait too long to begin treatment. If this happens, the nail can become infected. An ingrown nail can become infected in a few different ways. First, the overgrowth of the tissue onto the nail can permanently damage the tissue and cause infection. Second, an untreated ingrown toenail may begin to infect the bone that lies beneath it, which can lead to a serious bone infection. An infected ingrown nail is warm, red and swollen, and it may drain pus [sources: Mayo Clinic , WebMD ]. If you're worried that your ingrown nail is infected, talk to your doctor. A physician can prescribe topical or oral antibiotics to fight the infection. At home, you can soak your toes in soapy water or salt water and then apply an antiseptic and a sterile bandage. If you have recurrent ingrown nails and infections, you may want to consider having the nail or part of the nail surgically removed [source: American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons ]. The most important thing to know about ingrown nails is that they're avoidable. If you wear comfortable shoes and keep your nails -- on both your fingers and toes -- trimmed properly, then you're less likely to develop ingrown nails. If you still develop ingrown nails, treat them immediately and consult a physician if they become infected. For more information on ingrown nails, see the links on the following page. People with diabetes are more prone to complications with ingrown nails. Diabetes can damage your nerves, making it more difficult to recognize a foot injury, and if an injury is left untreated, it can become infected. An infection is more problematic Continue reading >>

Paronychia

Paronychia

Paronychia (pronounced: pair-uh-NIK-ee-uh) is an infection of the skin around a fingernail or toenail. The infected area can get swollen, red, and painful. Sometimes a pus-filled blister may form. Most of the time, paronychia is no big deal and can be treated at home. In rare cases, the infection can spread to the rest of the finger or toe. When that happens, it can lead to bigger problems that may need a doctor's help. You're not likely to get paronychia in a toe (unless you have an ingrown toenail ). But fingernail paronychia is one of the most common hand infections there is Paronychia usually happens when the skin around a person's nail is irritated or injured. When the skin around the nail is damaged, germs can get in and cause an infection. These germs can be bacteria (causing bacterial paronychia) or fungi (causing fungal paronychia). clipping a nail too short or trimming the cuticle (the skin around the sides and bottom of the nail) having hands in water a lot (as from a job washing dishes in a restaurant) Some people get paronychia infections after a manicure or using from chemicals in the glue used with artificial nails. Certain health conditions (like diabetes) also can make paronychia more likely. And if your hands are in water a lot (if you wash dishes at a restaurant, for example), that ups the chances of getting paronychia. Chances are, if you have paronychia, it will be easy to recognize. There will be an area of skin around a nail that is painful and tender when you touch it. The area probably will be red and swollen and feel warm. You may see a pus-filled blister. If the paronychia has been there a long time, the nail may turn a different color. It might not be its usual shape or might look as if it's coming away from the nail bed. If paronychia is mi Continue reading >>

Ingrown Toenail

Ingrown Toenail

An ingrown toenail develops when the sides of the toenail grow into the surrounding skin. The nail curls and pierces the skin, which becomes red, swollen and tender. The big toe is often affected, either on one or both sides. Other possible symptoms include: pain if pressure is placed on the toe inflammation of the skin at the end of the toe a build-up of fluid in the area surrounding the toe an overgrowth of skin around the affected toe bleeding white or yellow pus coming from the affected area When to see your GP See your GP or podiatrist (foot care specialist) if your ingrown toenail is badly inflamed, bleeding or has pus coming from it, because it may be infected. It's also important to seek medical advice if you have diabetes and an ingrown toenail. Having diabetes could affect how your toenail heals. Read more about foot care and diabetes. Causes of ingrown toenails A number of things can cause an ingrown toenail to develop, including: badly cut toenails – cutting your toenails too short, or cutting the edges, will encourage the skin to fold over your nail and the nail to grow into the skin wearing tight-fitting shoes, socks or tights – this places pressure on the skin around your toenail; the skin may be pierced if it's pressed on to your toenail sweaty feet – if the skin around your toenails is soft, it's easier for your nail to pierce it and embed itself within it injury – for example, stubbing your toe can sometimes cause an ingrown toenail to develop natural shape of the nail – the sides of curved or fan-shaped toenails are more likely to press into the skin surrounding the nail A fungal nail infection can cause your toenail to thicken or widen. Treating ingrown toenails Without treatment, an ingrown toenail can become infected, so it’s important Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Ingrown Toenails

Dangers Of Ingrown Toenails

Find out why an ingrown toenail should be treated right away in those with diabetes. If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes then chances are good that you were told to look for specific warning signs that mean it’s time to see your doctor. Unfortunately, foot complications are fairly common in those with diabetes. It’s important to find out when you have an ingrown toenail and when to turn to your Denver podiatrists Dr. Eric Jaakola and Dr. Anna Weber for ingrown toenail treatment in Denver. What causes an ingrown toenail? While an ingrown toenail can happen for many reasons it is often the result of either wearing shoes that are too tight or loose or not trimming the nail properly. Any pressure placed on the toe can cause an ingrown toenail to form. If you trim your toenails make sure that you never trim them too short and that you always cut the nail straight across rather than at a curve. If you are having trouble trimming your toenails due to poor mobility or other issues don’t hesitate to see your Denver, CO foot doctors for proper toenail care. What are the symptoms of an ingrown toenail? You will most likely notice redness, swelling or pain around the infected nail if you are dealing with an ingrown toenail. Why should I see my doctor if I have an ingrown toenail? It might be tempting to try and treat the ingrown toenail on your own, but if you have been diagnosed with diabetes, poor circulation, or nerve damage in your foot or leg then you need to see us right away. We have the proper tools to treat this problem before complications arise. Those with diabetes are more at risk for developing a serious infection that can spread to the toes and even the bone. At the first signs of an ingrown toenail please give us a call right away. Don’t let foot problem Continue reading >>

Paronychia

Paronychia

Overview What is paronychia? Paronychia (say: “pare-oh-nick-ee-uh”) is an infection in the skin around the fingernails or toenails. It usually affects the skin at the base (cuticle) or up the sides of the nail. There are two types of paronychia: acute paronychia and chronic paronychia. Acute paronychia often occurs in only one nail. Chronic paronychia may occur in one nail or several at once. Chronic paronychia either doesn’t get better or keeps coming back. Symptoms What are the symptoms of paronychia? Typically, paronychia begins with pain, swelling and redness around the base or the sides of the nail. Acute paronychia can cause pus-filled pockets (abscesses) to form at the side or base of the fingernail or toenail. Chronic paronychia may cause the cuticle to break down. This type of paronychia may eventually cause the nail to separate from the skin. The nail may become thick, hard and deformed. Paronychia caused by bacteria can get worse quickly. Fungus-caused paronychia typically gets worse much more gradually. Causes & Risk Factors What causes paronychia? Biting, chewing or picking at nails, pulling hangnails or sucking on fingers can increase the risk of getting an infection. An ingrown toenail can also cause paronychia. Chronic paronychia can occur when nails are exposed to water or harsh chemicals for long periods of time. Moisture allows certain germs, such as candida (a type of fungus), and bacteria to grow. People whose hands may be wet for long periods of time are at higher risk for chronic paronychia. These may include bartenders, dishwashers, food handlers or housecleaners. Chronic paronychia may be caused by irritant dermatitis, a condition that makes skin red and itchy. Once the skin is irritated, germs can take hold and cause an infection. Paronyc Continue reading >>

Fingernails How To Recognize Diabetes In Nails | Diabetic Connect

Fingernails How To Recognize Diabetes In Nails | Diabetic Connect

Fingernails: How To Recognize Diabetes In Nails? Fingernails: how to recognize diabetes in nails? By BreC Latest Reply2015-02-01 06:33:29 -0600 For many years my fingernails grow slightly curled downward. I have read that it is a sign of different medical issues. I googled the term diabetes and fingernail problems and found this article. I don't believe everything I see on the internet so it's a maybe/maybe not for me. Fingernails: how to recognize diabetes in nails? Typical diabetes nail features are: (1) Opaque white nails with a dark band at the fingertip, (2) Yellowing of the nail bed, (3) Terry's nail, (4) onychomoycosis, (5) blue lunula, (6) redness in the proximal nail fold (paronychia), and a (7) flat- or spoon nails. Nail diseases are in a separate category from diseases of the skin. Although nails are a skin appendage, they have their own signs and symptoms which may relate to other medical conditions. Nail conditions that show signs of infection or inflammation require medical assistance and cannot be treated at a beauty parlor. Deformity or disease of the nails (diabetes nails) may be referred to as onychosis. The most common nail disease are: Onychocryptosis (= ingrown fingernails), Onychodystrophy (nail deformation), Onychogryposis (ram's-horn nail), Onycholysis (loosening of the nail bed), Onychomadesis (falling off), Onychomycosis (contagious infection), and Koilonychia (nail curves upwards) - source: Wikipedia. Continue reading >>

Ingrown Toenail

Ingrown Toenail

An ingrown toenail can result from a number of things. Poorly fitting shoes and toenails that are not properly trimmed are the most common causes. The skin along the edge of a toenail may become red and infected. The great toe is affected most often, but any toenail can become ingrown. An ingrown toenail may occur when extra pressure is placed on your toe. This pressure is caused by shoes that are too tight or fit poorly. If you walk often or play sports, a shoe that is even a little tight can cause this problem. Deformities of the foot or toes can also place extra pressure on the toe. Nails that are not trimmed properly can also cause ingrown toenails: Toenails that are trimmed too short, or if the edges are rounded rather than cut straight across may cause the nail to curl and grow into the skin. Poor eyesight, inability to reach the toes easily, or having thick nails can make it hard to properly trim nails. Picking or tearing at the corners of the nails can also cause an ingrown toenail. Some people are born with nails that are curved and grow into the skin. Others have toenails that are too large for their toes. Stubbing your toe or other injuries can also lead to an ingrown toenail. Continue reading >>

Ingrown Nail

Ingrown Nail

An ingrown nail (also known as onychocryptosis from [undefined] error: {{lang-xx}}: no text (help) ὄνυξ (onyx, "nail") + κρυπτός (kryptos, "hidden") or unguis incarnates)[1] is a common form of nail disease. It is an often painful condition in which the nail grows so that it cuts into one or both sides of the paronychium or nail bed. The common opinion is that the nail enters inside the paronychium, but an ingrown toenail can simply be overgrown toe skin.[2] The condition starts from a microbial inflammation of the paronychium, then a granuloma, which results in a nail buried inside of the granuloma.[citation needed] While ingrown nails can occur in the nails of both the hands and the feet [1][citation needed], they occur most commonly with the toenails. A true ingrown toenail is caused by the actual penetration of flesh by a sliver of nail.[3] Signs and symptoms[edit] Symptoms of an ingrown nail include pain along the margins of the nail (caused by hypergranulation that occurs around the aforementioned margins), worsening of pain when wearing tight footwear, and sensitivity to pressure of any kind, even the weight of bedsheets. Bumping of an affected toe can produce sharp and even excruciating pain as the tissue is punctured further by the nail. By the very nature of the condition, ingrown nails become easily infected unless special care is taken early to treat the condition by keeping the area clean. Signs of infection include redness and swelling of the area around the nail, drainage of pus and watery discharge tinged with blood. The main symptom is swelling at the base of the nail on the ingrowing side (though it may be both sides). Onychocryptosis should not be confused with a similar nail disorder, convex nail, nor with other painful conditions such as Continue reading >>

How To Treat An Ingrown Fingernail

How To Treat An Ingrown Fingernail

Too-short, curved and dirty fingernails can lead to ingrown nails. Liz Turner has been writing since 1994. Her work has been published in several technology publications and local newspapers, as well as on eHow and LIVESTRONG.COM. She has writing and editing experience in technology, business, children's issues, travel, animal care, beauty, health and fitness topics. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Central Florida. Ingrown fingernails occur when the edge of a fingernail grows into the skin surrounding it. The usual cause of ingrown fingernails is improper trimming of the nail, although nail biting or an injury to the hand that tears the nail can be the culprit too. And sometimes the natural shape or thickness of the nail can make you more susceptible to ingrown nails. Whatever the cause, they range from annoying to excruciatingly painful, and the American Academy of Dermatology warns an ingrown nail can become infected if left untreated. Soak the finger in warm water two or three times a day for 15 to 20 minutes each day to reduce swelling. Be sure to dry the area thoroughly after soaking, since leaving the area wet could allow the nail to dig in more deeply. Wedge a small piece of cotton under the edge of the nail immediately after soaking to lift it away from the skin. Continue this for a few days to see if it helps. Fingernails grow an average of 2 to 3 mm each month, according to the American Academy of Dermatology, so keeping the nail lifted away should allow it to grow past the skin fairly quickly. Take over-the-counter pain medication such as ibuprofen for the pain if necessary, and apply antibiotic cream to help fight infection. However, the Mayo Clinic warns that pus or redness may mean an infection has already taken hold; if this Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Treat Ingrown Toenails

10 Ways To Treat Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails can be very painful and at times need the attention of a professional, but there are some things you can do on your own. Sign Up for Our Healthy Living Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Ingrown toenails are painful, and they can be tricky to treat because they can easily become infected and are often a recurring problem. If your ingrown toenail has become infected, you shouldn't attempt to treat it yourself. "The first thing is, if they're infected, they need to be seen by a podiatrist ," says Alan K. Mauser, DPM, a podiatrist in Louisville, Ky. If the ingrown toenail is not infected, you can try some at-home remedies to keep the pain at bay and prevent the ingrown toenail from coming back. Here are some ideas: Try a foot soak. Allow your sore toe to soak in a warm salt water bath for 15 minutes a couple of times every day. This soak can help relieve pain and swelling in an ingrown toenail. Dry your foot completely after each soak. Take an over-the-counter pain-relieving medication, like acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Gently pull the skin away from the nail using a small nail file or other blunt device that won't cut or hurt the toe. Stuff tiny pieces of clean, moist cotton between the ingrown toenail and the skin to help separate them and provide a little cushioning to the skin. You can soak the cotton in a bit of water or an antiseptic cleanser first. Rub your toe with antibiotic ointment to help reduce your chance of developing an infection. Cover the sore toe with a Band-Aid or other bandage to offer a little extra padding and protection. Choose shoes that are easy on your toes. Shoes made of soft fabrics with a wide toe are a good choice try wearing sanda Continue reading >>

Ingrown Fingernail Infection, Causes, Treatment And Home Remedies

Ingrown Fingernail Infection, Causes, Treatment And Home Remedies

Ingrown Fingernail Infection, Causes, Treatment and Home Remedies Ingrown Fingernail Infection, Causes, Treatment and Home Remedies Ingrown nail is a condition where a fingernail grows into the skin that surrounds it. It is a common condition that occurs especially on the big toe. What are the causes of an Ingrown fingernail? Use of tight fitting shoes If you wear shoes that strain the toes because they are tight, you are likely to experience this problem. These shoes are normally the pointed, high-heeled shoes of those that put a lot of pressure on the toes. The use of tight socks can also lead to this problem. When you use these tight shoes and socks, this problem is likely to give you some paining experience. Wrong trimming of the nail is another thing that may lead to ingrown fingernails. If you trim the nails too short or around the ages, you are likely to experience ingrown fingernails. To avoid occurrence of this problem, it will be good for you to trim your nails to the required size. Another major cause of ingrown fingernail is injuries. When you are involved in exercises or sports activities, you are likely to injure your nails depending on the condition of the ground you are playing in. during sports, the kind of shoes you use can also lead to this problem. If your shoes are tight, they are likely to strain your toes. This condition may also result from tear and wear of the toes depending on the kind of activity you are engaged in. Other people may find themselves in this condition due to the way their nails have grown. Thick or curved nails are at a high chance of getting affected by this condition. If you are one of such a people with this kind of nails, you should be careful or else you will be in this problem. It is good to file your nails so that they a Continue reading >>

More in diabetes