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Images Of Diabetes

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

9 Bad Diabetes Photos

9 Bad Diabetes Photos

Let’s face it – there’s a lot of bad diabetes information on the internet. Diabetes stock photography seems to be an especially cringe-worthy corner. Enjoy these 9 images that made us say “WTF.” We don’t know who thought these were a good idea. Next time, ask a person with diabetes! 1. Not sure what this person is injecting but, ahem, it doesn’t seem like insulin. 2. Maybe I’ll just stick this strip into the charge port of my iPhone and see what happens? 3. 118! Better eat this…unpeeled orange? 4. That just looks painful. 5. This person is about to experience a strip error. 7. When your glucometer and a donut make you jump for joy! 9. Ah, yes. Always good to test your blood sugar while surrounded by healthy fruits and vegetables. Missing the crucial test strip, too. Read 7 Times TV and Movies Got Diabetes Wrong by Thor Jensen. Continue reading >>

10 Symptoms That Could Indicate Type 2 Diabetes (photos)

10 Symptoms That Could Indicate Type 2 Diabetes (photos)

Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90 percent of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. “Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don’t know it,” says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, it could be wise to contact your doctor. Continue reading >>

Body Image And Diabetes

Body Image And Diabetes

As a woman with diabetes, I am constantly thinking about diet, exercise and medication, even if I dont want to. I have to think about every gram of carbohydrate consumed, unit of insulin injected and every minute of exercise performed. Even as The Diabetes Coach, I dislike thinking about food. I am tired of it. I am tired of meal planning and having to mentally think through every minute of my day and how whatever I am doing will affect my blood glucose levels (BG). All of this thinking about food makes it hard for me not to focus on health and body image. According to The Smart Womans Guide to Diabetes, the cycle of inexact insulin dosing can cause weight gain, which increases insulin requirements and resistance. And theres another factor at work: The insulin-producing cells that were attacked by the disease also make Amylin, which works with other appetite regulating hormones such as leptin, regulate the sensation of fullness. The resulting difficulty of diabetics to determine whether they are full has been documented in anorexia. Researchers estimate that 10-20 percent of girls in their mid-teen years and 30-40 percent of late-teenage girls, and young adult women with diabetes, skip or alter insulin doses to control their weight. Many diabetics do not realize this relationship. Most women focus on their body image. Many diabetics cant stop focusing on it. This can lead to eating disorders and poor self-esteem. I know of diabetic women trying to regulate their weight by altering their insulin doses. In an effort to return to their diagnosis weight, insulin was forgotten and BG would rise, causing the body to burn fat instead of sugar. Weight would drop, but health would suffer. This practice has been labeled diabulimia. According to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fou Continue reading >>

Diagnostic Method Of Diabetes Based On Support Vector Machine And Tongue Images

Diagnostic Method Of Diabetes Based On Support Vector Machine And Tongue Images

BioMed Research International Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7961494, 9 pages 1Basic Medical College, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China 2Shanghai Innovation Center of TCM Health Service, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China 3Department of Endocrinology, Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China Received 26 August 2016; Revised 24 November 2016; Accepted 12 December 2016; Published 4 January 2017 Academic Editor: Zexuan Ji Copyright © 2017 Jianfeng Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Objective. The purpose of this research is to develop a diagnostic method of diabetes based on standardized tongue image using support vector machine (SVM). Methods. Tongue images of 296 diabetic subjects and 531 nondiabetic subjects were collected by the TDA-1 digital tongue instrument. Tongue body and tongue coating were separated by the division-merging method and chrominance-threshold method. With extracted color and texture features of the tongue image as input variables, the diagnostic model of diabetes with SVM was trained. After optimizing the combination of SVM kernel parameters and input variables, the influences of the combinations on the model were analyzed. Results. After normalizing parameters of tongue images, the accuracy rate of diabetes predication was increased from 77.83% to 78.77%. The accuracy rate and area under curve (AUC) were not reduced after reducing the dimensions of tongue features with principal component analysis (PCA), whi Continue reading >>

Pictures Of Diabetes: The Broken Pancreas Project

Pictures Of Diabetes: The Broken Pancreas Project

Pictures of Diabetes: The Broken Pancreas Project Pictures of Diabetes: The Broken Pancreas Project Ken Kotch was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes two days before Thanksgiving in 1988. He was in third grade, and was the only person in his school who had diabetes. Ken says, When I was diagnosed most peoples reaction was, so now you cant do _______. Fill in the blank with anything and everything. Twenty-two years later, hes still surprised when someone asks him if its okay for him to put salt on his fries, or if he should be eating certain things at all. At the time of his diagnosis, while still in the hospital, Kens new endocrinologist, Dr. Starkman, said Ken, you can do anything you want in your life except skydive or scuba dive. Ken couldnt figure out why diabetes would stop him from doing those things, but nothing else. Then the doctor continued, Those are the two things I wouldnt do, so I dont recommend them to anyone else. Since then Ken has been both skydiving and scuba diving. Hes also become a professional photographer. Ken holds a B.S. in Photography from Northeastern University and has worked for the American Diabetes Association, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, ProCycling Magazine, and many other places. He has lived in Italy, China and currently calls Boston home. In the summer of 2010, Ken traveled across the U.S. photographing people with diabetes for a project called Broken Pancreas . We had the opportunity to talk to Ken about his project, and learn more about his work. What motivated you to start the Broken Pancreas project? I was sitting in a coffee shop eating a chocolate chip cookie. An acquaintance came over to me and all but yelled at me, saying, You cant eat that! You have diabetes! Ive heard this before but that day was the last straw. (I ha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Five Distinct Types, Not Two: Study

Diabetes Has Five Distinct Types, Not Two: Study

Diabetes Has Five Distinct Types, Not Two: Study Tech & Science diabetes Obesity type 2 diabetes Most diabetes cases are split into twogroups: type one and type two. A new study including nearly 15,000 diabetic patients suggests this decades-old distinction only tells part of the story. A new report dividesdiabetes mellitus into fiveseparate conditions. Theadvancement that could improve patient care. Because each group hasdifferent causes and complication risks, the authors of the study, published Thursday in the Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology , believe the results are a first step towards precision medicine in diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by high blood sugar. Over time, it can lead to heart attack, limb amputation and blindness. Almost 10 percentof the U.S. population30.3 million peoplehas a form of diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Type 2 diabetes accounts for between 90 and 95 percent of these cases, and roughly 5 percent aretype 1. Less common forms of the disorder include gestational diabetes and neonatal diabetes. Some diabetic patients use insulin to control their disorder. In this picture, a medical assistant administers a insulin to a patient in New Dehli, November 8, 2011. Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images In type 1 diabetes, the bodys own immune systemattacks beta cells, which produce insulin. This malfunction leaves the body without enough insulinto regulate blood sugar levels effectively. Type 2 diabetes occurs when either the body does not produce enough of the hormone, or its insulin fails to work properly. Usually linked to obesity and a lack of exercise, type 2 diabetes may also have underlying genetic factors. See all of the best photos of the week in these slideshows Researche Continue reading >>

Self-image | Diabetes Uk

Self-image | Diabetes Uk

Being a teenager means going through some physical changes. But remember, most of your friends will be in the same position. People tend to grow up gradually, and the different phases of puberty happen at different ages for different people. Poor diabetes control can delay puberty, so keeping good control of your diabetes will help you grow and develop at the right time. Self-image and self-esteem are all about how you feel about yourself. How much do you feel you are worth? How much do you feel other people value you? Self-esteem is important because feeling good about yourself can affect your mental health, how you behave, and your diabetes. Self-image is how you view your physical self including whether you feel you are attractive and whether others like how you look. For many people, body image can be closely linked to your self-esteem. What influences your self-esteem and self-image? There are lots of factors that can affect the way you feel about yourself, and living with diabetes can sometimes make things feel worse. Puberty is a time when your body goes through lots of changes which often make some people struggle with their self-esteem and body image. These changes, along with wanting to feel accepted and liked by our friends, means we often compare ourselves to others. It's important to remember everyone is different. Not everyone grows or develops at the same time or in the same way. Sometimes our family life may affect the way we feel about ourselves. Maybe your parents or teachers are too focused on you looking a certain way, and we are all often sensitive to other people's comments. You may experience negative comments from friends or classmates, remember those people are often struggling with their own body image and self-esteem. We all consume media eve Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Chronically high blood sugar (glucose) levels can be associated with serious complications in people who have diabetes. The feet are especially at risk. Two conditions called diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can damage the feet (and other areas of the body) in people who have diabetes. What is diabetic neuropathy? Chronically high sugar levels associated with uncontrolled diabetes can cause nerve damage that interferes with the ability to sense pain and temperature. This so-called "sensory diabetic neuropathy" increases the risk a person with diabetes will not notice problems with his or her feet. Nearly 10% of people with diabetes develop foot ulcers due to peripheral vascular disease and nerve damage. People with diabetes may not notice sores or cuts on the feet, which in turn can lead to an infection. Nerve damage can also affect the function of foot muscles, leading to improper alignment and injury. What is peripheral vascular disease? Diabetes is associated with poor circulation (blood flow). Inadequate blood flow increases the healing time for cuts and sores. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs. Poor blood flow increases the risk that infections will not heal. This, in turn, increases the risk of ulcers and gangrene, which is tissue death that occurs in a localized area when there is an inadequate blood supply. What are common foot problems of people with diabetes? The following images show common foot problems that anyone can get; however, those with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications associated with these conditions, including infection and even amputation. Athlete's foot Fungal infection of the feet is called athlete's foot. Cracked skin, itching, and redness are associated w Continue reading >>

9 Foods You Should Be Eating For Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods You Should Be Eating For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Healthy Food Choices for Type 2 Diabetes Paying attention to what you eat is essential for controlling your weight and blood glucose levels when you have type 2 diabetes. While this means knowing which foods to limit or avoid, it’s just as important to know which foods are the most beneficial to you — and how to include them in your meal planning. “When it comes to eating a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, balance is really the key,” says Kelly Kennedy, RD, resident nutritionist for Everyday Health. “Many people think that they have to avoid carbohydrates if they have diabetes, but this is not the case. Instead, it's important to focus on eating approximately the same amount of carbohydrates from healthy sources, such as dairy foods, legumes, fruit, and whole grains, at each meal.” Also make whole foods — such as fruit, vegetables, lean proteins, fat-free or non-fat dairy, whole grains, and healthy fats — your go-tos. “Those provide the most nutritional ‘bang for your buck,'" Kennedy adds. Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Handwriting Image

Diabetes - Handwriting Image

The picture below related to the word Diabetes is licensed by R M Media Ltd under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license which permits the free use of the image for any purpose including commercial use and also permits the image to be modified. The image may be redistributed for free under the same Creative Commons license but may not be sold, attribution required, see license details below. Please ensure the license and image size are suitable for your use, alternatively you can purchase the original full size image on a rights managed license for a few dollars from Alpha Stock Images here License permits: Sharing, copying and redistributing in any medium or format including adapting, remixing, transforming, and building upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. The image may be redistributed for free under the same Creative Commons license but may not be sold, attribution required.. License: Creative Commons 3 - CC BY-SA 3.0 Attribution: Alpha Stock Images - Original Author: Nick Youngson - Original Image: Should the above licence or the size of the image not be suitable for your use then you can purchase the original full size image on a rights managed basis here from a few dollars. R M Media Ltd offers a small percentage of it's stock for free use under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license which allows publishers access to high quality images at no cost in return for a link to one of R M Media's web sites. Please do not abuse this service. Alpha Stock Images has a large range of stock images from just a few dollars with no attribution required: Continue reading >>

How To Spot Diabetic Foot Complications Early

How To Spot Diabetic Foot Complications Early

How to spot diabetic foot complications early People with diabetes have a higher risk of foot amputation than anyone else. Heres what to look for to avoid the risk of serious complications. Warning: Some images in this article might upset sensitive readers. Diabetics should examine their feet regularly. ~ Foot infections are among the most common health complications in people with diabetes. When a seemingly normal wound is left untreated, it can become severely infected. We look at the reasons why diabetics should take special care of their feet. Why diabetics are prone to foot conditions Diabetics have abnormally high levels of glucose in their blood for long periods of time. This can lead to artery and nerve damage, which can compromise sensation in the feet. When diabetics get a simple cut, scrape or foot ailment and they leave it untreated, it can lead to serious complications. The two major conditions that can ultimately cause foot problems in diabetes are: Neuropathy occurs because of nerve damage, causing diminished sensation in the feet. This can lead to injuries such as wounds or scrapes getting infected. Peripheral vascular disease a condition that affects blood flow, making it more difficult for a cut or wound to heal. "It's not that these two conditions will cause ulcers as such, but they can result in extremely poor healing of any skin injuries. Often diabetics will have an injury, such as a blister or a cut, and because they have no feeling in that region, they do not realise that they have been hurt, and continue walking on an injured foot or leg," says podiatrist Chris Delpierre. As we now know, neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease associated with diabetes affect the feet. One of the biggest risks for diabetics is foot ulcers which can eventually Continue reading >>

Newsroom - Images & Video

Newsroom - Images & Video

Press Releases In the News DRI tv Publications images & Video D-Stats We are pleased to provide the following images to members of diabetes community and the mediacovering the DRI. Please click on a thumbnail below to download a lo-res image. For additional images or inquiries, please contact us . Engineering a Biological Scaffold onto the Omentum for a DRI BioHub Platform Camillo Ricordi, M.D., Director of the Diabetes Research Institute DRI Director Camillo Ricordi, M.D., holds the Ricordi Chamber Alice Tomei, Ph.D., Director of the DRI'sImmunoengineering Lab Clinical trial meeting amongDRI's multidisciplinary research team Inside the DRI's cGMP human cell processing facility Peter Buchwald, Ph.D., Director of Drug Discovery Armando Mendez, Ph.D., Director of the Biomarker and Immunoassay Lab Lisa Rafkin-Mervis and Della Matheson are part of the DRI's TrialNet team Islet Isolation and Transplantation Graphic (liver) Isolated human pancreatic islet cells in petri dish Rodolfo Alejandro, M.D., and David Baidal, M.D., clinical islet transplant Allison Bayer, Ph.D., and Chris Fraker, Ph.D. Alberto Pugliese, M.D., Deputy Director for Immune Tolerance Alberto Pugliese, M.D., and Thomas Malek, Ph.D. Diabetes Research Institute Clinical Cell Transplant Team Dora Berman-Weinberg, Ph.D., and Norma S. Kenyon Ph.D. Ronald B. Goldberg, M.D., with the Diabetes Prevention Program team Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Jay Skyler, M.D., Deputy Dir., Clinical Research and Academic Programs Peter Buchwald, Ph.D., with members of BiorepTechnologies Observing transplanted islets through the "Living Window" eye model Chemists enhance DRI's conformal coatings with nanotechnologies Juan Dominguez-Bendala, Ph.D., and Ricardo Pastori, Ph.D., Cell Supp Continue reading >>

Diabetes Related Images

Diabetes Related Images

All images may be downloaded and used, provided credit is given to WHO and photographers as mentioned in individual photos. WHO/Atul Loke jpg, 9.08Mb Global burden Over the past four decades, diabetes prevalence has risen faster in low- and middle-income countries. In this image, a nurse from Thane Civil Hospital in India checks the level of sugar in the blood of diabetic patients. WHO/Eduardo Martino jpg, 9.27Mb Complications of diabetes Diabetes complications include vision loss as well as stroke, heart attack, kidney failure and limb amputation. Roseane from Brazil has type 1 diabetes. In this image, she has her regular eye examination to prevent complications from her disease. WHO/Quinn Mattingly jpg, 16.75Mb Preventing diabetes To prevent type 2 diabetes, it is recommended that people eat healthily, be physically active and avoid excessive weight gain. WHO/Quinn Mattingly jpg, 3.29Mb Access to essential medicines for diabetes Insulin and oral hypoglycaemic agents are reported as generally available in only a minority of low- and middle-income countries. This image shows medicines in a cabinet at the National Hospital of Endocrinology in Hanoi, Viet Nam. WHO/Fredrik Naumann jpg, 3.38Mb National capacity for prevention and control of diabetes Most countries report having national policies on both diabetes and on related factors such as diet and physical activity. They also have national guidelines or protocols to improve the management of diabetes. In this image from Norway, Mikael, a teenager with type 1 diabetes, meets his doctor to discuss adjustments to his insulin intake. Together they talk about his blood sugar levels and other factors that influence type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

A Visual Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

A Visual Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

What Is It? When you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas can’t make insulin. This vital hormone helps your body's cells convert sugar into energy. Without it, sugar builds up in your blood and can reach dangerous levels. To avoid life-threatening complications, people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin for their entire lives. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to come on suddenly and may include: Feeling more thirsty than usual Dry mouth Fruity breath Peeing a lot As blood sugar levels remain high, type 1 diabetes often leads to: Weight loss Bigger appetite Lack of energy, drowsiness Many people with type 1 diabetes get uncomfortable skin conditions, including: Bacterial infections Fungal infections Itching, dry skin, poor circulation Girls with type 1 diabetes are more likely to have genital yeast infections. Babies can get candidiasis, a severe form of diaper rash caused by yeast. It can easily spread from the diaper area to the thighs and stomach. When blood sugar isn't controlled, type 1 diabetes can cause more serious symptoms, like: Numbness or tingling in the feet Blurred vision Low blood sugar (called hypoglycemia) Passing out If your blood sugar gets too high or too low, you could go into a diabetic coma. You may not have any warning signs before this happens. You will need to get emergency treatment. Without treatment, type 1 diabetes deprives your cells of the sugar they need for energy. Your body starts burning fat instead, which causes ketones to build up in the blood. These are acids that can poison your body. This plus other changes in your blood can trigger a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. This is an emergency that must be treated quickly. You may need to go to the ER. In type 1 diabetes, your immune system destroys cell Continue reading >>

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