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Im 28 Weeks Pregnant And Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes: My Story

Gestational Diabetes: My Story

Remember a few weeks ago, when I shared my struggles in taking the gestational diabetes test? Well, there ended up being a lot more behind that struggle than just having to figure out a way to swallow that awful sugary fruit punch drink! About a month ago, I took the “one hour” glucose test and did not pass it. My blood sugar count wasn’t awful- a 144, but my doctor recommends retaking the test if you’re over 140. So I trooped back to the lab and took the “three hour” glucose test. Essentially, the lab technician tested my blood clean, I then drank the sugary drink (this time I went for orange- it was still awful!) and they proceeded to test my blood every hour for the next three hours. It was actually a tough test- the sugary drink more or less shocked my body as my blood attempted to metabolize it. I didn’t feel too hot through the entire thing, but had high hopes that because my original count wasn’t that high, I would be fine. A few days later, I received a phone call from my doctor’s office- I had failed the three hour glucose test and had been diagnosed with gestational diabetes. So many thoughts quickly ran through my head- did I do something wrong to trigger this? Have I put my baby at risk? What the heck comes next? Luckily, my doctor’s office holds a gestational diabetes training class to help answer some of these and many other questions. And it’s been a couple of weeks for me so far, so I have learned a lot about this condition. While I’m certainly not a doctor or a diabetes expert (please consult a professional for expert advice!), I thought I’d share my story with all of you in case you’re at risk for gestational diabetes or if you’re going through being diagnosed as well. First off, I learned that nothing I had done triggered Continue reading >>

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

Between 32 - 36 weeks are what we know to be the toughest time for gestational diabetes. It's at around this point that we typically see insulin resistance worsen. You think you have your gestational diabetes diet sussed out and you can literally wake and eat the same breakfast you've been tolerating well for weeks on end and get crazy blood sugar levels?! What the heck is going on and what did you do wrong???... Firstly, you've done NOTHING wrong! This is to be expected and is completely normal and typical with gestational diabetes. To understand what's going on, we need to understand a bit about gestational diabetes and how it works... Gestational diabetes is a progressive condition Gestational diabetes typically presents itself between 24 - 28 weeks. It is for this reason that it is around this time where screening for gestational diabetes typically takes place. It should be noted that insulin resistance can be detected much earlier than this time also, especially in subsequent pregnancies where the mother previously had gestational diabetes. Many ladies are told that earlier diagnosis means that they may have undiagnosed Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. We have found that this is not the case when ladies are tested following the birth of their baby and so we advise not panicking and waiting until you have your post birth diabetes testing before causing yourself too much distress. Further information on post birth diabetes testing can be found here. Gestational diabetes is caused by increased hormones levels from the placenta that cause insulin resistance. Those diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not able to increase insulin production to meet the additional requirement, or they cannot use the insulin which has been made effectively and so blood sugar levels remain to Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

So you’ve had the Glucose Tolerance Test, or maybe you’ve been monitoring you’re blood sugar levels at home, and your blood sugar readings were high. You have been given a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. If your experience was anything like mine, an Obstetrician or midwife gave you a pamphlet on ‘Diabetes and Pregnancy’, referred you to a dietician and endocrinologist for management, and then sent on your way. And now you’re at home, and all the questions you didn’t think to ask are flooding in… What the heck is it? And what does it mean? Will my baby be alright? Do I need a caesarean? Will I need to be on insulin? What can I eat? Do I have to stop eating CHOCOLATE?!?!?! There is some debate against the use of routine testing to diagnose Gestational Diabetes, and also questioning about giving the diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes as a label on pregnant women. Dr. Sarah Buckley recommends avoiding routine testing for Gestational Diabetes for most women. Henci Goer and Dr Michael Odent are among many pregnancy and childbirth professionals who argue against diagnosing women with gestational diabetes, citing unnecessary stress and interventions as one of the risks of the Gestational Diabetes diagnosis. Nevertheless, whether you want to call it Gestational Diabetes or Pregnancy-Induced Insulin Resistance, or just high blood sugar levels in pregnancy, some women do have elevated blood sugar levels and need some extra help. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM or GD) is described as a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, and usually goes away 4-6 weeks postpartum. In a pregnant woman without Gestational Diabetes, the body works ‘as usual’. You eat, your stomach breaks down your food, you start to digest it, and the glucose from the carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Understanding Gdm | Gestational Diabetes Recipes

Understanding Gdm | Gestational Diabetes Recipes

Lisa said: Hi Hazeline. Good on your for making an impact with your BGLs... Read More Lisa said: Hi Jessica thanks for sharing your experience... Read More Lisa said: Hi Kandice. This is a store-bought bar and is an Australian example of a packaged snack that works within the GDM diet recommendations... Read More Lisa said: So glad you found us! And best wishes with your pregnancy... Read More Jess Thomson said: Hi there , thank you for the great information i have just been diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes and i wont be seeing my specialist till nxt week and im freaking out... Read More Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator I've been diagnosed with gestational diabetes. What should I do now? Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a (usually) temporary form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. It happens when the hormones made by the placenta during pregnancy make it harder for insulin to work. Insulin is a hormone that helps process your food and keeps your blood glucose level stable. If you cant make enough insulin your blood glucose levels will rise. High blood glucose levels can cause the baby to put on too much weight. This can impact on the babys wellbeing and your delivery and can affect the babys health later in its life. 17,000 pregnant women are diagnosed each year in Australia (around 5-8% of all pregnancies) and the risk is much higher in certain ethnic populations. Why test for gestational diabetes? What are the symptoms? Many pregnant women dont experience symptoms of diabetes (blood glucose highs or lows) and would otherwise go undiagnosed. Its important to test for gestational diabetes in order to prevent complications during pregnancy and childbirth. Who is most at risk of developing gestat Continue reading >>

Is It Too Late To Get Gestational Diabetes Test?

Is It Too Late To Get Gestational Diabetes Test?

Is it too late to get Gestational Diabetes test? Started by mandarins, Jan 19 2011 07:09 PM I am 30 wks pregnant in 2 days. I have not had my GD test done yet but was going to in next few days. I have heard that its suppose to be done between 26 -28 weeks. I dont think im hih risk and neither does my widwife but im still being urged to get it done as they say there are no obvious symptoms. My m/w is away for another week ... is it worth me still getting it done at this stage. I'd be happy not to bother and dont want the hassle of doing it if im too late to get an effective result anyhow. My pathology request form also say I need TFT (thyroid?) HIV (um, really doubt I got that) and Hb Ferritin blood group antibodies - not sure what that bit is? I know a friend of mine didn't have hers until after 30 weeks I think. She ended up having pretty bad GD. (because of work I had trouble scheduling an appointment). I believe the test is usually done earlier so that if you have it they can get it under control. If you have the test now it will still give an accurate result but obviously it could mean you may have had it undiagnosed for a while. I had mine at 32 weeks because I knew it was completely unnecessary. Only reason I did it in the end was they told me they would refuse me to deliver in the hospital birth centre if I didn't do it grr You can absolutely have the glucose challenge test at 31 weeks if you wish to do so. The aim of having it at 26-28 weeks is because gestational diabetes will have typically developed by then. The test is just as effective at 31 weeks as it is between 26-28 weeks. It does have a significant false positive rate, although the vast majority (~75%) of women who 'fail' the screening test GCT pass the GTT (which is the diagnostic test). Antibodies- Continue reading >>

Week 28: Testing Positive For Gestational Diabetes

Week 28: Testing Positive For Gestational Diabetes

How I'm changing up my routine as I head into the third trimester. I’m in the home stretch now. Just about 12 weeks (plus or minus) until I can finally meet my baby boy Finn! The main overriding themes right now are continued low back pain, and being sleepier than I have been. To help with the low back pain, I’ve employed an array of various pillows when I sleep. I don’t have the one many pregnant women seem to use—the full body pillow—but I do have the fantastic Boppy Pregnancy Wedge, which really does help me sleep better when I stick it under my belly. Besides that, I’m using my usual memory foam pillow under my head, and a regular cheap bed pillow between my knees. Although it’s a bit of a physical feat everytime I need to roll from one side to the other to arrange it all just-so, the pillow variety is keeping me comfortable enough to sleep through the night at the moment. My naps have increased in length and frequency. Now, it seems that I need a good 3 to 3 ½ hour nap at least 3 times a week. On the other days, I don’t nap at all. But when I do feel tired, it’s almost like I’ve been hit with a tranquilizer dart. Must lay down NOW! I am behind on some things I really need to get done, but I am not being too hard on myself about it. Everyone keeps telling me to enjoy the rest now, so that’s what I’m doing. A bigger piece of news to report: At 26 ½ weeks, my health care provider had me take the GTT, or glucose tolerance test, for gestational diabetes. I’ve been feeling so great that I really couldn’t believe it, but my test came back positive—just barely. Apparently, I’m just over the line into having the diagnosis. What exactly does this mean, I wondered. According to the American Diabetes Association, many pregnant women get it and Continue reading >>

I Am 28 Weeks And I Have Just Found Out That I Have Gestational Diabetes And Im Having A Few Issues Getting Used To The Idea

I Am 28 Weeks And I Have Just Found Out That I Have Gestational Diabetes And Im Having A Few Issues Getting Used To The Idea

I am 28 weeks and I have just found out that i have gestational diabetes and im having a few issues getting used to the idea I went for the tests due to my brother having type 1 diabetes and i though its just a procaution i wont have gestational diabetes and now ive been told i do and i feel abit shocked. Im not a large person and my babies not big for her gestation age either plus my diets gotten better than it used to be. could anyone please give me any advice or information about this if they have or have had it. Also this is my first pregnancy. I guess its just one of those things which can happen to a small majority of pregnant women then! Im sure ive read somewhere on-line that during pregnancy our bodies have a bit of a rough time breaking down & digesting most of the food we eat even if we dont actually feel like it so i wouldnt blame yourself too much for this hun, i guess it will just be a bit of a pain having to watch your blood pressure & etc...... Im on asprin for blood pressure already but i suppose. If my diet needs to be better ill have to adapt and im struggling to exersise due to a bad back I'm 38+2 and was diagnosed with gd at 23 weeks. I was put on insulin after 1 week of monitoring as I could not control with diet and exercise. I am petit and the only family history I have is grandfathers with diabetes in old age so there is really no reason for me to have it. At first I was terrified but reflecting back, it hasn't been as bad as I thought. Keep your carb intake down so that it is only a small portion of your meal and try to cut out sweet stuff altogether. Chose wholemeal bread, pasta and rice over white and eat lots of protein, I found chicken has kept me feeling full. I have managed to keep the baby at his normal size for his gestation and will b Continue reading >>

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

Blood glucose control is key to having a healthy baby A diagnosis of gestational diabetes can cast a shadow over the joys of pregnancy. While the vast majority of these cases end with a healthy baby and mom, gestational diabetes (high blood glucose during pregnancy in a woman who has never had type 1 or type 2 diabetes) does increase risks to the health of both baby and mother. Keeping blood glucose under control is crucial for women with gestational diabetes to help safeguard their babies and themselves. Gestational diabetes is caused by issues that arise as part of a normal pregnancy: hormonal changes and weight gain. Women whose bodies can't compensate for these changes by producing enough of the hormone insulin, which ushers glucose from the blood into cells to produce energy, develop high blood glucose and gestational diabetes. Overweight mothers are at a greater risk for the condition. In the United States, gestational diabetes is reported in somewhere between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies, but it is now believed that the condition affects 18 percent of women in pregnancy. The larger number is the result of new criteria for diagnosis, not just skyrocketing rates. The American Diabetes Association began recommending this year that gestational diabetes be diagnosed with only one abnormal test result rather than two, the previous method, and this is causing more cases to be detected. Gestational diabetes usually appears roughly halfway through pregnancy, as the placenta puts out large amounts of "anti-insulin" hormones. Women without known diabetes should be screened for gestational diabetes 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancies. (If high blood glucose levels are detected earlier in pregnancy, the mother-to-be may actually have type 2 diabetes, rather than gestati Continue reading >>

Smidge Of This: 28 Weeks Pregnant+ Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis

Smidge Of This: 28 Weeks Pregnant+ Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis

28 Weeks Pregnant+ Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis Hey there, third trimester! I can't believe that we are already at the 28-week mark. Yesterday my pregnancy took a little bit of a wonky turn as I received a gestational diabetes diagnosis. I am going to just stream-of-conscious write about this for a little bit if you don't mind. Here goes... So, I went to the doctor a little bit apprehensive of the glucose test (typically done 26-28 weeks from what I've read, and you fast for 2 hours, then drink a very sugary drink that contains 50 grams of glucose, then wait for one hour to see how your body processes it, and then get a finger prick to validate those results). The reason I was apprehensive was because I did not pass it the first go-round with Camille and I had to go back for the repeat 3-hour test. The three hour test consists of four blood draws (if I'm remembering correctly) and it had me waiting there at the lab for about 3.5 hours -- of course I left my book at home that day, too. So, basically it was a big pain in the neck (and crook of my arm -- OUCH!) just to find out that I did not, in fact, have GD. Yesterday I'm sitting there thinking, oh gosh, if I don't pass this first test, then I have to do that stupid repeat test, and now with a toddler! Have to plan it for a day when my mom can come into town to help me out or hire a babysitter. (At this point, I truly was dreading the repeat test more due to the time it would take ... didn't even cross my mind that my results from that repeat test would be anything different than a negative diagnosis, as they were with Camille.) I last ate at 11:00 yesterday for my 1:40 appointment. I had a few cheese cubes and two tablespoons of peanut butter -- a protein-filled snack that I was hoping would hold me over for lunch, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes At 28 Weeks

Gestational Diabetes At 28 Weeks

Hannah - posted on 01/16/2010 ( 7 moms have responded ) I just found out yesterday that I have Gestational Diabetes. I can't have a lot of fresh fruits and veggies, because I have a weird allergy. Any suggestions? Oh! I also can't have nuts! And also, any little treats that are safe to have? Krista-Thanks for the jerky idea! And string cheese! I can for sure have those! I'm not sure about soy nuts, but I'm pretty sure those are a no. LOL It is a lot of work so far and I just found out! Mary-My OB told me my risks, so that's good. The only thing that's bad is that I found out this past Friday, but they can't get me into a nutritionist until this coming up Thursday. So basically I'm on my own for a week. I did a TON of research as soon as I found out, so that's how I know what I know right now. I'm still confused as to how to stabilize my sugar level when I can't even test and see what it is. I won't get test strips or anything until the Tuesday after I see the Nutritionist! Basically what I've been doing is just watching how many sugars and carbs I eat. I researched what a good serving size is for certain foods and what a Gestational Diabetes food pyramid should consist of. But it's still really hard. Cause like this morning I woke up and I feel like I have a hangover. Is that too much sugar...or not enough?! I don't know! Did either of you have to have C-Sections? It IS a lot of work, I won't lie to you there. What worked well for me was to write down everything that I was eating, and what my testing glucose was an hour later. That way I could pinpoint foods that caused glucose spikes, and ones that were fine. I just took a look through the house to see if I could find my food journal, so that I could recommend some foods to you, but I can't find it. If I do, I'll PM y Continue reading >>

Just Found Out I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Freaking Out

Just Found Out I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Freaking Out

@Lex239 It sounds like you're already doing everything right. Don't freak out- you are probably at the low end of having complications. Just follow the nutritionists instructions and things will go smoothly. This is why everyone should have the Test and not bypass it because they want "no interventions"! You are on the right track - GD is a complex interaction of your hormones and metabolism and sometimes it can't be predicted. @Lex239 Are you sure they were testing your urine for sugar? I assumed the same, and I came to find out they were checking for protein. Either way, remember that gestational diabetes isn't something that you get from eating unhealthy or being overweight or all the usual culprits. You didn't do anything wrong!!! hugs @steelybone By the way your sugars have to go over 400 to start spilling into your urine - most people never get THAT high especially early on. That's why you can't go by urine to diagnose GD @laydylynx Ya, I'm pretty sure they were testing for protein for pre e. never heard of checking sugars through urine. And it's all just based on how your body digests sugar while pregnant, it has nothing to do with pre existing conditions. Our bodies go through a lot while pregnant. Just follow the diet and you and the baby will be fine. There are other complications besides the baby getting bigger. I was diagnosed with it early on in my pregnancy and I've lost about 10 lbs. so far and I'm about 27 weeks. I know that the chances are a little higher for your child to get type 1 diabetes later on in their life and your chances are higher to get type 2 later in life. I don't want to scare you but I just know it's a really serious thing but as long as you follow the diet plan and do lots of walking you will be fine. I had GD with my first pregnancy. Continue reading >>

28 Weeks Pregnant

28 Weeks Pregnant

Summary Week 28: your baby is putting on weight rapidly by storing fat under their skin, and their lungs are developed enough that they could breathe air if they were to be born early. Gestational diabetes may be diagnosed in the third trimester. Find out what lifestyle changes might help. Laying down fat in week 28 By the time you’re 28 weeks pregnant, your baby is fully formed and weighs just over 2lbs1. With the majority of their body systems working well, much of their development now centres around growth. Part of this involves laying down the fat stores1 that will keep them warm after birth. Your baby is so well developed at this stage that if they were born now, their lungs would be capable of breathing air, albeit with the help of a ventilator2. Have you heard your baby’s heartbeat recently? As your antenatal appointments become more frequent, your midwife will be checking it more often and you may be able to listen in, either through an ultrasound or a stethoscope. Their heart rate has slowed to around 140 beats per minute at this stage, and your partner may even be able to hear it by putting an ear to your abdomen1. As your baby grows, they have less space in your womb to move around, so you’ll probably feel even the smallest stretch or kick. Gestational diabetes Keeping a balanced diet while you’re pregnant is vital to ensure your baby gets all the nutrients they need to develop healthily. It’s important for your own health too. Some women develop gestational diabetes while they’re pregnant, usually in their third trimester3. There are a number of reasons why some women may be more likely to develop this condition than others, including being overweight and having a body mass index of over 30 before pregnancy4. "Some women develop gestational diab Continue reading >>

What Does Gestational Diabetes Really Feel Like?28

What Does Gestational Diabetes Really Feel Like?28

Just wondering as im blooming sure i have it. 20 week scan showed babys belly is on the 95th centile (indication of GD apparently) Does this mean our baby will be big? I'm tired, feel sick esp after eating, i feel like utter crap, headaches, blurry eyes, thirsty/dry mouth. NOW - midwife says it doesnt mean i have it, they can also be normal pregnancy issues. WHY do they test at 28 weeks? whats special about that time in pregnancy? how do i manage the way i feel without knowing if i have it or not? Im seeing consultant tomorrow, who has already said previously shes testing me at 28 weeks. i will mention all this to her, however, im betting she says no test before 28 weeks. Same as PP, if it wasn't got the GTT coming back positive I wouldn't have had a clue. Felt no different, just normal pregnancy tiredness and aches and pain. I'm now expecting DC2 and feel exactly the same as you and due to previous GD I'm undergoing regularly tests this time around and know I definitely do not have it (yet...there is still time!) It's worth mentioning if your worried about it, do you have risk factors? I doubt they would prevent you from taking a GTT if you requested one i should know all this really, with having had previous pregnancys. didnt have GD with them, BUT i certainly didnt feel like this either! emergency c-section with DS (growth issues) Planned c-section with DD 8lb 4oz (all from previous marriage) this pregnancy (IVF) - with new dh (well of 6 years) whats so special about the 28 week mark? (as thats when im having growth scans from too, is that when baby starts piling on weight??) I would never have known if I wasn't tested. I was in fact quite bad in that I had to have the insulin four times a day plus the metformin tablets three times a day. I couldn't control my sugar Continue reading >>

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