diabetestalk.net

Indian Diabetes Risk Score Study

The Indian Diabetes Risk Score

The Indian Diabetes Risk Score

Cadi > Topic > Diabetes Epidemic in Indians > The Indian Diabetes Risk Score IDRS was developed using four simple parameters namely age, abdominal obesity, family history of diabetes, and physical activity. A maximum score of 100 is given for these categories combined as shown in the Figure 048. It has shown to be a highly cost effective way of testing for diabetes in a resource poor setting like India.IDRSalso helps to distinguish type 2 from non-type 2 diabetes mellitus.7 Subjects with an IDRS of <30 was categorized as low risk, 30-50 as medium risk and those with > 60 as high risk for diabetes. The mean IDRS increased significantly from normal (48) to prediabetes (57) to diabetics (61).1-3 Limiting the blood sugar testing to those with an IDRS score of 50 and above could identify more than 90% of Indians with diabetes and prediabetes.1-3 The Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) showed the strongest (5-fold risk) association with incident diabetes higher than obesity or hypertension.4-6 Obesity and abdominal obesity conferred a 2-fold risk of diabetes, whereas hypertension conferred a 3-fold risk of diabetes. 2, 3 Higher IDRS is also associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome and CVD risk even among people without prediabetes or diabetes.1 1.Mohan V, Sandeep S, Deepa M, Gokulakrishnan K, Datta M, Deepa R. A diabetes risk score helps identify metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk in Indians the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES-38). Diabetes, obesity & metabolism. May 2007;9(3):337-343. 2.Mohan V, Deepa M, Farooq S, Narayan KM, Datta M, Deepa R. Anthropometric cut points for identification of cardiometabolic risk factors in an urban Asian Indian population. Metabolism. Jul 2007;56(7):961-968. 3.Mohan V, Deepa M, Farooq S, Prabhakaran D, Reddy KS. Continue reading >>

Indian Diabetes Risk Score Helps To Distinguish Type 2 From Non-type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (gdrc-3)

Indian Diabetes Risk Score Helps To Distinguish Type 2 From Non-type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (gdrc-3)

Indian Diabetes Risk Score Helps to Distinguish Type 2 from Non-Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (GDRC-3) Kunal M Sharma , B.S., B.A.,1,2 Harish Ranjani , C.D.E., Ph.D.,1,3 Ha Nguyen , M.P.H.,1,4 Shuba Shetty , M.P.H.,1,4 Manjula Datta , M.D., D.C.H., M.Sc., FRCP,1,3 K M Venkat Narayan , M.D., M.B.A,1,4 and Viswanathan Mohan , M.D., Ph.D., D.Sc., FRCP, FNASc1,3 1Global Diabetes Research Center, Chennai, India 2Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 1Global Diabetes Research Center, Chennai, India 3Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, India 1Global Diabetes Research Center, Chennai, India 4Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GeorgiaA 1Global Diabetes Research Center, Chennai, India 4Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GeorgiaA 1Global Diabetes Research Center, Chennai, India 3Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, India 1Global Diabetes Research Center, Chennai, India 4Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GeorgiaA 1Global Diabetes Research Center, Chennai, India 3Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, India 1Global Diabetes Research Center, Chennai, India 2Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 3Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Chennai, India 4Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GeorgiaA Corresponding Author: Viswanathan Mohan, M.D., Ph.D., D.Sc., FRCP, FNASc, Director & Chief of Diabetes Research, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation & Dr. Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, 4 Conran Smith Road, Gopalapuram, Chennai 600 086, India; email address [email protected] Copyright 2011 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether th Continue reading >>

Indian Diabetic Risk Score (idrs), A Screening Tool For Detecting Undiagnosed Diabetes

Indian Diabetic Risk Score (idrs), A Screening Tool For Detecting Undiagnosed Diabetes

The results of this study indicate that a simple diabetes risk score, the IDRS has a high degree of sensitivity and specificity, accuracy for detecting undiagnosed diabetes in a community. This study shows that if the IDRS is applied in our population and a score > 60 is used, by screening 29.7% (i.e., near 1/3) of population, 62.2% of the people with undiagnosed diabetes in a population can be detected with a specificity of 73.7%. The IDRS is easy to administer and tabulate since all the points are in tens or multiples of tens. Thus it could be administered easily even in an epidemiological setting by a non-physician since it just involves collection of data on age, family history, physical activity and a single measurement of waist circumference. Its ease of administration and its accuracy makes it a useful screening test for diabetes. India has a population of nearly one billion with nearly 41 million people already having diabetes of whom almost half do not even know that they have diabetes. IDRS could thus be used as a good screening tool prior to doing blood sugar testing in our population. This could help reduce the costs of screening for diabetes by nearly 50% [3]. IDRS could also help to detect people at risk of having pre diabetes [4]. Moreover it could help people motivate for undergoing blood sugar testing. There are several other diabetes risk scores which have been found to be reliable in predicting diabetes mellitus and the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score [5], German Diabetes Risk Score [6], Dutch Diabetes Risk Score [7]and Diabetes Risk Score of Oman [8] are some of them. Various diabetes risk scores have incorporated parameters such as age, previously abnormal blood sugar, height, diabetes in family, physical activity, body weight, waist circumference food Continue reading >>

Quality Of Life And Indian Diabetes Risk Score Are Linked To Heart Rate Variability In Young Individuals With Prediabetes And Diabetes In India Keerthi Gs, Pal P, Pal Gk, Sahoo Jp, Sridhar Mg, Balachander J - Int J Clin Exp Physiol

Quality Of Life And Indian Diabetes Risk Score Are Linked To Heart Rate Variability In Young Individuals With Prediabetes And Diabetes In India Keerthi Gs, Pal P, Pal Gk, Sahoo Jp, Sridhar Mg, Balachander J - Int J Clin Exp Physiol

Background and Aim: Although diabetes is known to be associated with cardiac autonomic neuropathy and depressed quality of life (QoL) in terms of physical and psychological domains due to the disease duration and complications, till date no reports are available to show the link between QoL and Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) with cardiac autonomic neuropathy assessed with heart rate variability (HRV) in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and prediabetes without comorbidities. IDRS is known to predict cardiometabolic risks, neuropathy and future diabetes risk even in normoglycemic subjects. Hence, in this study, we have planned to assess the plausible link between QoL scale and IDRS with HRV in young Indian individuals with newly diagnosed diabetes and prediabetes. Methods: Among 328 (1845 years) age-matched individuals, 78 were included as controls, 126 in prediabetes group, and 124 in newly diagnosed diabetes group. Subject's QoL and IDRS were assessed by questionnaires, and resting HRV were recorded. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and fasting insulin was estimated, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. Independent association of ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power (LF: HF ratio) with other variables was analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results: HRV and QoL were significantly decreased; IDRS, FBG, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR were significantly increased in prediabetes and diabetes group compared to controls with an equal level of significance. Furthermore, these parameters showed significant difference that was more intense in diabetes group compared with prediabetes group. Conclusion: The association of sympathovagal imbalance in terms of LF: HF ratio with QoL and IDRS was found in Indian adults wi Continue reading >>

Expanding Role Of The Madras Diabetes Research Foundation - Indian Diabetes Risk Score In Clinical Practice Mohan V, Anbalagan Vp - Indian J Endocr Metab

Expanding Role Of The Madras Diabetes Research Foundation - Indian Diabetes Risk Score In Clinical Practice Mohan V, Anbalagan Vp - Indian J Endocr Metab

According to the Indian Council of Medical Research-Indian Diabetes study (ICMR-INDIAB), a national diabetes study, India currently has 62.4 million people with diabetes. [1] This is set to increase to over 100 million by 2030. [2] The majority of people with diabetes (>90%) have Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). While T2DM predominantly affects older individuals in developed countries, in developing nations like India, it affects the younger population in the prime of their working lives and thus poses an even greater threat to the health of these individuals. [1] , [3] This epidemic of diabetes is unfortunately paralleled by a corresponding increase in the prevalence of its complications, both microvascular and macrovascular, which account for much of the premature morbidity and mortality due to diabetes in India. [4] , [5] , [6] , [7] , [8] Given the rapid escalation of the diabetes epidemic, all levels of prevention (primary, secondary and tertiary diabetes prevention) need to be put into action simultaneously. Unfortunately, more than 50% of people with T2DM remain undiagnosed. [9] Thus the priority is to screen, diagnose and treat as many people with T2DM as possible. In a hugely populated country like India with over 1.2 billion people with diverse cultures, the screening and diagnosing methods for diabetes should be simple, cost-effective and less time-consuming and should also take into consideration the unique risk factors for, and increased susceptibility to, T2DM that the Asian Indians have. The latter is referred to as the "Asian Indian Phenotype". [9] , [10] The Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) was initially developed by us at the Madras Diabetes Research Foundation (MDRF, Chennai) as a simple tool to help detect undiagnosed T2DM in the community. [11] Others in I Continue reading >>

Performance Of Indian Diabetes Risk Score (idrs) As Screening Tool For Diabetes In An Urban Slum.

Performance Of Indian Diabetes Risk Score (idrs) As Screening Tool For Diabetes In An Urban Slum.

Performance of Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) as screening tool for diabetes in an urban slum. Dudeja P, et al. Med J Armed Forces India. 2017. Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune 411040, India. Clinical Tutor, Department of Community Medicine, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune 411040, India. Resident, Department of Community Medicine, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune 411040, India. Professor & Head, Department of Community Medicine, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune 411040, India. Med J Armed Forces India. 2017 Apr;73(2):123-128. doi: 10.1016/j.mjafi.2016.08.007. Epub 2016 Oct 18. BACKGROUND: India is diabetic capital of world, with maximum number of diabetic patients. There is large burden of undetected diabetic cases in community. There is increasing risk of diabetes in urban slum, because of illiteracy, lack of awareness, low socioeconomic status and unhealthy life style. Madras Diabetes Research Foundation (MDRF) has developed Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) to detect undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this article is to study the performance of IDRS as screening tool for undiagnosed cases of Type 2 diabetes and to find the prevalence of undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes in an urban slum. METHODS: Screening for diabetes was carried out in an urban slum. The sample size was 155 (assumed prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes 9%). IDRS tool comprising of two modifiable (waist circumference, physical activity) and two non-modifiable risk factors (age, family history) for diabetes was used to assess the risk of diabetes anthropometry data was obtained. Conformation of diabetes was done using blood sugar levels on fasting venous sample. RESULTS: Mean and SD for age of study subjects were 49.6814.80 years, BMI 26 Continue reading >>

Screening For Diabetes Using Indian Diabetes Risk Score - - Scopemed.org - Deposit For Medical Articles

Screening For Diabetes Using Indian Diabetes Risk Score - - Scopemed.org - Deposit For Medical Articles

Screening for diabetes using Indian diabetes risk score Saranya Nagalingam, Kavitha Sundaramoorthy, Balaji Arumugam. Background: Prevalence of type 2 diabetes has escalated to beyond the projected values in many countries like India, so it becomes mandatory to screen the population to recognize the disease early. This study was carried out with the objective of screening the adult population using the pre validated MDRF-IDRS questionnaire. Methods: This study was done among adult population as community based cross sectional study around semi urban population of Chennai near Ponamallee and Avadi. House to house survey was done and the population was randomly selected randomly among adults of more than 20 years of age and not a known diabetic patients. Results: Our study included 304 study participants with the mean age of 41.5 years, majority 55% females, 73% belonging to nuclear family and majority were from class II socio economic status. Around 74% were non vegetarian population with smoking and alcohol habits 20% and 23% respectively. According to IDRS score of MDRF the study population were classified to be low, medium and high risk for developing type 2 diabetes were 18%, 45% and 37% respectively. Conclusion: Our study has described that the majority of the adult population were at medium and high risk of developing type 2 diabetes which is actually a dangerous sign for the community, needing lifestyle changes to be initiated as soon as possible to delay the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. Key words: Type 2 diabetes, Screening, Indian diabetes risk score, BMI, Waist circumference Continue reading >>

Value Of Indian Diabetes Risk Score Among Medical Students And Its Correlation With Fasting Plasma Glucose, Blood Pressure And Lipid Profile

Value Of Indian Diabetes Risk Score Among Medical Students And Its Correlation With Fasting Plasma Glucose, Blood Pressure And Lipid Profile

Value of Indian Diabetes Risk Score among Medical Students and Its Correlation with Fasting Plasma Glucose, Blood Pressure and Lipid Profile 1 Medical Students, Department of Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India 2 Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India 3 Associate Professor of Statistics, Department of Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India 4 Medical Students, Department of Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India 5 Medical Students, Department of Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India 6 Medical Students, Department of Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India NAME, ADDRESS, E-MAIL ID OF THE CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Prabha Adhikari M.R., Professor of Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Hospital Attavar, Mangalore 575001 (India). Phone: 9880991290; Fax L 0824-2443203. E-mail: [email protected]_irakihda Received 2012 Mar 10; Revisions requested 2012 May 21; Accepted 2012 Aug 4. Copyright 2012 Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research The Indian Diabetes Risk Score is a tool which was devised by the Madras Diabetes Research Foundation to screen people for the risk of developing Diabetes mellitus; it comprises of the family history, the abdominal circumference, age and the physical activity. This study was aimed at finding out whether the Indian Diabetes Risk Score (MDRF) correlated with the blood sugar levels, the lipid profile and the blood pressure readings of medical students. Seventy five female and 75 male students who signed the informed consent were selected for the study. Their IDRS was calculated by using a validated questionnaire which involved the family history, the abdominal circumference, age and the details of the physical activity. All of th Continue reading >>

Validation Of Indian Diabetic Risk Score In Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Against High Fasting Blood Sugar Levels Among Adult Population Of Central India.

Validation Of Indian Diabetic Risk Score In Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Against High Fasting Blood Sugar Levels Among Adult Population Of Central India.

Globally the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is major public health concern. The Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) was developed by Madras Diabetes Research Foundation (MDRF) as a simple tool to help detect undiagnosed type 2 DM (T2DM) in the community. We conducted a study among 911 adults of Jabalpur District to validate the IDRS score against increased fasting blood sugar levels in diagnosing T2DM. T2DM was confirmed either by history of previously known disease or fasting plasma glucose 126 mg/dl on two occasions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, Youden index (sensitivity + specificity -1), likelihood ratio for positive test, and likelihood ratio for negative test were calculated for IDRS cut-offs of 20, 40, 60, and 80 against the presence of T2DM (either known diabetic or fasting plasma glucose >126 mg/dl on two occasions). The overall prevalence of T2DM was 9.99% (95% confidence interval, 8.04-11.94%). In the Receiver operating characteristic analysis, IDRS had an area under the curve of 0.736 (P < 0.001). The best cut-off was IDRS 40 with a sensitivity, specificity, and Youden index of 60.4%, 70.7%, and 0.31, respectively. The findings of our study indicate that IDRS has excellent predictive value for detecting undiagnosed diabetes in the community and IDRS is also a much stronger risk indicator than examining individual risk factors like age, family history, obesity, or physical activity. Continue reading >>

Validation Of The Mdrf-indian Diabetes Risk Score (idrs) In Another South Indian Population Through The Boloor Diabetes Study (bds).

Validation Of The Mdrf-indian Diabetes Risk Score (idrs) In Another South Indian Population Through The Boloor Diabetes Study (bds).

Validation of the MDRF-Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) in another south Indian population through the Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS). Selection Grade Lecturer in Biostatistics, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore 575001. To validate the MDRF-Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) in a south Indian population in coastal Karnataka. The study was conducted at Boloor locality in Mangalore on adults aged 20 years or more. The study group comprised 551 participants (68.9% response rate). The OGTT was performed using 75 gms of glucose. The MDRF-IDRS was calculated using age, family history of diabetes, physical activity and waist measurement. ROC curves were constructed to identify the optimum value (> or = 60%) of IDRS for determining diabetes as diagnosed using WHO consulting group criteria. We found that 71 of the study individuals were known diabetic subjects (KD) while 45 subjects were diagnosed to have newly diagnosed diabetes (NDD). An IDRS score of > or =60 had the best sensitivity (62.2%) and specificity of (73.7%) for detecting undiagnosed diabetes in this community. Our study confirms and validates the MDRF-IDRS as being a valid simple and reliable screening tool to identify undiagnosed diabetes in the community. The MDRF-IDRS score > or =60 had the highest sensitivity and specificity to identify undiagnosed diabetes. Continue reading >>

A Simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score For Screening For Undiagnosed Diabeticsubjects.

A Simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score For Screening For Undiagnosed Diabeticsubjects.

1. J Assoc Physicians India. 2005 Sep;53:759-63. A simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score for screening for undiagnosed diabeticsubjects. Mohan V(1), Deepa R, Deepa M, Somannavar S, Datta M. (1)Madras Diabetes Research Foundation and Dr MV Diabetes Specialities Centre, Gopalapuram, Chennai, India. AIM: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simplified IndianDiabetes Risk Score for detecting undiagnosed diabetes in India.METHODS: The risk score was derived from the Chennai Urban Rural EpidemiologyStudy (CURES), an ongoing epidemiological study on a representative population ofChennai. Phase 1 of CURES recruited 26,001 individuals, of whom every tenthsubject was requested to participate in Phase 3 for screening for diabetes using World Health Organization (WHO) 2 hour venous plasma glucose criteria [i.e. > or = 200 mg/dl]. The response rate was 90.4% (2350/2600). The Indian Diabetes RiskScore [IDRS] was developed based on results of multiple logistic regressionanalysis. Internal validation was performed on the same data.RESULTS: IDRS used four risk factors: age, abdominal obesity, family history ofdiabetes and physical activity. Beta co-efficients were derived based on amultiple logistic regression analysis using undiagnosed diabetes as the dependentvariable. The beta co-efficients were modified so as to obtain a maximum possiblescore of 100. Receiver Operating Characteristic [ROC] curves were constructed to identify the optimum value of IDRS for detecting diabetes by WHO consulting groupcriteria. Area under the curve for ROC was 0.698 (95% confidence interval (CI):0.663-0.733). An IDRS value > or = 60 had the optimum sensitivity (72.5%) andspecificity (60.1%) for determining undiagnosed diabetes with a positivepredictive value of 17.0%, negative predictive v Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of Indian Diabetic Risk Score For Screening Undiagnosed Diabetes Subjects In The Community | Lanord Stanley | Indian Journal Of Science And Technology

Evaluation Of Indian Diabetic Risk Score For Screening Undiagnosed Diabetes Subjects In The Community | Lanord Stanley | Indian Journal Of Science And Technology

Evaluation of Indian Diabetic Risk Score for Screening Undiagnosed Diabetes Subjects in the Community Department of Medicine, Tagore Medical College and Hospital, Chennai-600048, India Alliance University, Bangalore-562106, India GLR Laboratories Pvt Ltd, Chennai-600060, India A diabetic screening camp was conducted in villages around Tagore Medical College medical college, Chennai in India. Four simple questions along with one measurement for waist circumference and fasting capillary blood sugar and/or post prandial blood sugar tests in individuals with Indian Diabetic Risk Score (IDRS) 60 were employed. Results indicated that IDRS (consisting of factors like age, abdominal obesity, physical activity and family history) predicted the risk of diabetes mellitus with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 17.6% in individuals with score 60 and can be used as an effective tool for screening undiagnosed diabetics in the community. IDRS, Screening Tool, Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus, India Deepa M, Deepa R, Shanthirani CS, Manjula Dutta, Unwin NC, Kapur A and Mohan V (2005) Awareness and knowledge of Diabetes in Chennai- The Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES-9). J. Assoc. Physicians of India. 53, 283-287. Mohan V, Deepa R, Deepa M,Somannavar S and Datta M (2005) A simplified Indian diabetic risk score for screening undiagnosed diabetic subjects. J. Assoc. Physicians of India. 53,759-763. Nandeshwar S, Vishal Jamra and Pal DK (2010) Indian diabetes risk score for screening of undiagnosed diabetic subjects of Bhopal city. National J.Community Med. 1(2), 176-177. Prabha Adhikari, Rahul Pathak and Shashidhar Kotian (2010) Validation of the MDRF - Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) in another South Indian Population through the Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS). JAPI, 50, 4 Continue reading >>

Preventing Chronic Disease | Screening Performance Of Diabetes Risk Scores Among Asians And Whites In Rural Kerala, India - Cdc

Preventing Chronic Disease | Screening Performance Of Diabetes Risk Scores Among Asians And Whites In Rural Kerala, India - Cdc

Screening Performance of Diabetes Risk Scores Among Asians and Whites in Rural Kerala, India This page was updated on July 11, 2013, to incorporate the corrections in Vol. 10 Thirunavukkarasu Sathish, MBBS, MPH; Srinivasan Kannan, PhD; Sankara P. Sarma, PhD; Kavumpurathu Raman Thankappan, MD, MPH Suggested citation for this article: Sathish T, Kannan S, Sarma SP, Thankappan KR. Screening Performance of Diabetes Risk Scores Among Asians and Whites in Rural Kerala, India. [Erratum appears in Prev Chronic Dis 2013;10. .] Prev Chronic Dis 2012;10:120131. DOI: . We compared the screening performance of risk scores for Asians and whites for diabetes, dysglycemia, and metabolic syndrome. Our subjects were 451 people aged 15 to 64 years who participated in a cohort study from May 2003 through September 2010 in a rural area of the Thiruvananthapuram district of Kerala, India. All outcome measures showed overlap in the range of area under the receiver operating characteristic curves of Asian and white diabetes risk scores (DRSs). Asian and white DRSs performed similarly in rural India. Although mass screening for diabetes is not practical or recommended, selective screening through risk scores is feasible, convenient, and cost effective. Most diabetes risk scores (DRSs) have been developed and validated among whites (17); evidence on their screening performance in Asians is limited (8,9). We compared the screening performance of Asian and white DRSs for diabetes, dysglycemia, and metabolic syndrome in rural India. In 2003, a large-scale cross-sectional survey on risk factors for noncommunicable diseases was conducted among 7,449 people aged 15 to 64 years in urban, slum, and rural areas of the Thiruvananthapuram district of Kerala, India (10). From the rural sample of the survey Continue reading >>

Performance Of Indian Diabetes Risk Score (idrs) As Screening Tool For Diabetes In An Urban Slum

Performance Of Indian Diabetes Risk Score (idrs) As Screening Tool For Diabetes In An Urban Slum

Performance of Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) as screening tool for diabetes in an urban slum Puja Dudeja - Armed Forces Medical College Gurpreet Singh - Armed Forces Medical College Tukaram Gadekar - Armed Forces Medical College Sandip Mukherji - Armed Forces Medical College BACKGROUND: India is diabetic capital of world, with maximum number of diabetic patients. There is large burden of undetected diabetic cases in community. There is increasing risk of diabetes in urban slum, because of illiteracy, lack of awareness, low socioeconomic status and unhealthy life style. Madras Diabetes Research Foundation (MDRF) has developed Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) to detect undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this article is to study the performance of IDRS as screening tool for undiagnosed cases of Type 2 diabetes and to find the prevalence of undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes in an urban slum. METHODS: Screening for diabetes was carried out in an urban slum. The sample size was 155 (assumed prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes 9%). IDRS tool comprising of two modifiable (waist circumference, physical activity) and two non-modifiable risk factors (age, family history) for diabetes was used to assess the risk of diabetes anthropometry data was obtained. Conformation of diabetes was done using blood sugar levels on fasting venous sample. RESULTS: Mean and SD for age of study subjects were 49.6814.80 years, BMI 26.608.51kg/m2, waist hip ratio (females) 0.870.06cm, waist hip ratio (males) 0.950.06cm, waist circumference (females) 89.9910.95cm, waist circumference (males) 89.4410.9cm. IDRS predicted the risk of diabetes mellitus with sensitivity of 95.12% and specificity of 28.95% in individuals with score >60. CONCLUSION: IDRS can be used as an effective tool for screening undi Continue reading >>

Assessment Of Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes Using Simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score Community-based Cross-sectional Study - - Scopemed.org - Deposit For Medical Articles

Assessment Of Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes Using Simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score Community-based Cross-sectional Study - - Scopemed.org - Deposit For Medical Articles

Assessment of risk of type 2 diabetes using simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score Community-based cross-sectional study Krutarth R Brahmbhatt, Tamal Chakraborty, Chandana Gopal, Shwethashree M, Sajjan Madappady, Sowndarya TA, Bharani Kumar Anbalagan. Background: Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in India is 8.7%. Around 52% of the cases of diabetes among adults in India are undiagnosed. A simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) for screening of undiagnosed diabetic subjects was developed by Mohan Diabetes Foundation, Chennai. IDRS can be reliably used as an effective tool for the mass screening of diabetes in the community. Objectives: To assess the risk for type 2 diabetes among study participants using simplified version of IDRS and to estimate prevalence of abdominal obesity and physical activity among males and females. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in the field practice area of Urban Health Center of a medical college hospital in South India. Simple random sampling was performed to select the participants. Data collection tool had two parts. First part was about socio-demographic information and second part was Simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score. Pearsons Chi-square was used as a test of significance. P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Total 145 persons participated in the study. The prevalence of people at high risk of diabetes was 34% in the present study. The prevalence of abdominal obesity was 44% and 84% among males and females, respectively. Conclusion: One-third of the participants were at high risk for diabetes. IDRS is a simple and easy to use tool to assess the risk of diabetes in the community. Key words: Simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score, abdominal obesity, physical Continue reading >>

More in diabetes