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Importance Of Studying Diabetes

Treatment For Diabetes: Research Is Important

Treatment For Diabetes: Research Is Important

Treatment for Diabetes: Research is Important Categories: Diabetes Care Diabetes Research Diabetes Treatment The current treatment options for diabetes range from exercise and diet to medications multiple times per day. The actual treatment for one individual to the next remains relative to that individual and the progression of their particular case of diabetes. No one case of diabetes is the same and individuals respond differently to different treatments. Therefore, you should discuss with your physician your type 2 diabetes treatment options or type 1 diabetes treatment options. Type 1 Diabetes means that your body is not producing insulin. Insulin is your bodys way of taking glucose from the blood and bringing it into the cells. Without Insulin, this isnt possible and leads to high blood sugar. The treatment options for type 1 diabetics include blood glucose monitoring and medications because type 1 diabetes requires the use of insulin. Type 2 Diabetes is defined as a lack of or inability to use insulin. Depending on the progression of your type 2 diabetes, your treatment options will vary. Type 2 diabetics may still have the ability to produce insulin. If this is the case, exercise and diet may be a good treatment plan for them. If they are having trouble utilizing the insulin in their bodys, medication may be needed. As mentioned, your diabetes type 2 treatment options will vary. Some milder cases can be managed with healthy eating and exercise while others may require oral medications or insulin. It is important to reach your target blood glucose levels regularly. If this cannot be done through diet and exercise, oral medication and or insulin may be necessary to help. Some medications can be used in combination to increase the effectiveness of treatment. There Continue reading >>

Diabetes Control: Why It's Important

Diabetes Control: Why It's Important

People who have diabetes may hear or read a lot about controlling, or managing, the condition. But what is diabetes control and why is it so important? When you hear your doctors or health care providers talk about "diabetes control," they're usually referring to how close your blood sugar, or , is kept to the desired range. Having too much or too little sugar in your blood can make you feel sick now and cause health problems later. Managing diabetes is like a three-way balancing act: The medicines you take (insulin or pills), the food you eat, and the amount of exercise you getall need to be in sync. don't take diabetes medicines as directed don't follow the meal plan (like eating too much or not enough food without adjusting diabetes medicines) don't get regular exercise or exercise more or less than usual without making changes to the diabetes plan What Can Happen if Diabetes Is Not Under Control? Out-of-control blood sugar levels can lead to short-term problems like hypoglycemia , hyperglycemia , or diabetic ketoacidosis . In the long run, not controlling diabetes can damage important organs, like the heart, kidneys, eyes, and nerves. This means that heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems can happen to people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens who have had the disease for only a few years, but they can happen to adults with diabetes. Kids and teens with diabetes who don't control their blood sugar levels can be late going into puberty and might not end up as tall as they would have otherwise. The good news is that keeping blood sugar levels under control can help keep you healthy and prevent health problems from happening later. How Do I Know When My Diabetes Is Under Control? If you have diab Continue reading >>

Glycemic Control Is An Important Consideration In Diabetes Care

Glycemic Control Is An Important Consideration In Diabetes Care

Glycemic Control Is an Important Consideration in Diabetes Care Am Fam Physician.2014Oct15;90(8):524-526. Original article: Lending a Hand to Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Simple Way to Communicate Treatment Goals Available at: to the editor: We appreciate the recommendations in this editorial, and agree that smoking cessation, blood pressure control, the use of metformin (Glucophage) as first-line therapy for diabetes mellitus, and the addition of statins to prevent cardiovascular events are important. However, we disagree with some of the statements regarding the importance of glycemic control. We think that the statement in Figure 1 that glycemic control has no effect on mortality or clinically relevant complications is not supported by the existing evidence. The literature supports glycemic control (A1C less than 7%) to prevent the onset and progression of microvascular complications, which we think are clinically relevant. Glycemic control is directly associated with the onset and progression of retinopathy and nephropathy. 1 5 In addition, results from the 10-year follow-up of the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) found that patients with newly diagnosed diabetes who were randomized to the intensive treatment group (sulfonylurea, insulin, or metformin) had a decreased incidence of microvascular complications, myocardial infarction, and death from any cause. 3 Results of the ACCORD and ADVANCE studies indicated that patients with existing cardiovascular disease may not be candidates for intensive glycemic control. 4 , 5 However, newly diagnosed patients without significant microvascular or macrovascular complications can benefit from glycemic control in the short term (to prevent microvascular complications) and long term (to potentially prevent myocardia Continue reading >>

Importance Of Taking Diabetes Medications As Prescribed, Exercising And Managing Weight

Importance Of Taking Diabetes Medications As Prescribed, Exercising And Managing Weight

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Importance of taking diabetes medications as prescribed, exercising and managing weight Study highlights health system's ability to track important factors which can impact better blood sugar control People with diabetes who took their medications at least 80 percent of the time and people who exercised four or more times per week were at lower risk for poorly controlled blood sugar, according to a new study. People with diabetes who took their medications at least 80 percent of the time and people who exercised four or more times per week were at lower risk for poorly controlled blood sugar, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits. The study also finds that people who were clinically obese were at higher risk for poorly controlled blood sugar. Poorly controlled blood sugar can lead to complications including kidney disease, retinal damage, heart disease, hospitalization and death, according to the American Diabetes Association. The ADA estimates that about 29 million Americans have diabetes, and according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 21 percent of adults with diabetes have poorly controlled blood sugar. The study, which included nearly 20,000 patients from Kaiser Permanente in Oregon and Southwest Washington, is novel because researchers were able to track medication adherence using Kaiser Permanente's unique electronic health record system, which includes pharmacy refill data. Many prior studies relied on asking patients if they took their medications, which is less reliable than patients' medical records. "Our physicians can look at a patient's electronic medical record and quickly see how often patients are refilling thei Continue reading >>

The Importance And Strategy Of Diabetes Prevention

The Importance And Strategy Of Diabetes Prevention

The importance and strategy of diabetes prevention Copyright 2016 Chinese Medical Association. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (Diabetes has become one of the largest public health problems to date. Decreased physical activity, overnutrition, and nutrition transitions caused by changes in lifestyle contribute to the increasing incidence of chronic metabolic diseases as well as deaths related to them. The shift from undernutrition to overnutrition indicates that chronic diseases of affluence have become a public health problem; hence, sustainable health-related goals have been developed for the prevention of these diseases. Environmental factors and the gut microbiota influence metabolism in the human body. Several studies have proven that lifestyle interventions can effectively deter the progression of diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. If the window of prevention is shifted earlier, diabetes may become a fortuitous event. Effective prevention needs high attention from the government and the participation of all citizens. Concrete scientific and reasonable measures also need to be developed by experts and scholars. Keywords: Chronic metabolic diseases, Diabetes, Prevention For nearly half a century, along with the social development and lifestyle changes, chronic metabolic diseases, mainly obesity, type 2 diabetes, abnormal lipid metabolism, and coronary heart disease, have become diseases that threaten human health and are now one of the biggest public health problems. Statistics show that more than 2 billion people are overweight or obese, and nearly 400 million patients currently suffer from diabetes mellitus globally. 1 , 2 In 2010, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: The Importance Of The Production In Knowledge

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: The Importance Of The Production In Knowledge

1,3Secretaria Executiva da Pós-graduação stricto sensu. Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP). Recife, PE, Brasil. 2Professor da Pós-graduação stricto sensu. Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP). Recife, PE, Brasil. 4Editor Executivo. Revista Brasileira de Saúde Materno Infantil. Recife, PE, Brasil. 5Coordenador da Pós-graduação stricto sensu. Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP). Recife, PE, Brasil. In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted the word diabetes as its annual campaign and launched its first global report1 on the disease. This report relates diabetes mellitus (DM) as one of the main public health problems in the world and estimated a 422 million of diabetic individuals in 2014. According to the document,1 the overall prevalence of diabetes has almost doubled since 1980 from 4.7% to 8.5% in the adult population in 2014, generating a global expenditure of billion dollars spent with direct and indirect costs related to the disease.2 There are three main types of diabetes, type I, type II and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The latter is a frequent complication during pregnancy and is defined as at any degree of glucose intolerance with first recognition during pregnancy.3.4 The physiopathology of the disease is similar to type II diabetes mellitus associating to as insulin resistance as to the decrease of the pancreatic beta cells function.5-7 The GDM increases the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes as the maternal and perinatal mortality, miscarriage, macrosomia, tocotrauma, I.C.U. admissions, neonatal hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia, jaundice, infections and congenital malformations.8 In addition, this causes problems for the conceptus, as for an unfavorable env Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidities will continue to increase as the population ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications will need to be assessed in light of the newly identified comorbidities. Lifestyle change has been proven effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring at the national level. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program research trial demonstrated that lifestyle intervention had its greatest impact in older adults and was effective in all racial and ethnic groups. Translational studies of this work have also shown that delivery of the lifestyle intervention in group settings at the community level are also effective at reducing type 2 diabetes risk. The National Diabetes Prevention Program has now been established to implement the lifestyle intervention nationwide. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new laboratory based criteria, such as introducing the use of A1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or for recognizing high risk for type 2 diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate the introduction of type 2 diabetes prevention at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement of A1c may not be sensitive enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ultimately result in reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality-of-care indicators are currently under development and may help determine whether appropriate, timely, evidence-based care is linked to risk factor reduction. In addition, the scientific evid Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Monitoring Blood Glucose

The Importance Of Monitoring Blood Glucose

The Importance of Monitoring Blood Glucose It is estimated that diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, currently affects more than 195 million people worldwide. This figure is expected to rise to more than 330 million by 2030.1,2 The rise in type 1 diabetes has been linked to changing environmental factors,3 while the rise in type 2 diabetes is strongly associated with increasing rates of obesity.4 In people with normal glucose tolerance, blood glucose levels are automatically monitored and controlled by the body. After eating, the body releases enough insulin to keep the plasma glucose within a normal range that rarely rises above 7.8mmol/l (140mg/dl) and usually returns to pre-meal levels within two to three hours. In people with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes, the body has little or no automatic control of blood glucose levels. After eating, they often experience extended periods of elevated blood glucose levels. The chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes is associated with both micro- and macrovascular complications, which result in significant increases in morbidity and mortality. Improving glycemic control in diabetic patients has been shown to reduce these complications. Indeed, two large landmark randomized clinical trials, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)5 and the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS),6,7 confirmed the benefits of tight glycemic control in all patients with diabetes in terms of reducing the risk of macro-vascular complications.8 The level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is the preferred standard for assessing glycemic control. HbA1c values reflect the average blood glucose for the preceding three to four months. The upper normal limit for HbA1c is approximately 6%. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends an HbA1c tar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Research: A Perspective From The National Institute Of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases

Diabetes Research: A Perspective From The National Institute Of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases

Diabetes Research: A Perspective From the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. Corresponding author: Judith Fradkin, [email protected] . Received 2012 Mar 1; Accepted 2012 Oct 4. Copyright 2013 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. This is the third in a series of articles, invited by the editors of Diabetes, that describes the research programs and aims of organizations committed to funding and fostering diabetes-related research. The first piece, contributed by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, appeared in the January 2012 issue of Diabetes. The second piece that describes the American Diabetes Associations research program appeared in the June 2012 issues of Diabetes and Diabetes Care. The growing human and economic toll of diabetes has caused consternation worldwide. Not only is the number of people affected increasing at an alarming rate, but onset of the major forms of the disease occurs at ever younger ages. We now know that the reach of diabetes extends far beyond the classic acute metabolic and chronic vascular complications to increased risk of an ever-increasing array of conditions including Alzheimer disease, cancer, liver failure, bone fractures, depression, and hearing loss. In the U.S. one in three Medicare dollars is spent on care of people with diabetes, and the proportion of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk attributable to diabetes is ri Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Diabetes Mellitus In The Global Epidemic Of Cardiovascular Disease: The Case Of The State Of Qatar

The Importance Of Diabetes Mellitus In The Global Epidemic Of Cardiovascular Disease: The Case Of The State Of Qatar

The Importance of Diabetes Mellitus in the Global Epidemic of Cardiovascular Disease: The Case of the State of Qatar Alvin I. Mushlin , MD, ScM, (by invitation) Paul J. Christos , DrPH, MS, Laith Abu-Raddad , PhD, Hiam Chemaitelly , MSc, Dirk Deleu , MD, PhD, and Abdul Razak Gehani , MD Correspondence and reprint requests: Alvin I. Mushlin, MD, ScM, Professor and Chair, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical Center, 402 East 67th Street, New York, NY 10065, Phone: 646-962-8009, Fax: 646-962-0281, [email protected] Copyright 2012 The American Clinical and Climatological Association As a manifestation of the epidemiologic transition being experienced throughout the developing world, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing. However, whether an individual's risk of cardiovascular diseases as a consequence of DM is also higher in these countries is unknown. We conducted a case-control study at the medical center in the state of Qatar comparing the prevalence of DM in 512 patients who were admitted with acute myocardial infarctions (MI) and 262 cases of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) to 382 hospital and outpatient controls to calculate the odds ratios (OR) associated with DM for MI and CVA. The OR for MI was estimated to be 4.01 compared to 2.92 for other countries in the Middle East and 1.75 for North America. The OR was even higher for Qatari natives. Understanding the reasons for this increase, including genetic differences, lifestyle, and medical management issues, is critical for the design and prioritization of effective interventions. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a leading cause of death worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimated CVD mortality to be 17.1 million people in 2004 with 42% of these deaths attributed to Continue reading >>

Why Should You Consider Participating In Diabetes Research?

Why Should You Consider Participating In Diabetes Research?

Why Should You Consider Participating in Diabetes Research? Twitter Summary: Clinical trials need more participants. Why should you get involved? One in seven Americans now has diabetes . That means in an average room of 100 people, 14 will have diabetes. Take that same room in 2050, and some estimates indicate that as many as 33 people would have diabetes. We need more prevention, better treatments, and ultimately a cure. Studies are necessary to accomplish those goals, but one major challenge for researchers is finding people to participate. In this piece, we talk to leading diabetes researchers on why research is so critical, the benefits for patients, and ways to get involved. Note: Before enrolling in any study, please discuss the pros and cons carefully with a healthcare provider. Studies vary in their potential risks and benefits. A century ago,doctors and scientists had no universally established methods for determining how effective medical treatments were.While modern, controlled research trials date back as far as 1747 , a major milestone came in 1946with the first randomized "curative"clinical trial . The concept of randomization,inwhich peoplearerandomly assigned to a treatment groupand a control group to compare the results between the two, was originally introduced to clinical research in 1923 . This model was quickly adopted as the basis of clinical research, setting the stage for the continued development of the field. Over time, regulatory guidelines were introduced to protect participants. These rules include, but are not limited to, obtaining informed, voluntary consent from participants and terminating the study if it has demonstrated more harm than benefit .Today, institutional review boards (IRBs) perform ethical reviews of proposed research, wit Continue reading >>

Study: Importance Of Diabetes Education

Study: Importance Of Diabetes Education

Better diabetes education could lead to improved self-management and psychological wellbeing, a study has found. Presented today at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, the results show that more than a quarter (26%) of people in the UK have never attended a diabetes education programme. But 80% of people who have participated in such a programme found it valuable. The study represents opinions from more than 15,000 people either living with diabetes or caring for someone with the condition across 17 countries. Ingrid Willaing the study lead, hopes the results can “pave the way” for improving access to diabetes education. She said: “[Our study] shows that education plays a vital role in improving clinical outcomes and quality of life for people with diabetes.” The study also found that while approximately one in ten healthcare professionals (11%) have received training in the management of psychological aspects of diabetes, more than half (55%) stated they would like to receive more training in this area. Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetes Research So Important?

Why Is Diabetes Research So Important?

Diabetes is an extremely common disease, affecting a diverse age range of people across the world. Those who are diagnosed with diabetes experience significant health concerns because the disease itself has proven to be the catalyst for other health problems. Many individuals who struggle with obesity develop diabetes, and the disease kills more people every year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Complications from diabetes can vary, but; the most prevalent co-morbid conditions include: kidney disease, amputations, blindness, cardiovascular disease, obesity, hypertension, hypoglycemia, dyslipidemia, and risk of heart attack or stroke. How many people does diabetes effect? According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes affects nearly 29 million Americans. According to the World Health Organization, 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. Diabetes remains the 7thleading cause of death in America. Many individuals’ death certificates cite diabetes as the underlying cause of death. There are two primary types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition characterized by a lack of insulin production. This type of diabetes is frequently life-long, and cannot be prevented by lifestyle choices or exercise habits. Type 2 diabetes results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin. This is a much more commonly occurring type, with around 90% of all diabetes diagnoses being type 2. Most of the research being done is centered around this type of diabetes. A third type of diabetes, gestational diabetes, effects pregnant women, and is characterized by raised blood sugar. Americans diabetes expenses top hundreds of billions. Due to the widespread nature of the disease, people worldwide spend a lot of money on diabetes-related healthcare costs. In America, Continue reading >>

The Role Of Exercise And Nutrition In Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus Management

The Role Of Exercise And Nutrition In Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus Management

1MSc, PhD, Assistant Professor, Nursing School, University Of Peloponnese, Sparta, Greece 2RN, MSc, PhD, Nursing School, University οf Peloponnese, Sparta, Greeceo *Corresponding Author: Sofia Zyga Sparta, Greece E-mail: [email protected] Background:Type II diabetes mellitus is a public health problem in both developed and developing countries which has increased alarmingly, giving the disease the dimension of an epidemic. The etiology of diabetes is multifactorial involving genetic, environmental, and behavioral origins. The aim of present study was to review the role of exercise and nutrition in type II diabetes mellitus. Method and material:The method οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature which referred to exercise and nutrition in type II diabetes mellitus. Results : During recent years, the association between physical activity and type II diabetes mellitus management has been assessed by a number of studies. It is well established that physical activity produces general and specific health benefits for diabetic patients. The basic principles of an effective exercise program are the intensity, duration and frequency of exercise in an appropriate environment. Usually, low-intensity and long-duration exercise programs are considered the most suitable for diabetic patients. Regarding dietary choices, it is widely accepted that healthy nutrition is the basis for the treatment of type II diabetes since it contributes positively to the maintenance of blood glucose within normal range and minimizes the complications of the disease. Conclusions : As it is supported by published evidence, encouragement to adopt healthy dietary choices in conjunction with increase of physical activity and reduce of sedentary behaviors is a Continue reading >>

Why Study Diabetes?

Why Study Diabetes?

Diabetes is a devastating disease that affects more than 2 million Canadians and over 200 million people worldwide. Diabetes costs Canada an estimated $9 billion annually and the incidence of diabetes is increasing dramatically. Because of its chronic nature, the financial burden of diabetes approaches that of all cancers combined. Diabetes research continues to be under-funded. There are several forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, occurs when the body’s own immune system destroys the insulin secreting pancreatic beta-cells. Type 1 diabetes is the most severe form of the disease and requires multiple daily insulin injections for survival. Even with excellent glucose control, patients are at significant risk for developing debilitating complications. Type 2 diabetes, formally known as adult-onset diabetes, occurs when there are insufficient insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells for the body’s needs. Type 2 diabetes is commonly associated with obesity. There are other forms of diabetes caused by rare mutations in important genes. In all forms of diabetes, the exact causes remain unclear. Diabetes is clearly one of the most important medical problems of our time. We in the UBC Diabetes Research Group are trying to understand the causes of this disease well enough to design rational therapies to defeat it. More information on diabetes can be found at: www.diabetes.ca and www.jdrf.ca Continue reading >>

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