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Importance Of Bedtime Snack For Diabetics

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Low blood sugar during the night can be a concern for people with diabetes, especially those on insulin. A 2003 study published in "Diabetes Care" investigated the impact of snack composition on nightly blood sugars in adults with Type 1 diabetes. The researchers concluded that bedtime snacks consisting of a carbohydrate and protein worked best in preventing low blood sugars when the bedtime blood sugar was less than 126 mg/dL. Video of the Day Most bedtime snacks contain about 15 to 30 g of carbohydrate, or two servings of a carbohydrate-containing food, and a serving of protein. It is not quite understood why protein helps to prevent nightly hypoglycemia, according to the authors of the "Diabetes Care" study, but it is believed to be related to the way protein is metabolized. Cereal and milk provides both carbohydrate and protein. A good bedtime snack consists of 3/4-cup serving of whole-grain cereal and 1-cup of low-fat milk. During cold months, you can try 1/2 cup of hot cereal with 2 tbsp. of raisins and 1 cup of skim milk as a cereal bedtime snack. Crackers and Peanut Butter Crackers provide the carbohydrate and peanut butter provides the protein. Spread 12 whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter or you can also try six whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter and 1-cup of skim milk. Each of these snacks contain 30 g of carbohydrate. Sandwiches also make a good bedtime snack for diabetics. Choose lean sources of meat to decrease your intake of saturated fat. Too much saturated fat in the diet increases blood cholesterol levels, another risk factor for heart disease. Bedtime sandwich ideas include two slices of whole wheat bread with 1 oz. of turkey, 1 oz. of lean ham, 1oz. of low-fat cheese or 1 oz. of canned tuna packed in water mixed with 1 ts Continue reading >>

How To Snack In The Right Way If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

How To Snack In The Right Way If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

If it fits your meal plan, yogurt with fruit can be a good snack.Getty Images If you have type 2 diabetes, you don't need to include snacks in your daily diet, unless you're on a type of medication, such as insulin or sulfonylureas, that can cause hypoglycemia. However, snacksif they are healthy and part of the meal plan developed by your diabetes educator or dietitiancan help prevent blood glucose peaks and valleys, as well as overeating at mealtime. The trick is knowing which foods make a "good" snack, the right portion size, and how often you should eat between meals. Calculate snack carbohydrates and calories A good snack consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on the individual's meal plan and medication), according to Rosalia Doyle, RD, a nutritionist at the Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. Just like meals, snacks should aim for a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates (read the food label to get all the details). "At our clinic, every type 2 diabetic gets an individual meal plan when they see one of the registered dietitians. And snacking is important for some people because it helps to prevent the blood sugar from fluctuating," says Doyle. Doyle likes to incorporate snacks her clients enjoy, like yogurt with fruit, popcorn without butter, and berries. Despite the nutritional value of such snacks, this eating must also be monitored. Inappropriate snacking can contribute to obesity. One way to avoid harmful snacking is to understand portion sizes for both your snacks and meals, and to stick to the parameters. "Three cups of popcorn is the same serving as one slice of bread, and a great snack," says Doyle. Other snack ideas include high fiber cereal with soy milk, a Continue reading >>

Bedtime Snack - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Bedtime Snack - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I was just diagnosed. Is this important? When I did my 3 hour I stopped eating at 8p and had my test at 9a and my fasting number was 72. Today was my first day of logging my readings and my fasting miner was 91. I had a snack of an apple, cheese cubes, and macadamia nuts and stopped eating at 11p and tested at 7a. Just wondering if my fasting number is better with a longer break 8p-the morning or is it important for blood sugar levels to have a bedtime snack? Any advice is appreciated for this newbie :) My dr said bedtime snack is the most important as it help to stabilize your blood sugar over night...if i dont do it or do i smaller snack i really can tell a difference! The best thing that works for me is a half a turkey sandwhich which is really hard to force down at bedtime..i sometime do a slice of pb toast which is better but seems to not control my numbers as well I'm not sure really but I find my morning number is always better with a longer fast too. Sometimes 10-11 hrs. I think everyone is just different. I eat my snack around 830 and test between 6 and 730 I'm not sure if that would change your numbers or not... but my dietician said that if I'm not hungry, I don't need the snacks. So I'd say don't force yourself to eat. I wasn't doing a bedtime snack because I usually don'test dinner until 8 and then check my sugar at 10 and then I'm ready for bed. My fasting numbers were creeping up into the 90's. I then started eating a Greek yogurt and string cheese and now my numbers are in the 80's. It's hard to eat when your not hungry but if it keeps my fasting number lower I will do it! I think it's important to find a snack that works for you. I know when I first started testing my fasting numbers I tried eating a half an English muffin with peanut butter and my fas Continue reading >>

How To Choose A Supper Snack With Diabetes

How To Choose A Supper Snack With Diabetes

Snacking is actually an important part of diabetes diet. This is especially so for those who suffer from low blood sugar levels during sleep. Eating a small treat before bed can help to stabilize your blood sugar. It is important that you reach for foods that are not loaded calories. Some of the good snacks to consume before bedtime are those that combine protein, carbohydrates and a little healthy fat. When choosing a supper snack before bedtime, there are a few things to consider : Go for Carbohydrates with Few Calories and Sugar Carbohydrates which are low in calories and sugar are good options for their snacks just before bedtime. Some examples of carbohydrates that are low in calories and sugar include saltine crackers, fat free tortilla chips, and low fat popcorn. Fruits are a more diet friendly option as a supper snack. You can have grapes, apples, oranges and pears. These fruits can help curb your sweet cravings without altering your blood sugar level drastically. Protein Is Also Important Protein is also an important aspect of the diabetes diet. This is especially so as a nighttime snack because proteins help to counteract the carbohydrates and help keep blood glucose levels stable. Among the best examples of protein rich snacks that you can safely consume at bedtime are skim milk, cheese, cup of yogurt and peanut butter. Milk and yogurt double as sources of both proteins and carbohydrate which means that they can be consumed alone as snacks. The remaining two examples, cheese and peanut better, should be best consumed in minimal portions along with crackers. Include Small Amounts of Healthy Fats Bedtime snacks for diabetes should come with some healthy fats. These should not to be mistaken with junk foods that are rich in calories. Ice cream, cookies, potato c Continue reading >>

Does Everyone With Diabetes Need A Bedtime Snack?

Does Everyone With Diabetes Need A Bedtime Snack?

Are you one of those people who get a craving for ice cream right around 10 pm? Or maybe you like to munch on potato chips when watching late night TV? Snacking before bedtime can be a guilty pleasure, but people with diabetes are often told to include it in their meal plans. Is this something that every person with diabetes really needs? Diabetes Meal Planning has Changed In the past, people who were diagnosed with diabetes were often given vague directions about meal planning, with little attention paid to their personal goals. Most people were told to have 3 meals and 3 snacks per day, without much guidance on exactly what and when to eat. Times have changed, and thankfully so have diabetes meal-planning guidelines. Nowadays, meal plans are much more flexible and individualized. Similarly, the decision to include a bedtime snack in your diet depends on many things – blood sugar levels, weight management goals, and your eating schedule. Blood sugar levels at bedtime are particularly important to look at. A study in the Journal of Diabetes Care recommends having a snack if your blood sugar is less than 126 mg/dl, but to avoid snacking if your blood sugar is higher than 180 mg/dl. Why is Snacking Important for People with Diabetes? Some people with diabetes may develop what’s called nocturnal hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) while they sleep. If your blood sugar at bedtime is low – i.e., less than 126 mg/dl ? then a snack can help to prevent this nighttime dip. But be wise about your snack selection: this isn’t a green light to eat just anything. It’s important to choose a snack that is low in calories, as well as a healthy source of carbohydrate and protein. Best Bedtime Snacks A general rule of thumb is 15-30 grams of carbs and about an ounce (7 grams) of prot Continue reading >>

Ask Joslin: Should You Snack?

Ask Joslin: Should You Snack?

Are bedtime snacks, or, for that matter, any snacks required if you have diabetes? Let’s tackle the question of the bedtime snack first. If you have diabetes and have ever been hospitalized, you are probably familiar with the often unrequested delivery of the ubiquitous bedtime snack consisting of graham crackers and milk, or some equally uninspiring repast. The genesis of this tradition has to do with the use of peaked intermediate and long-acting basal insulin. Until the year 2000, there weren’t any insulins that provided a consistent level of medicine throughout their duration of action. Meals and snacks were scheduled around the times the insulin was peaking. Many people used NPH, an insulin that peaks anywhere from four to eight hours after it is injected, as their basal insulin. Bedtime snacks were given to prevent patients from having low blood glucose reactions overnight. Today, our basal insulins have the advantage of being peakless or flat. They provide the same amount of insulin every hour for the duration of their physiological life. This is a big advantage over some of the early intermediate- or long-acting insulins since it is no longer necessary to stick to a rigid schedule for meal times and a bedtime snack isn’t usually required. Some people still use NPH insulin and, as many hospital food service departments are not privy to the medication inventory of their patients, they take a safety approach of providing bedtime snacks to all their patients with carbohydrate controlled therapeutic diets. There are times when bedtime snacks are important. People who experience a lag effect from exercise may benefit from consuming a bedtime snack to avoid overnight hypoglycemia. In addition, blood glucose can drop precipitously overnight in some elderly patient Continue reading >>

Impact Of Bedtime Snacks On Glucose Control In Type 2 Diabetes

Impact Of Bedtime Snacks On Glucose Control In Type 2 Diabetes

Approximately 3 million Canadians have type 2 diabetes, a condition where the blood sugar levels are too high, uncontrolled blood sugars lead to cardiovascular disease and other complications. Patients with type 2 diabetes are often advised to consume a snack before bed in order to help control morning blood sugar levels. However, scientific evidence for this dietary approach is limited and there is no data to help elucidate what the ideal bedtime snack is. We hypothesize that a high protein, high fat snack with very little carbohydrate, will be an effective bedtime snack for lowering morning glucose without spiking glucose levels in the night. In this study we will determine if a bedtime snack that is high in protein and fat but low in carbohydrate can help improve morning glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes. This information will provide scientific evidence for the potential health benefits of strategically-timed high protein, high fat snack consumption in people with type 2 diabetes. Fifteen patients with physician diagnosed type 2 diabetes (HbA1c 6.5-9%), between the ages of 30-80 years, and not on exogenous insulin therapy, will complete three, 3-day intervention periods (proof-of-concept randomized trial). Participants will consume a standardized diet for three days with either i) two hard-boiled eggs, ii) fruit yogurt; or iii) control no-bedtime snack, thirty minutes prior to bedtime. Fasting blood samples will be obtained on Day 4 in the morning after following each 3-day dietary intervention. Blood glucose will be monitored continuously across the intervention period using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). CGM allows for the moment-to-moment changes in blood glucose to be examined for several days, allowing the unique opportunity to examine the gl Continue reading >>

Snacking When You Have Diabetes

Snacking When You Have Diabetes

Learning how to count the carbohydrates that you eat (carb counting) helps you plan what to eat. It will also keep your blood sugar under control. Your health care provider may tell you to eat a snack at certain times of the day, most often at bedtime. This helps keep your blood sugar from getting too low at night. Other times, you may have a snack before or during exercise for the same reason. Ask your provider about the snacks you can and you can't have. Needing to snack to prevent low blood sugar has become much less common because of new types of insulin that are better at matching the insulin your body needs at specific times. If you have type 2 diabetes and are taking insulin and often need to snack during the day, your doses of insulin may be too high and you should talk to your provider about this. You will also need to ask about what snacks to avoid. Your provider can tell you if you should snack at certain times to keep from having low blood sugar. This will be based on your: Diabetes treatment plan from your provider Expected physical activity Lifestyle Low blood sugar pattern Most often, your snacks will be easy to digest foods that have 15 to 45 grams of carbohydrates. Snack foods that have 15 grams (g) of carbohydrates are: Half cup (107 g) of canned fruit (without the juice or syrup) Half banana One medium apple One cup (173 g) melon balls Two small cookies Ten potato chips (varies with size of chips) Six jelly beans (varies with size of pieces) Having diabetes does not mean that you must stop eating snacks. It does mean that you should know what a snack does to your blood sugar. You also need to know what healthy snacks are so you can choose a snack that will not raise your blood sugar or make you gain weight. Ask your provider about what snacks you can Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 12/21/2010 Whether you want to lose weight or simply eat healthier, enjoying a couple of snacks each day is a smart habit for many people. Eating a planned snack between meals can help curb your hunger (and therefore prevent overeating at mealtime) and also increase your energy levels when you need a boost. Snacks offer an additional benefit for people with type 2 diabetes: They can help optimize your blood glucose control. So if you haven't incorporated snacks into your diabetes meal plan yet, now may be the time to start. Here's what you need to know to snack smart, along with some carbohydrate-controlled snack ideas you can try today! The number of snacks a person with diabetes should eat during the day depends largely on your eating preferences, your weight-management goals, and the timing of your major meals. People with diabetes can eat snacks throughout the day for a number of reasonssimply enjoying a mid-morning snack or planning them into their day for better blood glucose control. Exactly how many snacks you should eatand when you eat themis very individualized. Meeting with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator is the best way to make sure your diabetes meal plan meets your needs. However, here are a few basic guidelines that can be helpful when planning snacks. How many hours pass between your meals? In general, people with diabetes who want to optimize blood glucose control should not go longer than five hours without eating. If you consistently eat your main meals every 4 to 5 hours, then you may not need any snacks between meals. However, if your main meals are generally spaced out at longer intervals, snacking between meals can help you achieve your best blood glucose c Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Snack Before Bed

Type 2 Diabetes Snack Before Bed

If you have type-2 diabetes, eating right is very important to help manage the disease. But this doesnt mean that you also need to stop eating snacks. Even snacking between meals or before bed is often recommended when you take insulin treatment. Just make sure that your choice is healthy and has least effect on blood sugar. Its very important for diabetics to manage their blood sugar as well. As long as they can keep it normal, there is nothing to worry. On the other hand, poorly-controlled high blood sugar is to blame for the diabetic complications to occur! Diabetes can be dangerous when it has caused its complications which some are life-threatening. The complications include cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, neuropathy (nerve damage), eye problems (blindness in worst scenario), kidney disease, and diabetic ketoacidosis. If you have diabetes, your diet is the core of treatment plan to cope with the disease. What you eat can affect your blood sugar. Therefore, eating right is important step for managing the disease. How about snacks? When it comes to snacking, what most people think are usually foods high in fats, carbohydrates, calories, or even sugars. But there lots of other options which some are healthy and safe for your blood sugar. Eating snack is not off-limits if youre a diabetic. Even there a number of benefits from eating snack for diabetics. If it is healthy or part of your meal plan made by your dietitian, it does help manage your blood sugar as well as avoid binge at mealtime. For many people with diabetes, snacks do help manage the disease and curb their hunger. There are lots of healthy snacks to choose from. But for diabetes, just remember the following key points: First, you need to know which a good and safe snack for your diabetes! The kind Continue reading >>

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes Written by Brianna Elliott, RD on January 14, 2018 Choosing healthy snacks can be difficult when you have diabetes. The key is to choose snacks that are high in fiber, protein and healthy fats. These nutrients will help keep your blood sugar levels under control. Its also important to snack on nutrient-dense foods that promote overall health. This article discusses 21 excellent snacks to eat if you have diabetes. Hard-boiled eggs are a super healthy snack for people with diabetes. Their protein content really makes them shine. One large hard-boiled egg provides 6 grams of protein, which is helpful for diabetes because it keeps your blood sugar from rising too high after you eat ( 1 , 2 ). In one study, 65 people with type 2 diabetes ate two eggs daily for 12 weeks. By the end of the study, they experienced significant reductions in their fasting blood sugar levels. They also had lower hemoglobin A1c, which is a measure of long-term blood sugar control ( 3 ). Eggs are known to promote fullness, an important aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. This disease is associated with a greater likelihood of becoming overweight and developing heart disease ( 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ). You can enjoy a hard-boiled egg or two for a snack on their own, or garnish them with a healthy topping like guacamole. Yogurt with berries is an excellent diabetes-friendly snack for a variety of reasons. First, the antioxidants in berries may reduce inflammation and prevent damage to cells of the pancreas, the organ responsible for releasing hormones that lower blood sugar levels ( 8 , 9 ). Additionally, berries are a great source of fiber. For example, a 1-cup (148-gram) serving of blueberries provides 4 grams of fiber, which helps slow digestion and stabilize bl Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy snack ideas for people with type 2 diabetes Small Snacks If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, youll find many healthy ideas below. Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canadas Food Guide . The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Heres a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate -rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats , barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL ( cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL ( cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 1 single-serve (125 mL) unsweetened applesauce sp Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Bedtime Snacks

Type 1 Diabetes And Bedtime Snacks

With type 1 diabetes we never let our guard down- especially in the middle of the night. One of the most vulnerable times people may encounter is during sleep which brings about the importance of a bedtime snack. Safety with type 1 diabetes is always paramount. When we are at rest, our awake clues of hypoglycemia become dampened. Lets look at the importance of a solid bedtime snack with recommendations from Sara Pinson, Registered Dietician (RD). Important food qualities to look for in a bedtime snack with type 1 diabetes According to Sara Pinson, RD there are differences in the food choices we make at bedtime to help stabilize our blood sugars overnight. She suggests combining foods that include both a carbohydrate and a protein to help sustain blood sugars overnight. Sara states: “Carbohydrates that are fiber rich will also keep kids feeling full and decrease the speed at which the sugar travels into the blood stream, helping to combat swings in those in the middle of the night blood sugars.” Top suggestions for a bedtime snack with type 1 diabetes (these are also gluten-free) 1 Cup of homemade trail mix (Kix cereal, rice or corn Chex cereal, unsalted almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pumpkin seeds and a few raisins on top) Cheese (cubed, string) with apple or cucumber slices Boiled egg with a handful of popcorn 1/2 cup of edamame Celery or apple with 1 tbsp of peanut butter or almond butter on top 1/4 cup of hummus and veggies Lowfat or plain greek yogurt 1 whole wheat gluten free waffle with fresh fruit 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese with a tbsp of walnuts and fresh sliced berries 1-2 slices of gluten free deli meat with a handful of grapes or get famcy and make lettuce wraps with sliced bell peppers in between Whole grain gluten free crackers with cream cheese on top Continue reading >>

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