diabetestalk.net

Impaired Fasting Glucose Diet And Exercise

Pre-diabetes: You Can Turn It Around

Pre-diabetes: You Can Turn It Around

The simple lifestyle changes that can reverse pre-diabetes and keep you healthy for life. A staggering 1.7 million Australians are estimated to have pre-diabetes, the condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes. The good news? It is possible to turn prediabetes around with some key diet and lifestyle changes. HFG dietitian Zoe Wilson investigates. The statistics are sobering. Here in Australia, an estimated 1.5 million people are currently living with diabetes – about half of whom don’t know it. And around 275 of us develop diabetes every day. What you may not know is that there is a condition called pre-diabetes, which – if diagnosed and managed with some key diet and lifestyle changes – can be prevented from developing into type 2 diabetes. Additionally, those same changes can help in the management of type 2 diabetes. Read on to find out how to improve your odds of beating pre-diabetes and how to make the lifestyle and diet changes that can help manage the disease. The rise of pre-diabetes: Are you at risk? In the past few years, pre-diabetes has come into the spotlight due to a combination of the rising incidence of obesity and greater awareness of type 2 diabetes, leading to more frequent testing. Pre-diabetes is the umbrella term for the conditions Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). It occurs when Blood Glucose Levels (BGLs) are higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose as diabetes. While awareness is on the rise, many people with pre-diabetes are undiagnosed and those that are, are often only diagnosed by accident during a routine blood test. Symptoms are not always obvious, so if you have two or more of the following risk factors, see your doctor about being tested. Risk factors of pre-diabetes or type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Fasting Hyperglycemia Blunts The Reversal Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance After Exercise Training In Obese Older Adults

Fasting Hyperglycemia Blunts The Reversal Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance After Exercise Training In Obese Older Adults

Fasting hyperglycemia blunts the reversal of impaired glucose tolerance after exercise training in obese older adults We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Fasting hyperglycemia blunts the reversal of impaired glucose tolerance after exercise training in obese older adults Steven K. Malin, Ph.D. and John P. Kirwan, Ph.D. Lifestyle modification, consisting of exercise and weight loss, delays the progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, no study has determined the efficacy of exercise training on glucose metabolism in the different prediabetes subtypes. Seventy-six older (65.1 0.6yr) obese adults with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n=12), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n=9), and combined glucose intolerance (IFG+IGT = CGI; n=22) were compared to normal glucose tolerant (NGT; n=15) and T2D (n=18) groups after 12 weeks of exercise training (60 min/d for 5d/wk at ~85% HRmax). An oral glucose tolerance test was used to assess glucose levels. Insulin sensitivity (euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp at 40 mU/m2min1), -cell function (glucose stimulated insulin secretion corrected for insulin sensitivity), body composition (hydrostatic weighing/CT scan), and cardiovascular fitness (treadmill VO2max) were also assessed. Exercise training reduced weight and increased cardiovascular fitness (p < 0.05). Exercise training lowered fasting glucose levels in IFG, CGI and T2D (p < 0.05) and 2-hour glucose levels in Continue reading >>

Approach To Dysglycemia: Do We Need To Treat Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose? - Sciencedirect

Approach To Dysglycemia: Do We Need To Treat Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose? - Sciencedirect

Volume 1, Issue 1 , April 2009, Pages 22-25 Author links open overlay panel Mousa A.Abujbara Kamel M.Ajlouni Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) are not only a surrogate for the state of insulin resistance but are also associated with the microvascular and macrovascular complications traditionally linked to diabetes. They predict an increased risk for death and morbidity due to cardiovascular disease. There is growing evidence that early detection of this state of pre-diabetes enables us to limit these recognized complications and perhaps to halt the progression to diabetes. For all pre-diabetes patients life style modifications, emphasizing modest weight loss & moderate physical activity are strongly recommended. Pharmacological intervention may also be necessary. Many studies have shown several drugs, both antidiabetic and nonhypoglycemic agents to be useful. If pharmacological treatment is required, Metformin is considered the first choice because of its safety, tolerability, efficacy and low cost. Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glucose Diagnosis

Impaired Fasting Glucose Diagnosis

What You Need to Know about Impaired Fasting Glucose Impaired fasting glucose occurs when the bodys fasting blood glucose level is higher than it should be. Usually, people with impaired fasting glucose are considered to be pre-diabetic. Because this type of condition may lead to diabetes mellitus, a diagnosis of impaired fasting glucose is normally accompanied by a doctors advice regarding lifestyle changes which may be undertaken in order to reduce the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. For example, regular exercise and a careful diet may be suggested. People who suffer from impaired fasting glucose (in other words, pre-diabetics) have a fifty-fifty chance of developing diabetes over a ten-year period. Some people will get diabetes even sooner (typically, within three years or less). Normal ranges for fasting glucose differ from country to country. Therefore, its important to see a licensed physician in your nation when you suspect that youre having problems with blood sugar. Your physician will know the correct criteria for fasting glucose diagnosis, as well as the proper test to give in order to confirm or exclude the presence of a pre-diabetic condition. How to Recognize the Symptoms of Impaired Fasting Glucose Unfortunately, its very difficult to know if youre pre-diabetic, as there are no outward symptoms. However, anyone who is concerned about impaired fasting glucose levels and the threat of developing diabetes should be aware of the signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus. These signs and symptoms consist of constant hunger, mysterious weight loss or weight gain, flu-like weakness and tiredness, slow healing of cuts and bruises, tingling in the hands and feet, gum and skin problems and vaginal/bladder infections that tend to recur Why Does Impaired Fasting Continue reading >>

How Can We Keep Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose From Progressing To Diabetes?

How Can We Keep Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose From Progressing To Diabetes?

How can we keep impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose from progressing to diabetes? J Fam Pract. 2010 September;59(9):532-533 1. Orozco LJ, Buchleitner AM, Gimenez-Perez G, et al. Exercise or exercise and diet for preventing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;3:CD003054.- 2. Gillies CL, Abrams KR, Lambert PC, et al. Pharmacological and lifestyle interventions to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose tolerance: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2007;334:299.- 3. Van de Laar FA, Lucassen PL, Akkermans RP, et al. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors for people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting blood glucose. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006;4:CD005061.- 4. Gerstein HC, Yusuf S, Bosch J, et al. DREAM (Diabetes Reduction Assessment with ramipril and rosiglitazone Medication) Trial Investigators Effect of rosiglitazone on the frequency of diabetes in patients with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2006;368:1096-1105. 5. Lago RM, Singh PP, Nesto RW. Congestive heart failure and cardiovascular death in patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes given thiazolidinediones: a meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. Lancet. 2007;370:1129-1136. 6. Abuissa H, Jones PG, Marso SP, et al. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers for prevention of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005;46:821-826. 7. Bosch J, Yusuf S, Gerstein HC. DREAM Trial Investigators Effect of ramipril on the incidence of diabetes. N Engl J Med. 2006;355:1551-1562. 8. American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes2009. Diabetes Care. 2009;32:S13-S61. LIFESTYLE Continue reading >>

The Role Of Physical Activity In The Management Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance: A Systematic Review

The Role Of Physical Activity In The Management Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance: A Systematic Review

The role of physical activity in the management of impaired glucose tolerance: a systematic review 1School of Sports and Exercise Sciences, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU UK 2Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK 3Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Although physical activity is widely reported to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in individuals with prediabetes, few studies have examined this issue independently of other lifestyle modifications. The aim of this review is to conduct a systematic review of controlled trials to determine the independent effect of exercise on glucose levels and risk of type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes (IGT and/or IFG). A detailed search of MEDLINE (19662006) and EMBASE (19802006) found 279 potentially relevant studies, eight of which met the inclusion criteria for this review. All eight studies were controlled trials in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. Seven studies used a multi-component lifestyle intervention that included exercise, diet and weight loss goals and one used a structured exercise training intervention. Four studies used the incidence of diabetes over the course of the study as an outcome variable and four relied on 2-h plasma glucose as an outcome measure. In the four studies that measured the incidence of diabetes as an outcome, the risk of diabetes was reduced by approximately 50% (range 4263%); as these studies reported only small changes in physical activity levels, the reduced risk of diabetes is likely to be attributable to factors other than physical activity. In the remaining four studies, only one reported significant impr Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes describes a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, although not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes has no signs or symptoms. People with pre-diabetes have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular (heart and circulation) disease. Two million Australians have pre-diabetes and are at high-risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Without sustained lifestyle changes, including healthy eating, increased activity and losing weight, approximately one in three people with pre-diabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes. There are two pre-diabetes conditions: Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is where blood glucose levels are escalated in the fasting state but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. It is possible to have both Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) Risk factors for pre-diabetes are similar to those for type 2 diabetes which are: Being overweight – especially those who have excess weight around the waistline (ie: more than 94cm for men and more than 80cm for women). Being physically inactive. Having high triglycerides and low HDL-C (good cholesterol) and/or high total cholesterol. Having high blood pressure. Having a family history of type 2 diabetes and/or heart disease. Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome*. Women who have had diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) or given birth to a big baby (more than 4.5kgs). Those from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background. Those from certain ethnic backgrounds such as the Pacific Islands, Asia and the Indian sub-continent. For more information refer to Continue reading >>

You Can Avoid Pre-diabetes With Small Changes To Your Diet

You Can Avoid Pre-diabetes With Small Changes To Your Diet

Charity Diabetes UK estimates that up to 11.5 million people in the UK are at a high risk of developing it. This statistic is backed up by research published last year in online medical journal BMJ Open which estimates a third of UK adults are at the stage known as pre-diabetes. If you’re one of them or think you might be, the main thing to know is that pre-diabetes can be reversed. In fact, it takes only simple lifestyle changes to cut your risk of going on to develop Type 2 diabetes. So what does the term mean? Although not a medically recognised condition, pre-diabetes is a term used when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal, yet not high enough for the full diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Being told you have pre-diabetes serves as a warning that you’re at increased risk of developing the condition. It has other health implications, too, for example it raises risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and stroke. Incredible celebrity weight loss transformations Wed, June 28, 2017 Incredible celebrity weight loss transformations. If you’re diagnosed with pre-diabetes (also called impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance) but don’t have any signs of Type 2 diabetes, you’re likely to be seen every one to three years by your doctor, depending on your blood sugar levels. Now’s the time to take steps to reduce your risk. Diabetes UK is encouraging people to find out their level of risk of developing Type 2 and whether they have pre-diabetes. There is a quick Know Your Risk quiz on the charity’s website (diabetes.org.uk/risk) or you can check at your pharmacy or GP surgery. If you do discover you’re at risk, it means you’ll be able to get support and regular check-ups from your doctor. The biggest risk factor for Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

People with IGT have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to say they have diabetes. This condition is diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). After a fast of 8 to12 hours, a person's blood glucose is measured before and 2 hours after drinking a glucose-containing solution. In normal glucose tolerance, blood glucose rises no higher than 140 mg/dl 2 hours after the drink. In impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), the 2-hour blood glucose is between 140 and 199 mg/dl. If the 2-hour blood glucose rises to 200 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. How does the fasting blood glucose test differ from the oral glucose tolerance test? In the fasting blood glucose test, a person's blood glucose is measured after a fast of 8 to 12 hours: A person with normal blood glucose has a blood glucose level below 100. A person with impaired fasting glucose has a blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level rises to126 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. The OGTT includes measures of blood glucose levels after a fast and after a glucose challenge. In 1997, an American Diabetes Association (ADA) expert panel recommended that doctors use the fasting blood glucose test to screen their patients for diabetes because the test is easier and less costly than the OGTT. Though the fasting glucose test detects most diabetes cases, the OGTT is more sensitive in identifying people with blood glucose problems that may first appear only after a glucose challenge. For a person with IGT, what is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes? As few as 1 to as many as 10 of every 100 persons with IGT will develop diabetes per year. The risk of getting diabetes rises as people become more overweight and more sedentary, have a stronge Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose form an intermediate stage in the natural history of diabetes mellitus. From 10 to 15 percent of adults in the United States have one of these conditions. Impaired glucose tolerance is defined as two-hour glucose levels of 140 to 199 mg per dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol) on the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, and impaired fasting glucose is defined as glucose levels of 100 to 125 mg per dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol per L) in fasting patients. These glucose levels are above normal but below the level that is diagnostic for diabetes. Patients with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose have a significant risk of developing diabetes and thus are an important target group for primary prevention. Risk factors for diabetes include family history of diabetes, body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2, sedentary lifestyle, hypertension, dyslipidemia, history of gestational diabetes or large-for-gestational-age infant, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Blacks, Latin Americans, Native Americans, and Asian-Pacific Islanders also are at increased risk for diabetes. Patients at higher risk should be screened with a fasting plasma glucose level. When the diagnosis of impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose is made, physicians should counsel patients to lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight and engage in moderate physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week. Drug therapy with metformin or acarbose has been shown to delay or prevent the onset of diabetes. However, medications are not as effective as lifestyle changes, and it is not known if treatment with these drugs is cost effective in the management of impaired glucose tolerance. Definitions and Epidemiology An expert committee sponsored by the American Di Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet For Impaired Fasting Glucose

Low Carb Diet For Impaired Fasting Glucose

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community low carb diet for impaired fasting glucose Found this wonderful forum after being diagnosed with IFG. My reading was only 6.1 but the reason I asked for the test was a family history of heart disease and diabetes type 1 and 2!!Thanks mum and dad I have been recently suffering from blurred, well I would more accurately describe it as double vision quite a lot so thought I would check it out. I am not overweight BMI 22, and walk the dog for 4 miles daily and eat what I thought was a healthy diet, so was shocked to get this diagnosis. Also a little upset as I know the damage through my family that diabetes can do, plus I was 50 this year, so felt old and that everything going wrong, but in retrospect perhaps this is a good thing to improve my general health and at least it has been picked up sooner rather than later. Looking on the bright side can still drink wine. Doc is going to retest in three months. Haven't got the blood figures with me, but they were all good, my trigs were the best 0.7 Meanwhile after reading this forum I have gone on to low carb eating, have upped my exercise :shock: and am trying to lose an extra half stone, (hope it comes from my tummy!). I have ordered myself a Blood meter, feel a bit of a hypochondriac, but I do like to take control of my health. I have also ordered Bernstein's book. Am I doing the right thing, am I overeacting to this diagnosis any advice welcome. You sound a very positive person,Jo.Lowering carbs does give you more energy after the initial 'withdrawal' symptoms! I find that I am no longer hungry,I do nor crave sweet things and my health has certainly improved since losing 2 and half stone.The diet or rather Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glycaemia

Impaired Fasting Glycaemia

This factsheet is for people whose blood test has shown a marginally high fasting glucose (blood sugar) level or who would like information about impaired fasting glycaemia. Impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) means that your body isn't able to regulate glucose as efficiently as it should. About impaired fasting glycaemia Complications Causes Diagnosis Treatment Further information Sources Related topics About impaired fasting glycaemia Glucose enters the blood from your intestines, where it's absorbed from food and drinks as a natural part of digestion. When glucose reaches your body tissues, such as muscle, it's made available to cells where it is needed for energy by the hormone insulin. Insulin regulates the level of glucose in the blood so that it doesn't go too high or too low. What is the normal range for blood glucose? Blood glucose concentrations change throughout the day. They are typically higher after eating and lower during fasting. A fasting blood glucose level lower than 6mmol/l is normal. A fasting blood glucose of 7mmol/l or higher may indicate diabetes. Diabetes is a long-term condition where the body is not able to control the amount of glucose in the blood. If your fasting blood glucose level is below 7mmol/l but above 6mmol/l you may have IFG or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG and IGT are not diabetes but suggest that your body is not converting glucose to energy as efficiently as it should. For the range of blood glucose concentrations associated with IFG, see Diagnosis. Complications Some people with IFG will go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Others may develop diabetes only if they don't take steps to reduce the chances of this happening (see Self-help). Diabetes is 10 to 20 times more likely in those with IGT or IFG. Since IFG can be an early Continue reading >>

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

You Are Here: AHRQ Archive Home > Archived EPC Evidence Reports > Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose (continued) Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose This information is for reference purposes only. It was current when produced and may now be outdated. Archive material is no longer maintained, and some links may not work. Persons with disabilities having difficulty accessing this information should contact us at: . Let us know the nature of the problem, the Web address of what you want, and your contact information. Please go to www.ahrq.gov for current information. An accurate diagnosis of DM is required because theconsequences for the individual are considerable and lifelong.The diagnosis of IFG or IGT is used as a risk indicator forfuture DM and/or CVD. The problem with these arbitraryclassifications is that test reproducibility is poor, and thisencourages repeat testing that adds to the uncertainty andconfusion of the diagnosis when results are different. The observedreproducibility for both IGT and IFG classification in thesestudies was roughly 50 percent. The kappa coefficients for theIGT category were quite low and indicate overall fairagreement. The potential factors contributing to the variationand poor reproducibility were not assessed for this review. The probability that a significant change has occurred inserial measurements can be estimated by calculating thereference change value (RCV). For FPG, the RCV = 2 * 1.96* (1.42 + 6.32) or 17.9 percent. For 2-hr PG, the RCV = 2* 1.96 * (1.42 + 16.62) or 46.4 percent. The differencebetween two fasting glucose values would therefore need to begreater than 17.9 percent to be significantly different. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

More in diabetes