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Identify One Resource For Patient Support For Juvenile Diabetes

What Is Type 1 Diabetes

What Is Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system mistakenly turning on itself, destroying beta cells within the pancreas and removing the body's ability to produce insulin. Insulin allows the body to process sugar to create energy - without insulin, the body literally starves as it cannot process food. Treating Type 1 Diabetes The goal of type 1 diabetes management is to keep blood glucose levels as close to the normal range as possible. It sounds easy, but in reality, this is very difficult to achieve. To stay alive, people with type 1 diabetes must have a constant supply of insulin through injections or an insulin pump and they test their blood sugar by pricking their fingers at least four times a day. People with type 1 diabetes must be constantly prepared for potential hypoglycaemic (low blood sugar) and hyperglycaemic (high blood sugar) reactions, which can both be life threatening. Hypoglycaemia and Hyperglycaemia Hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) is a common and dangerous condition for many people with type 1 diabetes. It can be caused by eating less than usual, more exercise than normal or too much insulin administered. Hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) occurs when the body has too much food or glucose, or too little insulin. It can be caused by a clog in insulin pump tubing, missing an insulin dose, eating more than usual, stress or less exercise than normal. These low and high blood sugar level reactions show the constant balance that those with type 1 diabetes have to endure in their everyday life. Type 1 Diabetes Statistics Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children, it occurs more frequently than cancer, cystic fibrosis, multiple sclerosis and muscular dystrophy Approximately 2400 Australians are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes every Continue reading >>

Jdrf Resources Program

Jdrf Resources Program

To support you during the early days of diagnosis, JDRF supplies Diabetes Educators with specially developed packs for people and their families at type 1 diabetes diagnosis. These packs help patients understand how their life has changed, provide practical support and information and advice on how they can adapt. KIDSAC The JDRF KIDSAC pack program provides a free backpack for families with newly diagnosed children. The pack contains lots of valuable information including a: Caring for Diabetes in Children and Adults: A Parent's Manual ‘Rufus' the teddy bear who can help a child learn about injections A blood glucose testing meter t1d kit The t1d kit is designed for newly type 1 diabetes diagnosed older teens and adults to help you practically manage your diabetes. The stylish t1d satchel contains: 'Straight to the Point' - a comprehensive guidebook for adults with type 1 diabetes written by people who have "been there, done that". A diabetes sick day kit A book to help count fat and carbohydrate intake A blood glucose testing meter Straight to the Point Book The Straight to the Point book was written by people with type 1 diabetes and health care professionals, for adults and young adults with type 1 diabetes. It includes practical advice on day-to-day life with type 1 diabetes. You can download a digital copy of the Straight to the Point book here. Available from your Healthcare Professional These packs are available through your diabetes healthcare professional and are kindly supported by AMSL Diabetes, the distributors of OneTouch© Insulin Pumps and Glucose Meter Ranges and Dexcom© Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems. Both KIDSAC and t1d kit include The Traffic Light Guide to Food resource developed by the Sydney Diabetes Centre at Royal North Shore Hospital. Continue reading >>

New To Type 1 Diabetes? Information For Parents

New To Type 1 Diabetes? Information For Parents

If you’re like most parents who have just been told your child or teen has type 1 diabetes, it is a complete shock. Only about 10 percent of the time do we find a family history of type 1 diabetes. There is more to learn about what causes, prevents and cures type 1 diabetes. In the meantime, we must all work together to help your child live a long and healthy life. And yes, that is a realistic goal. Research studies show that people with type 1 diabetes who aim to keep their blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible can significantly lower the chances of life-threatening complications related to diabetes. What Goes Wrong The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was made because your child’s level of glucose (sugar) in the blood was above normal. This indicates that the metabolic system of checks and balances in the body is not working. Insulin is not being produced. Insulin is essential to escort the glucose from the foods we eat into cells of the body where it is critically needed to function properly. As a result, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. Your child may still be producing some insulin at this point, but in type 1 diabetes the pancreas loses all ability to produce insulin.The islet cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are gradually all destroyed, a process that we cannot at this point stop. Injections of insulin or an insulin pump are then needed to survive. Click here for more information on type 1 diabetes research at Joslin. Why Not an Insulin Pill? Insulin can’t be given orally because it is a protein and would be digested instead of getting to the bloodstream where it is needed. Just about all of the commercially available insulins now are genetically engineered as human insulin. Insulin comes in a variety of preparations that differ acc Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Learn how ultra-athlete Maggie Crawford manages her type I diabetes. Comprehensive Diabetes Care At UC San Diego Health, we recognize the work that adults with type 1 diabetes and their families do every day to live with this disease. Our goal is to equip you with: Evidence-based therapies to live well with type 1 diabetes. The best tools to manage blood glucose, including insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors. Education on diabetes management tools and therapies. Accurate, up-to-date information on diabetes and its complications. Responsive and reliable advice for managing the highs and lows of life with type 1 diabetes. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system protects us from viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi. In autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn’s disease or multiple sclerosis, the immune system attacks the body’s own healthy cells. Insulin In type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas (beta cells). Insulin is necessary for survival. Without insulin, the body can’t make use of food energy by allowing blood glucose to pass into our bodies’ cells. When the beta cells are destroyed, food energy — in the form of blood glucose — stays in the blood, where it can damage the rest of the body. To stay alive, people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin, either by injection multiple times a day or through an insulin pump (like the one shown here). Symptoms Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2 diabetes, accounting for approximately 5 percent of people with diabetes in the United States. Type 1 diabetes is generally diagnosed in children, but can come on at any age. The warning signs are: Extreme thirst Frequent urination Exhaus Continue reading >>

Kids With Diabetes Resources

Kids With Diabetes Resources

Information for Parents: Learning About Diabetes – provides visitors and health care professionals with simply written information on diabetes care. They try to use art and design in novel ways to help readers better understand diabetes. About Kids Health – Children health-related resources from the Hospital for Sick Children of Toronto Canada. They offer a very wide spectrum of thorough information on children physical and mental health issues. For information on Juvenile Diabetes in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, please refer to this link. Healthychildren.org – This website offers a great compilation of information by American Academy of Pediatrics. Here you will a lot of information about children’s health issues, childcare, and family well-being. For parents who have a busy life schedule, this website offers an audio playback function so that you can listen to the information while juggling with other duties. And to make the information available to Spanish speaking parents, all articles on this website can be translated into Spanish with one click of a button. For general information on Juvenile Diabetes, please click on this link. For information on Diabetes treatments, please click on this link. The Bump – A website catered to pregnant mothers and new parents. It covers topics related to pregnancy, baby and toddler care. ADA For Parents & Kids – The American Diabetes Association focuses on everything related to Diabetes. This area of org is catered specially to parents whose children have recently been diagnosed with Diabetes. Children with Diabetes – Offers a tremendous amount of information for children and parents about Diabetes. A Sweet life: The Diabetes Magazine – a great source of information on the latest news of Diabetes KidsHealth Continue reading >>

Care Of Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Care Of Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

A statement of the American Diabetes Association ADA, American Diabetes Association AER, albumin excretion rate CVD, cardiovascular disease DCCT, Diabetes Control and Complications Trial DKA, diabetic ketoacidosis EDIC, Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications EMA, endomysial autoantibody MDI, multiple daily insulin injection NCEP, National Cholesterol Education Program NCEP-Peds, National Cholesterol Education Program for Pediatrics SMBG, self-monitoring of blood glucose tTG, tissue transglutaminase During recent years, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has published detailed guidelines and recommendations for the management of diabetes in the form of technical reviews, position statements, and consensus statements. Recommendations regarding children and adolescents have generally been included as only a minor portion of these documents. For example, the most recent ADA position statement on “Standards of Medical Care for Patients With Diabetes Mellitus” (last revised October 2003) included “special considerations” for children and adolescents (1). Other position statements included age-specific recommendations for screening for nephropathy (2) and retinopathy (3) in children with diabetes. In addition, the ADA has published guidelines pertaining to certain aspects of diabetes that apply exclusively to children and adolescents, including care of children with diabetes at school (4) and camp (5) and a consensus statement on type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents (6). The purpose of this document is to provide a single resource on current standards of care pertaining specifically to children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. It is not meant to be an exhaustive compendium on all aspects of the management of pediatric diabetes. Howeve Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Resources And Support

Type 1 Diabetes Resources And Support

Find support you need when you need it most Whether you're interested in joining a vibrant online T1D community, in need of advice from someone who’s been there or looking for educational tools to help you or your loved one manage the disease—JDRF is here to help. Whatever your question and wherever you are, JDRF’s online T1D resource community connects you with others—online or in your area—who’ve been where you are. Support and information near you JDRF chapters offer a variety of events to inform, support and connect you with the T1D community. Along with several generous partners, we provide information to help you understand and better manage the daily burden of T1D to stay as strong and healthy as possible. When your child receives a diagnosis of T1D, it can feel overwhelming. As you adjust to life with T1D, you’ll find helpful information and support in the JDRF Bag of Hope®. The JDRF T1D Care Kit is a free resource providing information and tools to educate, support and inspire adults newly diagnosed with T1D. Toolkits for all ages and stages Our free T1D toolkits for parents, adults and educators are comprehensive guides that arm you with the knowledge, resources and confidence you and your family need to navigate life with T1D. Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Issues For Children And Teenagers

Diabetes - Issues For Children And Teenagers

On this page: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is a chronic and potentially life-threatening condition characterised by the body losing its ability to produce insulin or beginning to produce or use insulin less efficiently. People living with type 1 diabetes must inject insulin regularly, as must some people with type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes can manage their condition with careful diet, exercise and regular testing. Until recently almost all children and teenagers with diabetes had type 1, but now younger people are getting type 2 diabetes due to increasing rates of obesity and being overweight. Children or teenagers who have recently been diagnosed with diabetes may struggle with their emotional reactions to their condition and the reactions of others, and have concerns about going back to school. Teenagers with diabetes may also worry about things like negotiating sex, drinking alcohol, smoking and illicit drugs. A child and their family will need a period of adjustment after diabetes is diagnosed. They must establish a routine for blood glucose monitoring and injecting, learn how to count carbohydrates, see diabetes health professionals regularly and cope with fluctuating blood glucose levels. New challenges may arise as a child moves through different life stages. Reactions to a diagnosis of diabetes A child or teenager newly diagnosed with diabetes will have a range of reactions and emotions. Common reactions experienced by children and their parents include shock, denial, anger, sadness, fear and guilt. These feelings usually subside with time and appropriate support. Common responses to a diagnosis of diabetes include: anxiety about the condition fear of needles and multiple injections a feeling of being overwhelmed by injecting and other tasks t Continue reading >>

Resources For Children And Teens

Resources For Children And Teens

When children or teens have diabetes, it is most often type 1 diabetes. However, type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in young people. Learn more about the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and find out how to lower the risk of your child or teen getting type 2 diabetes. Youth and Teens NDEP offers information about diabetes in children and teens as well as tools and resources to help them manage their diabetes. Managing Diabetes at School Playbook Resources to help parents make a game plan for their child’s diabetes care at school. Diabetes Resources for Schools Students with diabetes are more likely to succeed in school when the student’s school health team and the student’s personal diabetes health care team work together. Transitions: From Pediatric to Adult Health Care Transitioning from teenage years to adulthood can be stressful for teens with diabetes and their families. Visit this website to find materials to help teens with diabetes make a smooth transition to adult health care. Eagle Books The Eagle Books for children and youth were developed by CDC’s Native Diabetes Wellness Program in collaboration with the Tribal Leaders Diabetes Committee and the Indian Health Service. They use stories to teach about the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and traditional ways of being healthy. Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Teenagers To Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Tips For Teenagers To Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes

Twitter Summary: @asbrown1 shares his top 10 tips for living w/ #T1D, straight from presentation to 100+ teens at #CWDFFL15 At the Children with Diabetes Friends For Life Conference this month, I had the incredible opportunity to speak to ~100 teenagers with diabetes. My talk, “10 Tips for Living Well with Type 1,” was a lot of fun to put together, and our team thought diaTribe readers might be interested in seeing it. I agonized over how to present this so that it wouldn’t come across as a lecture – even my teenage self would not react well to some of the advice (“Sleep seven hours a night? Hah! I have sports plus exams plus the next level to beat in Halo 3!”). I concluded that the best thing I could do was make this session a conversation, but ground it in lessons I’ve learned over time. Thankfully, I also had the amazing FFL staff by my side to help guide the discussion. The session reminded me of something that I intuitively know but often forget: each person’s diabetes is completely different, and what works for me won’t work for everyone. And equally important, what works for me may change over time – it certainly has since I was a teenager. I’m sharing the slides below in case they’re useful, but my biggest hope is that it gets you thinking about your own diabetes. What motivates you? What drags you down? What can you do better today? Who can you reach out to for support? Let us what you think by email or on Twitter. As the oldest of six kids, I had a lot of responsibility from a young age, and my Mom was also a very hands-off parent; both helped me take the reins of my diabetes from an early age. I hope everyone can find the right balance between taking care of their own diabetes, but also relying on their parents for support when needed. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Resources

Type 1 Diabetes: Resources

Organizations American Association of Diabetes Educators 100 West Monroe Street Suite 400 Chicago, IL 60603 Phone: 1-800-338-3633 Fax: (312) 424-2427 E-mail: [email protected] Web Address: The American Association of Diabetes Educators is made up of doctors, nurses, dietitians, and other health professionals with special interest and training in diabetes care. It can supply the names of these types of health professionals in your local area. American Diabetes Association (ADA) 1701 North Beauregard Street Alexandria, VA 22311 Phone: 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) E-mail: [email protected] Web Address: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is a national organization for health professionals and consumers. Almost every state has a local office. ADA sets the standards for the care of people with diabetes. Its focus is on research for the prevention and treatment of all types of diabetes. ADA provides patient and professional education mainly through its publications, which include the monthly magazine Diabetes Forecast, books, brochures, cookbooks and meal planning guides, and pamphlets. It provides information for parents about caring for a child with diabetes. Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International 120 Wall Street New York, NY 10005-4001 Phone: 1-800-533-CURE (1-800-533-2873) Fax: (212) 785-9595 E-mail: [email protected] Web Address: The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International's mission is to find a cure for diabetes and its complications through research. This organization publishes a wide variety of booklets on complications and treatments of diabetes. The organization's focus is on research for the prevention and treatment of type 1 diabetes. National Diabetes Education Program (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Continue reading >>

Jdrf Bag Of Hope

Jdrf Bag Of Hope

When your child receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D), it can be an overwhelming time. As you navigate this challenging period of adjustment to life with T1D, you can find helpful information and support through the JDRF Bag of Hope®. The JDRF Bag of Hope is filled with useful resources for both the child who has been diagnosed with T1D and his or her caregivers. Along with educational materials, we’ve included a special friend — Rufus, the Bear with Diabetes® — to show your child he or she is not alone while learning to take shots and test blood sugar. Resources in your JDRF Bag of Hope include (but are not limited to): Rufus the Bear with Diabetes “Rufus Comes Home” book “Pink Panther: A First Book for Understanding Diabetes” JDRF materials with educational video links “CalorieKing” book ACCU-CHEK® Aviva Connect blood glucose meter Information about Novo Nordisk/JDRF educational book series Novo Nordisk adjustable measuring scoop Informational postcard about the support Lilly Diabetes offers families with a bookmark Lilly Diabetes literature on severe hypoglycemia management Discount coupon for a stylish medical ID bracelet by Hope Paige Designs for your child Babysitter Guide provided by Omnipod® Glucose tabs in an Omnipod® tin “My Trip to Quest Diagnostics” coloring and activity book The JDRF Bag of Hope Program is made possible by generous funding provided by Co-Presenting Sponsors: Roche and Quest Diagnostics, and Supporting Sponsors: Insulet, Lilly Diabetes, Novo Nordisk and Hope Paige Designs. Only available for children (16 and under) who reside in the United States. Live outside the US? Was this helpful? Continue reading >>

Support For Parents: The Pep Squad

Support For Parents: The Pep Squad

Whether your family is new todiabetesor youre encountering a new set of challenges, the DRI Foundation is here to help. After all,we're in this together. Our PEP Squad -- Parents Empowering Parents -- offers emotional support and practical tips from professionals and fellow parents wholive with diabetes day-to-day. On ourprivate PEP Squad group on Facebook , you can connect with other diabetes parents, sharestories and struggles, complain, vent, or mentor and shed new light. Someone is usually "out there"at any time of day-- even in the wee hours after that 3 a.m. blood sugar check. Sometimes, all you need is to know youre not alone and thatsomeone else gets it. The DRI Foundation takes the opinions of this group seriously. We responded to members' concerns and because this is aclosed, or private, group, only approvedmembers are able to read posts. Some of the topics discussed include insurance issues, nighttime testing, travel tips, facing fears, holiday hints, bragging rights (about the brave kids!), tools, teens and tantrums. Whatever the issue, there are usually comments or suggestions. However, please remember that everyone is different, and you should check with your health care professionals before changing something your doctor had previously advised. Getmonthly news-you-can-use likebalancing life at work and athome, travel tips, parental grief, managing sick days, baby sitters and more. Learn from diabetes experts and parents just like you who might already have dealt with the same issue you're facing now. Sign up as a DRI Insider and we'll email the next "PEP Talk" to your inbox. Your child was just diagnosed with diabetes. Now what? So many parentshave asked this question.Our PEP Squad brochure can give you the answersand information on how to go on living y Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

The incidence of type 1 diabetes is growing at an alarming rate. View the latest figures and links to national public information resources below. Quick facts Approximately 400,000 people are currently living with type 1 diabetes in the UK, with over 29,000 of them children Incidence is increasing by about four per cent each year, particularly in children under five, with a five percent increase each year in this age group over the last 20 years Type 1 diabetes affects 97 per cent of all children with diabetes in England 90 per cent of people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have no family history of the condition Although it used to be referred to as ‘juvenile diabetes’, around half of newly diagnosed cases are in people over the age of 18 The UK has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world, for reasons that are currently unknown A person with type 1 diabetes will have around 65,000 injections and measure their blood glucose over 80,000 times in their lifetime Public information resources National Diabetes Audit – One of the largest annual clinical audits in the world. It measures the effectiveness of diabetes care against National Institute of Clinical Excellence clinical guidelines and quality standards. Quality and Outcomes Framework – This is the annual programme that details GP practice achievement results and rewards practices for the achievement of quality care. The QOF awards practices achievement points for managing some of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes being one. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Self-management Education In The Home – Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes - Inactive

Diabetes: Self-management Education In The Home – Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes - Inactive

The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) recommends that diabetes self-management education (DSME) interventions be implemented in homes of children and adolescents who have Type 1 diabetes on the basis of sufficient evidence of effectiveness in improving glycemic control among adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. The CPSTF has related findings specific to the following settings: Recreational camps (insufficient evidence) Worksites (insufficient evidence) Schools (insufficient evidence) Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is the process of teaching people to manage their diabetes. The goals of DSME are to control the rate of metabolism (which affects diabetes-related health), to prevent short- and long-term health conditions that result from diabetes, and to achieve for clients the best possible quality of life, while keeping costs at an acceptable level. DSME can be provided in a variety of community settings, including community gathering places, the home, recreational camps, worksites, and schools. Continue reading >>

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