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Indian Sweets For Diabetics

Indian Sweet Recipe: Sugar Free, Low Fat, High Protein Doodh Peda

Indian Sweet Recipe: Sugar Free, Low Fat, High Protein Doodh Peda

Indian Sweet Recipe: Sugar FREE, LOW Fat, HIGH Protein Doodh Peda Growing up in North Delta, next to Surrey BC, a lot of my closest friends were and are east indian so I got to experience a lot of different ethnic foods. One great thing about coming over to my friends houses as the white kid is all the food their parents would feed me and offer to me to try. This of course did NOT help me in my childhood obesity days but it was very enjoyable and gave me some major perspective on world cuisine. One of the most interesting and tasty foods I ever tried were the indian sweets I would get around the holiday Diwali. I have a VERY strong sweet tooth so the syrupy and sugary indian sweets like Gulab Jamun, barfi, peda, and jalebi were some of my favourite addictions. Unfortunately traditional indian sweet recipes are extremely HIGH in calories because of the deep frying and the amount of ghee (clarified butter) and sugar they use to make them. Being in the fitness and nutrition industry has gotten me more and more intrigued about creating LOWER calorie versions of these sweets. Thus started my mini obsession. Doodh Peda Out of all the Indian sweets I’ve tried, one of my all time favourites (aside from Gulab Jamuns) is Doodh Peda. It is a doughy like sweet that can be nice and chewy with a hint of Cardamom and sometimes saffron. After attempting many different recipes using condensed milk and the microwave I’ve found the LOWEST CALORIE and LOWEST FAT version I could come up with. How? How I was able to achieve such a LOW CALORIE version was using 0 calorie sweeteners like stevia or pure sucralose, STICK FREE Pan, SKIM Milk, and olive oil SPRAY. The Recipe: Ingredients: 976g (4 cups) Skim Milk 1g Stevia 0.5g (1/4 Tsp) Cardamom 1/4 Tsp Citric Acid 6g (2 Tsp) Corn flour (disso Continue reading >>

Bitter Reality Of Sugar-free Sweets

Bitter Reality Of Sugar-free Sweets

Sugar-free sweets has been the mantra for Deepavali over past few years, with a lot more sweet shops in the city adding a counter for these special sweets made with artificial sweeteners for the diabetic and diet conscious clientele. But, before you buy the exorbitantly priced ‘zero calorie mithai’, make sure you read the fine print on the cover. “Artificial sweeteners such as Aspartame are a no-no for people with genetic disorders like PKU (Phenylketonuria). The declaration on the sweet package should indicate the name of the sweetener used in the preparation. Also, there is a cap on the permissible amount of artificial sweetener that can be used to prepare sweets,” says Sudarshan Rao, scientist, Food and Drug Toxicology Research Centre, National Institute of Nutrition, Tarnaka. “The permissible limit of taking artificial sweeteners is 40 mg per kilo body weight. Plus, artificial sweeteners such as Aspartame are heat sensitive and cannot be used in making sweets,” says Rajiv Medanki, physician at a corporate hospital. Aspartame, Saccharin, Acesulfame potassium or Acesulfame K and Sucralose are a few common artificial sweeteners available in the market under various trade names. “A combination of sweeteners such as Saccharin and Cyclamate are used to reduce the bitter and metallic taste. Cyclamate, a first generation artificial sweetener, is known to cause cancer of the brain and bladder. It has been banned by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). There has been a lot of controversy around the sweeteners, as to whether they are healthy or lead to mutations that result in cancer,” says Suneetha Sapur, clinical nutritionist and director of city-based Akshaya Foundation. Experts say that while there is no supportive evidence to prove the toxicity for most Continue reading >>

Easy No-bake Diabetic Dessert Recipes

Easy No-bake Diabetic Dessert Recipes

No need to preheat! Whether it’s hot outside or you just need a quick sweet treat, whip up one of these diabetes-friendly desserts without ever turning on the oven. Find recipes for no-bake cheesecakes, simple cereal cookies, and refreshing fruit desserts that are delicious, healthy, and easy-to-make! No need to preheat! Whether it’s hot outside or you just need a quick sweet treat, whip up one of these diabetes-friendly desserts without ever turning on the oven. Find recipes for no-bake cheesecakes, simple cereal cookies, and refreshing fruit desserts that are delicious, healthy, and easy-to-make! No need to preheat! Whether it’s hot outside or you just need a quick sweet treat, whip up one of these diabetes-friendly desserts without ever turning on the oven. Find recipes for no-bake cheesecakes, simple cereal cookies, and refreshing fruit desserts that are delicious, healthy, and easy-to-make! No need to preheat! Whether it’s hot outside or you just need a quick sweet treat, whip up one of these diabetes-friendly desserts without ever turning on the oven. Find recipes for no-bake cheesecakes, simple cereal cookies, and refreshing fruit desserts that are delicious, healthy, and easy-to-make! Continue reading >>

7 Diabetic Friendly Indian Sweets

7 Diabetic Friendly Indian Sweets

This page been viewed 9735 times Diabetics can also enjoy limited amounts of sweetmeats as long as they are prepared correctly, with the right mix of ingredients. We have taken care to see that these sweets will not create a surge or sugar rush when eaten. We have removed or reduced full fat milk from the Desserts and replaced it with low fat milk and low fat paneer which form the base of Indian Desserts. For sweetening, sugar substitutes have been used and apples at times. So hope you enjoy these recipes. Our team of nutritionists have adapted special sweets like Oats Apple Phirni , Stuffed Lychees and many more to suit diabetics by replacing sugar and fat-laden ingredients with healthier counterparts. Below is the list of diabetic-friendly recipes: 7 Diabetic Friendly Indian Sweets Satisfy your sweet tooth with this cardamom-flavoured low-fat Paneer Kheer. By replacing traditional sweeteners with sugar substitute, and by doing away with unhealthy thickeners, we ward off those unnecessary carbohydrates and calories too. So, you can enjoy the rich texture and wonderful flavour o .... Continue reading >>

Diwali 2017: Make This Diwali Diabetic-friendly With These Sugar Free Sweets

Diwali 2017: Make This Diwali Diabetic-friendly With These Sugar Free Sweets

One of the most widely celebrated Indian festivals, Diwali falls on 19th October 2017. Diwali is commemorated to celebrate the homecoming of Lord Rama with his wife Sita and brother Laxmana, after 14 years of exile. The preparations for one of the most significant festivals in the Hindu calender are on in full swing, from buying new clothes to purchasing interesting Diwali gifts for friends and family- one can't help but notice the festive spirit. Sweets play a significant role in almost every festival in India. During Diwali, people indulge in and distribute delicious sweets like kaju katli, besan laddoo, coconut laddoo or dry fruits based mithai. While everyone's merry making and pleasing their sweet tooth, people suffering from diabetes have to be extra cautious when it comes to their sweet intake. What if we were to tell you that you can enjoy Diwali celebrations along with you share of sweet treats? Being diabetic does not mean that you have to give up on sweets entirely. Choose carefully and limit your portions. Desserts made at the best. Don't use full-fat milk if you're preparing sweets at home. Also, replace sugar with natural sweeteners such as jaggery and dates. Here are some sugar-free dessert options you can try at home for your Diwali celebrations. 1.Ragi Coconut Ladoo (Laddu) Recipe Recipe by A Shanthi Made with millet or Ragi flour, Ragi Coconut Laddu is an immensely popular dish. This delicious laddoo is loaded with fibre, minerals and protein which makes it a great treat for diabetics. The wholesome delight is packed with the goodness of coconut, jaggery and crunchy peanuts. (Also Read: Diwali 2017: When Is Diwali? The Significance of the Diwali, Date, Puja and Prasad) 2.Ragi Malpua Recipe by Chef Seema Chandra Here's the Indian pancake dessert with a Continue reading >>

Restaurants Sugar Up Diabetics’ Sweet Options

Restaurants Sugar Up Diabetics’ Sweet Options

Two years ago Ashok G, a diabetic, had no choice but to skip desserts even at five-star hotels, while his family gorged on sweets. But now, not only does he join the party, but he's actually spoilt for choice as many restaurants and home bakers now do a regal spread for diabetics. "I am glad that restaurants have options for diabetics now. From desserts to offering healthy meals, Chennai's food scene has changed in the last couple of years," he says. On World Diabetes Day, today, Chennai Times speaks to chefs and home bakers about how they are catering to the palates of diabetics in the city. While the city's five-star hotels are cooking up a special course today, many of them have options on a regular basis as well. Chef Praveen from Crowne Plaza says, "It is not just the desserts, a diabetic person should have a balanced diet by eating the right amount of protein and carbs. Even though we don't have it on the menu, we have many sugar-free options. But although we make dishes only on personal requests, with many of our patrons becoming health-conscious, it is important for us to have options at our restaurant, too." Talking about desserts, he says, "Nowadays, many Indian sweets can be made with healthy sweeteners. From carrot halwa to gulab jamun - we can make them in the healthiest possible way. We get cane sugar and a product called Dezire Sugar, in which the glycemic index is very low, among others." Chef Grzegorz Odolak of Park Hyatt adds, "From fresh fruit ice creams to cheesecakes - today we have many things we can include for diabetic people." Subrata Debnath from Hyatt Regency says, "We have a diet menu for people who are health-conscious. Instead of white rice, they can choose red rice, which is low on carbs. We also make oil-free, sugar-free sweets, and we en Continue reading >>

Diwali Recipes For Diabetic Patients

Diwali Recipes For Diabetic Patients

Sugar is an inseparable part of Diwali sweets. However, diabetic patients can prepare few sweets for Diwali using artificial sweeteners. Read on to find some recipes which can be prepared for Diabetic patients on the occasion of Diwali. Festival is a time when varieties of food items are served and it becomes difficult to refuse everything even for diabetic patients. Diabetics have to take utmost care of their diet always. Though it is health plan and taking care of yourself and your health, at times of festivals diabetics feel slightly depressed as they cannot have rich food items and sweets fearing increase in the their blood sugar level. If someone in your family is diabetic, you can help him have sweets and enjoy Diwali this year. There are plenty of recipes for diabetic patients and with the help of artificial sweetener you can make sweets and other traditional food items without much fuss and hassle. There are some tips that if the diabetics follow, they can manage and have some sweets too in the evening of Diwali. Diwali Recipes for Diabetic Patients Sugar is an inseparable part of sweets prepared on the occasion of Diwali. However, some sweets can be prepared using artificial sweeteners. Have a quick look at the recipes which can be prepared using artificial sweeteners. Kheer – This is a traditional Indian sweet preparation that is usually prepared on all festivals and special occasions in family. Boil one liter of milk and add a handful of raw rice to it after washing it with water. You need to keep stirring and also keep the flame low. Do not add artificial sweetener even when the rice is done. Let the milk get reduced to 2/3 rd or 1/2 as desired by the people you are going to serve. Add small pieces of different dry fruits to it at least 10 minutes before t Continue reading >>

Mango Oats Kulfi / Oats Icecream – Diabetic Friendly Dessert Recipes

Mango Oats Kulfi / Oats Icecream – Diabetic Friendly Dessert Recipes

How many of you love Kulfi ? I can hear many “Me ..Me.. ” there.. But how many of you avoid eating them these days cause of loads of sugar , khova , condensed milk etc going into it ? Hmm… kulfis are so addictive and tempting ..especially in this summer.. that its difficult to tell no too . But what about the weighing scale ? I am sure like me many of you face this dilemma often . I have some good news … you needn’t resist your Kulfi cravings anymore .. Here’s a diabetic friendly , weight watcher’s delight , kids friendly ” Sugarless Mango Oats Kulfi ” . Its creamy , rich , tasty and very very healthy … Few days back i saw this oats Kulfi recipe in Food Food’s Safolla Fit Foodie program .There chef Vikas Khanna used instant Fruit & Nuts- Cranberry flavor quick cooking oats .Now since Mango is in the season , i thought of using plain quick cooking oats and flavor it up with mango . When i served it to my family , everyone kept guessing the secret ingredient but couldn’t succeed .Finally when i revealed that it was made from oats , my hubby was so surprised and ate two extra Kulfis .Do try friends … you will love these healthy Mango Oats Kulfi … Continue reading >>

Locking Horns Over Diabetic Sweets

Locking Horns Over Diabetic Sweets

CHENNAI: The Madras High Court has passed an interim order restraining Adyar Ananda Bhavan, a chain of sweetshops, from selling sweets made with fructose/levulose because it infringed on a patent held by Diabetics Dezire, which makes sweets targeting the huge diabetic population in India. Diabetics Dezire holds a process patent for preparation of low-glycemic sweets for a 20-year period from February, 2004 and a product patent for the same period from July 2004. In an order dated January five, 2007, Madras High Court said that Diabetics Dezire has established a prima facie case on the strength of its two patent certificates, and restrained Adyar Ananda Bhavan from "making, using, selling or offering for sale of sweets made with fructose/levulose." Mr Justice S Rajeswaran, in an interim injunction, said, "In the present case it has not been established that the process in making a sweet with fructose and the alternate low-glycemic sweets made in this process are known to the entire world." "On the other hand, until such sweets made by the plaintiff, no such sweets were ever made. It is also established before me that even the defendant has started manufacturing sweets containing fructose only after the plaintiff's sweets hit the market," he added. When contacted, Adyar Ananda Bhavan managing director K T Srinivasa Raja said they would be filing an appeal soon. "We have been importing fructose from UK. Asking us not to make fructose-based sweets is like asking us not to use, say, Tata Salt," he told ET. He pointed out that Horlicks, Britannia and Amul too had product offerings - targeting the same market segment - that have fructose as an ingredient. The Rs 100 crore Adyar Ananda Bhavan had been offering three of its varieties, jangri, gulab jamun and dry-fruit sweets on Continue reading >>

5 Indian Sweet Dishes Diabetics Can Eat Guilt-free This Diwali

5 Indian Sweet Dishes Diabetics Can Eat Guilt-free This Diwali

It’s that time of the year when you just cannot avoid the temptation of sweets! But if you are a diabetic, you’re probably trying really hard to control that urge of taking that one last bite from the mithai ka dabba (there’s never just that ‘one last bite’ as we all know!). Yes, the words ‘sweet’ and ‘diabetic’ don’t go together, but trying out a few smart and healthy swaps can let you enjoy the sweeter pleasures of life this Diwali. Before we move on to some healthy recipe ideas, here are three easy tips and tricks that will let you eat sweets occasionally. 1. Share the sweets: Sharing helps build bonds. And sharing your sweet dish with someone can help build a great lifestyle change. So, pass the sweets around before you take a bite. This helps satiate your craving as well as reduces your consumption. 2. Use the artificial sweeteners wisely: Artificial sweeteners are a boon; however, they come with a word of caution. These are sweeter than refined table sugar and can make you crave sweets even more. Use them in moderation and keep the sweet level mild. 3. Try natural, healthy sweeteners: Jaggery (gur), dates (khajoor), raw honey (shahad) are great replacements for refined sugar. They have a lower GI score and also have vitamins and minerals that are good for you. Let’s get back to what we promised – delicious yet healthy sweet dish options for you to try this Diwali. 1. Phirni: This very popular Indian sweet is made here with gur, or jaggery, instead of sugar. Gur is rich in antioxidants as well as minerals such as selenium and zinc. It is also good for your overall health [1]. Courtesy: YouTube/Sanjeev Kapoor Khazana 2. Khajoor (dates) and nuts barfi: Using dates in your sweets is a great option as they are loaded with fibre (which will preve Continue reading >>

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

You might think a diabetes diagnosis means you’ll have to skip dessert forever. “Not so,” says Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, a certified diabetes educator at DuPage Medical Center in Chicago. “With a little planning, you can satisfy your sweet tooth while keeping your blood sugar under control.” But just how do you do that? There are several ways. Swap Other Carbs for Dessert “Everyone focuses on the sugar, but what’s really important is the total carbohydrates,” says Rondinelli-Hamilton, author of the American Diabetes Association cookbook Healthy Calendar Diabetic Cooking. “If you’d like to have a small piece of pie for dessert, skip the starchy vegetable during dinner,” she says. But she’s quick to point out that this isn’t something you should do on a regular basis. “Desserts and sweets don’t have the nutritional value that other foods do, so it’s best to save them for special occasions,” she says. Think Small Along with limiting how often you have dessert, you’ll also need to limit how much you eat -- and that can be a challenge. “Sugar sets off fireworks in your brain, making you crave more,” says Jessica Bennett, RD, a dietitian at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Fighting the urge to overdo it takes a lot of effort. But there are ways to make it a little easier. “Set yourself up for success by buying desserts that are packaged as a single serving, like a sugar-free fudge pop or a small square of dark chocolate,” Rondinelli-Hamilton says. And be realistic. “If you can’t have cake in the house without eating the whole thing, don’t buy a cake,” she says. When you go out, check the menu for miniature desserts. Many restaurants now offer treats served in small dishes or shot glasses. “If that’s not Continue reading >>

5 Low-cal Diwali Desserts To Keep Sugar In Control

5 Low-cal Diwali Desserts To Keep Sugar In Control

Got a sweet tooth? Enjoy these festive preparations without excess sugar and calorie intake! Don't we love this time of year! Lights, firecrackers, goodwill and of course, plenty of great food are what we look forward to every Diwali. The downside of that last fun factor, though is that we tend to overdo it with the sweets and end up packing on the pounds or aggravating chronic health conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol. But not to fear! This year, you can enjoy these low-cal desserts with significantly lessened sugar content -- here's how to prepare them. Ras Malai Ras Malai, originally from Orissa, is a very popular milk-based dessert. It consists of sugary, cream-coloured (it can be yellow too) balls of paneer (cottage cheese) soaked in malai (cream) and flavoured with cardamom. It is specially made during the festive season. Good for: Diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, healthy bones, women's health Health factor: Low sugar, low fat, low salt, high calcium, high protein, high minerals Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 20 minutes Ingredients (makes 20 pieces): 1 litre milk 1 tsp vinegar 1 tsp cornflour 1 cup water 10 almonds 1/2 cup sugar or sugar-free Natura powder Method: Boil 500 ml milk. Add vinegar, till paneer is separated. Switch the burner off and cover the paneer for a minute with a lid. Strain the water away. Do not press too hard on the strainer. Empty the paneer into a plate and add cornflour to it. Beat till it becomes a soft dough and make small balls out of it. In a pressure cooker, add water and sugar/ sugar-free powder. Let it boil. Put the paneer balls in and cover with the lid. Pressure cook till one whistle. Take the remaining 500 ml milk in a kadai and boil it. Remember to keep stirring the milk, or it will s Continue reading >>

Diabetic Recipes

Diabetic Recipes

HEADLINES: The term "diabetes mellitus" refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood glucose, commonly called blood sugar. Glucose is vital to your health because it's the main source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's your body's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the reasons may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.Recent research figures have shown that more Indians are turning to be diabetic. The diabetics should maintain a special diet so that their blood sugar levels are kept under control. But this does not mean that should not enjoy the tasty Indian recipes and fast for life. They can go in for many healthy recipes such as the ones listed below. Not only the diabetics but those intending to control their blood sugar levels shall benefit by these recipes. Diabetics usually get frustrated at the long list of food they need to avoid. The recipes here take into consideration their health as well as their taste buds.Diet is a key part of managing diabetes. SOYABEAN BIRYANI OATMEAL COOKIES TOMATO BAKED STRAWBERRY COOLER CHEESE POTATO WITH BROCCOLI SPINACH AND CARROT SANDWHICH CHANA DAL WITH CUCUMBER SOYA GRANULE UPMA RAJMA SAAGWALA BRAN BISCUITS SOYA VEGETABLE KORMA QUICK SOYA DOSAS Continue reading >>

(indian Diabetic Diet Recipes, Indian Style Diabetic Friendly Dishes)

(indian Diabetic Diet Recipes, Indian Style Diabetic Friendly Dishes)

Diabetes is a condition in which there is high sugar (glucose) level in the blood. The glucose comes from the food we eat. A hormone insulin produced by the pancreas is responsible for absorbing the glucose into our body cells. Diabetes can be caused by the pancreas not producing enough insulin (Type I) or due to insulin resistance (Type II) i.e. the body cells do not respond to the insulin produced.Diabetes causes frequent urination and increased hunger. A diabetic diet must include food with low glycemic index (GI). GI is an indication of how much the blood sugar level will rise when we eat something. Foods with low GI include fruits, vegetables,beans, oats and other whole grains. These are food which are high in vitamins and fiber content. If you have diabetes, try to restrict your diet to 1500-1800 calories in a day. Moderation is the key - eat everything in moderate quantities. Try to include lots of vegetables into your meal in order to increase the fiber content. For eg. : Try to use whole grain noodles or pastas, use brown rice to make all variety rice dishes and try to include lots of millets in your diet. In addition, try to include as many vegetables or sprouts as possible in the dish to increase the fiber content. Fruits are high in fiber too. However some fruits like mango, banana, grapes etc contain high sugar level. So consume these fruits in small portions. Our Indian diet is dominated by carbohydrates. As much as possible try to include more protein into your diet and reduce the carbohydrate intake. Also, try to expose your body to sunlight everyday and drink plenty of water. The Vitamin D that you get from sunlight is essential for a healthy life. Water helps in reducing the risk of many of the ailments related to diabetes. I have shared some Indian di Continue reading >>

Magaj For Diabetics (a Chick Pea Flour Sweet Suitable For Diabetics)

Magaj For Diabetics (a Chick Pea Flour Sweet Suitable For Diabetics)

Magaj is a popular Gujarati sweet usually made during the Diwali celebrations. I have been thinking about making some sweets which could be sitable for diabetics but have refrained from trying them out as a lot of Indian sweets require you to make a sugar syrup. Magaj is one sweet where you can add sugar at the end of the cooking so I decided to experiment and make a small batch. I would say – they turned out OK….may be 9 marks out of 10…. Now this is one sweet a diabetic can enjoy. Ingredients for 10 magaj: 2 cups of chick pea flour (also called gram flour or besan) 1 heaped cup of Sugar substitute (I used Splenda) 3/4 cup of ground almonds 1/4 cup sliced almonds 2 cups of ghee (clarified butter) 1 teaspoon of ground cardomon (Elchi) 1/2 cup milk Method: 1. Sieve the chick pea flour through a fine sieve 2. Take a 1/4 cup of milk and 1 tablespoon of ghee and add it to the chick pea flour. Using a spoon mix this up. 3. Cover this mixture and leave it for half and hour. 4. Stir this mixture and sieve through a large holed sieve. This gives the flour a nice grainy feel. 5. Once sieved -add one and a quarter cups ghee to the flour and cook it slowly on medium heat. 6. Continue to stir the mixture until it gets to a golden brown colour. This could take 15-20 minutes. 11. When the mixture is cool enough to handle – shape them into small round flat bottomed sweets. Sprinkle some sliced almonds on to the magaj. Note: when using a sugar substitute -the mixture may be a little dry and not bind together. If that happens, add a couple of tablespoons of milk or ghee to the mixture to enable you to make the magaj ladoos. Note: If you wish to use sugar – You may need three quarter cup of sugar (or one cup if you have a sweet tooth) which I suggest that you grind before addin Continue reading >>

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