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Impact Of Fish Oil On Diabetes

Fish Oil And Diabetes

Fish Oil And Diabetes

EDMONTON, CANADA. Diabetics are at significantly increased risk for cardiovascular disease and any dietary intervention that could decrease this risk would be of great importance. Studies have shown that taking fish oil supplements lowers triglycerides, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels, and blood pressure in non-diabetic individuals and thereby diminishes their risk of heart disease. Unfortunately, some early experiments with type II diabetics taking fish oil supplements reported adverse effects on glycemic control and cholesterol levels. So is there any relationship between fish oil and diabetes, and is it positive or negative? EPA and DHA vs Placebo Capsules NAPLES, ITALY. Animal studies have shown that fish oil supplementation has a beneficial effect on insulin resistance and can prevent its development in animals fed a high-fat diet. It is also known that a high fish intake can delay the development of diabetes in glucose-intolerant individuals. Researchers at the Federico II University recently set out to investigate if long-term supplementation with fish oils would improve insulin sensitivity in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). The clinical trial involved 16 NIDDM patients (average age of 56 years) who, after a 3 week run-in period during which they received 3 olive oil capsules per day, were assigned to receive either fish oil capsules or olive oil capsules for a further 6-month period. For the first two months the participants received either 3 fish oil capsules daily (320 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 530 mg docosahexaenoic acid [EPA and DHA, respectfully] per capsule) or 3 placebo capsules (each containing 1 gram of olive oil). During the last four months these dosages were reduced to 2 fish oil or 2 placebo capsules daily. The pa Continue reading >>

5 Excellent Benefits Of Fish Oil For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Excellent Benefits Of Fish Oil For Type 2 Diabetes

Derived from the fatty tissues of certain oily fish, fish oil contains the essential omega-3 fatty acids – eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA). These fatty acids are well known to be essential to human health, and they have some particularly great benefits for those with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. Research surrounding fish oil is extremely promising – from protective effects against coronary heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer, to aiding in diabetes management. Among the many benefits of omega-3s, the one that stands out the most is their ability to help fight inflammation in the body. Being that diabetes is partly an inflammatory condition, you will soon find out how it helps improve various outcomes for you. DISCLAIMER Please note that this information is not an endorsement for fish oil. We are simply sharing the research surrounding it. You should always discuss supplementation with your doctor. How fish oil works As already mentioned, fish oil provides a mighty dose of omega-3 fatty acids. And one of the main functions of omega-3 fatty acids is their ability to reduce inflammation. Inflammation is a complex process that occurs on a cellular level in your body. As a result of different stimulus, inflammatory cells are triggered in a long series of chemical reactions. These reactions involve critical immune cells that either increase or decrease the inflammation that is occuring in our bodies. In fact, inflammation is controlled in our bodies through a balance in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules. And this is where omega-3 fish oil lends a helping hand. Omega-3 fatty acids work by up-regulating (increasing) the expression (release) of the anti-inflammatory molecules. As a result this reduces inflammation in your body, Continue reading >>

My Go-to Supplement To Balance Blood Sugar

My Go-to Supplement To Balance Blood Sugar

Let’s be clear: even if you don’t have diabetes, you probably have some degree of insulin resistance, and its consequences wreak havoc on your waistline and overall health. “As much as 25% of the population by conservative estimates have a condition known as insulin resistance, which is at the root of both type 2 diabetes, as well as metabolic syndrome (a kind of pre-diabetes),” writes Dr. Jonny Bowden. “These folks simply don’t process carbs well. Their blood sugar goes up too high when they eat them, and the pancreas over-secretes insulin—the fat storage hormone—in response to the increased levels of blood sugar.” The resulting conditions take a huge hit on your waistline and overall health. “Insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome associated with it is often accompanied by increasing central obesity, fatigue after meals, sugar cravings, high triglycerides, low HDL, high blood pressure, problems with blood clotting, as well as increased inflammation,” writes Dr. Mark Hyman. “If you have a family history of obesity (especially around the belly), diabetes, early heart disease, or even dementia, you are even more prone to this problem.” Even if you don’t have diabetes, you probably have some degree of insulin resistance, and its consequences wreak havoc on your waistline and overall health. Doing my Sugar Impact Diet and gradually transitioning into a low-sugar impact diet is the very best thing you can do for insulin resistance. Sugar plays a monumental role in the inflammation, obesity, and insulin resistance that contribute to type 2 diabetes. What does all this have to do with fish oil?Well, everyone benefits from taking this supplement, but if you have a familial history of diabetes or any form of insulin resistance, you can’t aff Continue reading >>

Omega-3 And Blood Sugar

Omega-3 And Blood Sugar

When people think of blood sugar levels, the first thing that typically pops into their head is diabetes and the thought of pricking their finger to get a number on a small machine. With the rise of diabetes cases in the recent years, the term is one that is heard often and has become a source of fear. The link between high blood sugar levels and diabetes is well established. There is an agreement among health professionals that having sustained high blood sugar can lead to the development of diabetes or worsen pre-existing cases. Due to this, it is no surprise that many people are looking for ways to keep their blood sugar levels in check. Among the natural ways to control blood sugar levels, omega-3 fatty acids have shown great promise in this arena. Blood sugar levels measure how much glucose is in the bloodstream. When you eat, the food is broken down and glucose, or sugar, is produced. It gets sent from the digestive system into the bloodstream and is then absorbed by cells to either be used or stored for when needed. Glucose is the body’s main energy source and therefore, it is important to have a decent amount but when there is too much glucose present, it can become dangerous. The blood sugar levels that are considered high vary depending on the time of day. During the period between meals, known as the fasting period, high blood sugar levels are considered any amount greater 100 mg/dL. For the two hours after a meal, blood sugar levels will be elevated but are still are not considered high unless they are greater than 120 mg/dL. Once the levels go over these values, the body goes into a state known as hyperglycemia. While the occasional case of hyperglycemia is not harmful and is nothing to worry about, sustained or frequent hyperglycemia is a cause for alarm Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

Is Fish Oil Safe For Diabetes?

Is Fish Oil Safe For Diabetes?

If you’re diabetic, you may be wondering if fish oil is safe for diabetes or if there are any side effects from using fish oil? Recent research shows that fish oil may actually reduce your risk for diabetes, enhance how your body metabolizes glucose and even lower your risk for high blood pressure. While fish oils provide an excellent source of the healthy fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and ecoisapaentenoic acid (EPA), you may be concerned about fish oil affecting your blood sugar levels. Fish oil has been shown to have many health benefits. It’s been proven to help reduce inflammation, lessen joint pain and even have a positive effect on your mood. If you’re diabetic, you may want to enjoy these health benefits, but could have concerns if fish oil is safe for diabetes and blood sugar maintenance. Recent studies have shown that fish oil is safe for diabetics because they don’t have any impact on insulin sensitivity or glucose metabolism. The following studies show how fish oil can actually have many health benefits for diabetics: 1. Fish Oils may Reduce Your Risk for Diabetes Boston, Massachusetts – Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health discovered that fish oil can help increase blood levels of a hormone called adiponectin; this is an important chemical that helps regulate how your body metabolizes glucose. Scientists looked at a number of studies where 682 people took fish oil and another 641 patients were given placebos. They discovered that the people taking fish oil experienced higher adipopectin levels, quoting: “Although higher levels of adiponectin in the bloodstream have been linked to lower risk of diabetes and coronary heart disease, whether fish oil influences glucose metabolism and development of type 2 diabetes remains uncl Continue reading >>

Fish Oil Pills Might Cut Diabetes Risk

Fish Oil Pills Might Cut Diabetes Risk

HealthDay Reporter supplements could help reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. The supplements, also known as omega-3 fatty acids, increase levels of a hormone called adiponectin that's linked to insulin sensitivity, Harvard researchers found. Higher levels of this hormone in the bloodstream have also been linked to a lower risk for heart disease. "While prior animal studies found fish oil increased circulating adiponectin, whether similar effects apply in humans is not established," the study's lead author, Jason Wu, from the Harvard School of Public Health, said in a news release from the Endocrine Society. For their study, the researchers conducted a "meta-analysis" of 14 clinical trials. A meta-analysis reviews existing research and attempts to find a consistent pattern. In this case, the studies that were reviewed were all randomized, placebo-controlled trials, which is considered the gold standard in research. "By reviewing evidence from existing randomized clinical trials, we found that fish oil supplementation caused modest increases in adiponectin in the blood of humans," Wu explained. Overall, the new study looked at 682 people who took fish oil supplements, and 641 who were given placebos such as sunflower or olive oil. Among the people treated with fish oil, adiponectin levels increased by 0.37 micrograms per milliliter of blood. This hormone plays a beneficial role in processes that affect metabolism, such as blood sugar regulation and inflammation. Because the effects of fish oil varied significantly in the studies analyzed, the researchers suggested that omega-3 fatty acids could have a stronger effect in certain groups of people. The investigators concluded that more research is needed to determine which people would benefit most f Continue reading >>

Fabulous Fish Oil Findings: Part 3

Fabulous Fish Oil Findings: Part 3

Weve covered a lot of information about omega-3 fatty acids over the past two weeks . Today well wrap up the three-part series by looking at fish-oil supplements, as well as the potential side effects and safety issues that surround them. Why would someone want to take fish-oil supplements? Well, if youre like me, I happen to dislike seafood, with the exception of a tuna sandwich and the occasional piece of swordfish. Or maybe you love fish but live in an area where its hard to get fresh, high-quality seafood. Or it may be that you take fish-oil supplements for health insurance purposes. Remember, too, that if you have heart disease or have high triglycerides , the amount of omega-3s that you need can be difficult to get from eating fish alone. Whatever the reason, more and more people are turning to supplements (of all kinds). How do you go about choosing a fish-oil supplement? First off, stay clear of taking cod-liver oil. This oil, which some of you may remember having to choke down during your childhoods, is a highly concentrated source of both vitamins A and D. Too much of either of these fat-soluble vitamins can be dangerous. Also, cod-liver oil is obviously made from the cods liver. The liver is the bodys filter and can harbor toxins, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic pollutants that are frequently found in the fatty tissue of animals and fish. Second, make sure you choose a supplement that contains both EPA and DHA, the two types of omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil. Menhaden, sardines, anchovies, halibut, salmon, and mackerel are commonly used to make supplements. Most fish-oil supplements come in gelatin capsule form and are usually odorless, tasteless, and easy to swallow. (However, avoid taking any supplement that smells rancid or fishy. Continue reading >>

Far From Fin-ished: Fish Oil May Help Fight Type 2 Diabetes, But Link Unclear

Far From Fin-ished: Fish Oil May Help Fight Type 2 Diabetes, But Link Unclear

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2013 — There’s something fishy about the news that omega-3 supplements may help fight type 2 diabetes. Researchers believe fish oil can help with glucose regulation, but they don't yet understand whether it has a direct impact on type 2 diabetes development, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health reviewed data from 14 studies involving 1,323 subjects to determine the effects of fish oil supplements on diabetes risk factors. In total, 682 subjects had taken fish oil supplements. The researchers found that fish oil was associated with an increase in the level of the hormone adiponectin – which effects glucose regulation and inflammation. Their findings confirmed previous animal studies that also found fish oil can raise the level of adiponectin in the bloodstream. Scott Drab, PharmD., CDE, BC-ADM, associate professor of pharmacy and therapeutics at the University of Pittsburgh, says people with diabetes can benefit from taking fish oil supplements. “Fish oil has anti-inflammatory properties, and because insulin resistance is associated with inflammation, we recommend fish oil to our patients,” said Dr. Drab. “Anything used as an anti-inflammatory can help glucose levels.” Miracle Cure for Diabetes It may help glucose levels, but the authors of the Harvard study were not convinced that the increase in adiponectin levels associated with fish oil could directly prevent type 2 diabetes. "Although higher levels of adiponectin in the bloodstream have been linked to lower risk of diabetes, whether fish oil influences glucose metabolism and development of type 2 diabetes remains unclear," said the study's lead author, Jason Wu, PhD, in a press release Continue reading >>

Effects Of Fish Oil Supplementation On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Niddm.

Effects Of Fish Oil Supplementation On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Niddm.

Abstract Fish oils, containing omega-3 fatty acids (omega 3FAs), favorably influence plasma lipoproteins in nondiabetic humans and prevent the development of insulin resistance induced by fat feeding in rats. We studied the effects of fish oils in 10 subjects (aged 42-65 yr) with mild non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Subjects were fed a standard diabetic diet plus 1) no supplementation (baseline), 2) 10 g fish oil concentrate (30% omega 3FAs) daily, and 3) 10 g safflower oil daily over separate 3-wk periods, the latter two supplements being given in radom order by use of a double-blind crossover design. At the end of each diet period, fasting blood glucose (FBG), insulin, and lipids were measured, and insulin sensitivity was assessed with a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp performed with [3-3H]glucose. FBG increased 14% during fish oil and 11% during safflower oil supplementation compared with baseline (P less than .05), whereas body weight, fasting serum insulin levels, and insulin sensitivity were unchanged. The absolute increase in FBG during each supplementation period correlated with the baseline FBG (fish oil, r = .83, P less than .005); safflower oil, r = .75, P = .012). Fasting plasma triglyceride levels decreased during fish oil supplementation in the 4 subjects with baseline hypertriglyceridemia (greater than 2 mM) but were not significantly reduced overall. There was no significant change in fasting plasma total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In summary, dietary fish oil supplementation adversely affected glycemic control in NIDDM subjects without producing significant beneficial effects on plasma lipids. The effect of safflower oil supplementation was not significantly different from fish oil, sugg Continue reading >>

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Question: Answer: Many different supplements may help lower or control blood sugar in people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who experience hyperglycemia (when blood glucose rises higher than normal). These supplements are discussed below. More details about each, including dosage, drug interactions, potential side effects, and ConsumerLab.com's reviews of products on the market, can be found by clicking on the links. Due to the seriousness of hyperglycemia, it is important to consult with your physician regarding use of these supplements. Cinnamon supplements may modestly improve blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not well controlled with medication. In addition, one small study found that a branded cinnamon extract reduced fasting blood sugar by an average of about 10 mg/dL in prediabetic men and women with metabolic syndrome. Keep in mind, however, that only certain varieties of cinnamon have been shown to have this effect, and long-term safety studies have not been conducted. Curcumin (from turmeric) may improve blood sugar levels, according to preliminary studies, and one study found curcumin to dramatically lower the chances of prediabetes in middle-aged, slightly overweight men and women with somewhat higher than normal blood sugar levels. Alpha lipoic acid may improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, although it may only slightly reduce levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Chromium picolinate may help some people with type 2 diabetes decrease fasting blood glucose levels as well as levels of insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). However, be aware that high doses may worsen insulin sensitivity in healthy people who are not obese or diabetic. Having adequate blood levels of vi Continue reading >>

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

A type of polyunsaturated fat believed to have multiple health benefits. Omega-3 fatty acids get their name from the structure of their molecules, in which the first of several double bonds occurs three carbon atoms away from the end of the carbon chain. There are three types of omega-3 fatty acids: Alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) is found in vegetable sources, and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) come from fish and other marine life. Research has suggested that consuming omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and fish oils could protect a person from coronary heart disease. For example, some studies have shown that Greenland Eskimos, who consume a lot of seal and whale meat, have much lower blood cholesterol levels, lower triglyceride levels, and lower rates of coronary artery disease than people living in Denmark (who consume less fish). Other studies have shown that men who ate fish at least once a week had a lower mortality rate from coronary artery disease than men who ate none. Other potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acids have also emerged from scientific studies, including the following: • Diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids may decrease insulin resistance in people with diabetes. • Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of heart attacks, stroke, macular degeneration, and certain types of cancer. • Those who consume more fish appear to have lower rates of depression, and omega-3 supplements, when used in conjunction with conventional medical therapy, may be helpful in treating bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression) and schizophrenia. • Omega-3 supplements have been shown to improve symptoms of inflammatory diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Health experts agree t Continue reading >>

Fish Oil May Help With Diabetic Neuropathy

Fish Oil May Help With Diabetic Neuropathy

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Fish oil may help with diabetic neuropathy Approximately 50 percent of patients with diabetes suffer from nerve damage, or neuropathy. No cure exists, and the most effective treatment, keeping blood sugar in control, only slows neuropathy. A new study, however, introduces a new alternative, omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil. The study shows that fish oil supplements can restore the condition of nerves damaged from diabetes in mice. Approximately 50 percent of patients with diabetes suffer from nerve damage, or neuropathy. No cure exists, and the most effective treatment, keeping blood sugar in control, only slows neuropathy. A new study in the Journal of Neurophysiology, however, introduces a new alternative, omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil. The study shows that fish oil supplements can restore the condition of nerves damaged from diabetes in mice. "Diabetic neuropathy is a very costly and debilitating complication of diabetes. It is the leading cause of foot ulcers and nontrauma-related amputations, and the impact of diabetic neuropathy on the patient and family are unmeasurable," said Mark Yorek of the VA Medical Center in Iowa City, the study's lead investigator. Fish oil is an attractive treatment approach because "supplements are considered very safe and could be easily translated into everyday care. Fish oil would be easy to take, like a vitamin, and should have few side effects when combined with other medications," explained Yorek. Previous studies of obesity and diabetes have reported better blood sugar handling, liver function and reduced inflammation with omega-3 fatty acids treatment. The health benefits were attributed to protective molecules produced from omega-3 fatty Continue reading >>

Effects Of Fish Oil Supplementation On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Niddm

Effects Of Fish Oil Supplementation On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Niddm

Fish oils, containing omega-3 fatty acids (ω3FAs), favorably influence plasma lipoproteins in nondiabetic humans and prevent the development of insulin resistance induced by fat feeding in rats. We studied the effects of fish oils in 10 subjects (aged 42–65 yr) with mild non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Subjects were fed a standard diabetic diet plus 1) no supplementation (baseline), 2) 10 g fish oil concentrate (30% ω3FAs) daily, and 3) 10 g safflower oil daily over separate 3-wk periods, the latter two supplements being given in radom order by use of a double-blind crossover design. At the end of each diet period, fasting blood glucose (FBG), insulin, and lipids were measured, and insulin sensitivity was assessed with a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp performed with [3-3H]glucose. FBG increased 14% during fish oil and 11% during safflower oil supplementation compared with baseline (P < .05), whereas body weight, fasting serum insulin levels, and insulin sensitivity were unchanged. The absolute increase in FBG during each supplementation period correlated with the baseline FBG (fish oil, r = .83, P < .005; safflower oil, r = .75, P = .012). Fasting plasma triglyceride levels decreased during fish oil supplementation in the 4 subjects with baseline hypertriglyceridemia (>2 mM) but were not significantly reduced overall. There was no significant change in fasting plasma total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In summary, dietary fish oil supplementation adversely affected glycemic control in NIDDM subjects without producing significant beneficial effects on plasma lipids. The effect of safflower oil supplementation was not significantly different from fish oil, suggesting that the negative effects on glucose Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Fish Oil In Diabetes

Side Effects Of Fish Oil In Diabetes

Fish oil, a supplement rich in omega-3 fatty acids frequently touted for its protective effects on the heart, isn't right for everyone. In fact, fish oil may cause negative side effects particularly when used by people with diabetes -- a condition characterized by unusually high blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, be sure to talk with your primary care provider before beginning treatment with fish oil supplements. Video of the Day Elevated Blood Sugar The omega-3 fatty acids present in fish oil may raise your blood sugar level. An increase in blood sugar levels can be particularly harmful for people who already have diabetes. If your diabetes is controlled by medication, you may begin to experience diabetes symptoms again while taking fish oil supplements. Such symptoms include increased urination and thirst, sudden weight loss, fatigue and blurred vision. Seek prompt care from your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms, especially if you have already been diagnosed with diabetes. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels may cause severe and permanent kidney and nerve damage. Diabetes Drug Interaction Always discuss all medications you are currently taking with your primary medical provider before beginning treatment with dietary or herbal supplements, including fish oil. The blood sugar raising effects of fish oil may reduce the efficacy of any diabetes medications you are currently taking, including glipizide, metformin, glyburide or insulin, the University of Maryland Medical Center warns. Consequently, your doctor may need to increase the amount of diabetes medication you take each day to counteract the blood sugar effects of fish oil. People with diabetes may also experience side effects that are common among most people during treatment with fish oil supplement Continue reading >>

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