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Ice And Heat Treatment For Injuries. Sprains; Strains; And Trauma | Patient

Ice And Heat Treatment For Injuries. Sprains; Strains; And Trauma | Patient

Heat and ice have been used for many years to treat pain and to reduce swelling, and many people have found them effective. More recently, studies have been done to investigate whether heat and ice really make a difference to healing and the results have been inconclusive. In general, when used sensibly, they are safe treatments which make people feel better and have some effect on pain levels and there are few harms associated with their use. Heat is an effective and safe treatment for most aches and pains. Heat can be applied in the form of a wheat bag, heat pads, deep heat cream, hot water bottle or heat lamp. Heat causes the blood vessels to open wide (dilate). This brings more blood into the area to stimulate healing of damaged tissues. It has a direct soothing effect and helps to relieve pain and spasm. It can also ease stiffness by making the tissues more supple. If heat is applied to the skin it should not be hot; gentle warmth will be enough. If excessive heat is applied there is a risk of burns and scalds. A towel can be placed between the heat source and the skin for protection. The skin must be checked at regular intervals. Heat should not be used on a new injury. It will increase bleeding under the skin around the injured area and may make the problem worse. The exception to this is new-onset low back strains. A lot of the pain in this case is caused by muscle spasm rather than tissue damage, so heat is often helpful. A large-scale study suggested that heat treatment had a small helpful effect on how long pain and other symptoms go on for in short-term back pain. This effect was greater when heat treatment was combined with exercise. Heat is often helpful for the following types of pain: Aching pains from fibromyalgia and other chronic pain conditions. Cra Continue reading >>

Disabilities And Medical Conditions

Disabilities And Medical Conditions

Medications Medications in pill or other solid form must undergo security screening. It is recommended that medication be clearly labeled to facilitate the screening process. Check with state laws regarding prescription medication labels. You are responsible for displaying, handling, and repacking the medication when screening is required. Medication can undergo a visual or X-ray screening and may be tested for traces of explosives. Inform the TSA Officer Inform the TSA officer that you have medically necessary liquids and/or medications and separate them from other belongings before screening begins. Also declare accessories associated with your liquid medication such as freezer packs, IV bags, pumps and syringes. Labeling these items can help facilitate the screening process. 3-1-1 Liquids Rule Exemption You may bring medically necessary liquids, medications and creams in excess of 3.4 ounces or 100 milliliters in your carry-on bag. Remove them from your carry-on bag to be screened separately from the rest of your belongings. You are not required to place your liquid medication in a plastic zip-top bag. If a liquid, gel, or aerosol declared as medically-necessary alarms, then it may require additional screening and may not be allowed Accessories Ice packs, freezer packs, gel packs, and other accessories may be presented at the screening checkpoint in a frozen or partially-frozen state to keep medically necessary items cool. All items, including supplies associated with medically necessary liquids such as IV bags, pumps, and syringes must be screened before they will be permitted into the secure area of the airport. Screening TSA officers may test liquids, gels or aerosols for explosives or concealed prohibited items. If officers are unable to use X-ray to clear these Continue reading >>

Ice And Heat Packs

Ice And Heat Packs

When you are injured or experience soreness or chronic pain, you may receive conflicting advice about what to do. Apply heat? Apply cold? Here's an overview of how to use temperature in the healing process. Popular and effective in treatments to ease pain and swelling from minor injuries, cold packs come in many different varieties. Some are sacks of gel that turn into ice packs in your freezer; others are packets designed to turn cold instantly with a simple squeeze, no refrigeration or freezing required. You can also make your own cold pack by wrapping some ice or a bag of frozen vegetables in a towel. Anyone who has ever sprained or twisted an ankle or pulled a muscle knows that cold is your friend. Bruises, insect bites, and repetitive strain injuries such as tendinitis, also respond well to treatment with cold packs. Cold therapy can help people with muscle spasms, whiplash, and various forms of arthritis as well. Cold packs are very effective at reducing swelling and numbing pain. An injury swells because fluid leaks from blood vessels; cold causes vessels to constrict, reducing their tendency to ooze. The less fluid that leaks from blood vessels, the less swelling results. Cold also eases inflammation and muscle spasms, two common sources of pain. The sooner you apply an ice pack to a sprain or strain, the sooner it can do its job reducing pain and swelling. For chronic problems such as low back pain or muscle spasms, ice whenever the symptoms start up. A general rule of thumb is to ice an injury over a period of 24 to 72 hours. Apply cold packs for periods of up to 20 minutes every two to four hours. When your skin starts to feel numb, it's time to give your body a break from a cold pack. What precautions should you take when using cold packs? Prolonged, direct Continue reading >>

Keeping Insulin Cool (win A Cool Pack Of Your Own!)

Keeping Insulin Cool (win A Cool Pack Of Your Own!)

Today, we're talking cool packs, with a chance to win one of your own! Be sure to read through to the Giveaway at the end of this post. Growing up in the mild climate of Oregon, I was raised to despise excessive heat. But you know what hates heat more than me? Insulin. Insulin is a fragile substance that does not do well in extreme hot or cold temperatures, and it's never more evident than in the sweltering heat of the summer months. Whether you're lounging at the beach, trekking through European towns, or just running errands, there's never a better time to think about the life of your insulin. Insulin + Heat: What Happens? The nitty-gritty of insulin science: it's a big protein that has the potential of breaking down into smaller proteins when exposed to heat. That basically leads to ineffectiveness (see high blood sugars!). Industry expert Charles Fraser, Senior Director of Medical Information Services at Sanofi, explained in a phone interview that the breakdown of insulin varies depending on the temperature to which the insulin was exposed and for how long, and we need to be particularly cautious about exposing insulin to temperatures over 86 degrees for any length of time. How long and how hot is risky? "If you went directly home from the pharmacy, within that short period of time the stability is not going to be impacted," Fraser said. "If you put the insulin in your car on a hot day and then went shopping, and the car was 135 degrees inside, and the insulin was in there for two hours? It is conceivable that insulin is already breaking down." But how can you tell if your insulin is going bad? You know, short of the sudden skyrocketing BGs? You might notice that your otherwise clear insulin is starting to look a little cloudy. Fraser says sometimes you can even see Continue reading >>

Tips For Using Heat And Ice

Tips For Using Heat And Ice

Both heat and ice can be great tools for treating pain, but they also carry risks. Here are some guidelines for using them safely: • Always put layers of fabric between your skin and the source of heat or cold. Doubled-up towels work well. • Monitor the temperature of your heat source, and do not use water, wax, or a heating pad that is hotter than 100°F. Temperatures over 120°F can cause dangerous burns. • Monitor your skin. When you have nerve damage, your sensation may not be as keen as it used to be. Rather than relying on your sense of touch to tell you if something is too hot or too cold, check your skin every few minutes for signs of irritation. You can expect your skin to be uniformly pink under the heat or ice. If your skin is red or patchy, you need more layers. • Do not put heat or ice on open wounds. This can irritate the wound, which may compromise healing. • Limit heat and icing sessions to 10 minutes at a time. Any longer than that really isn’t necessary and may cause skin irritation. • Never, ever sleep while using a plug-in heating pad. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

How To Keep Insulin Cold While Traveling

How To Keep Insulin Cold While Traveling

I'm often asked, how do you keep your insulin cool in the heat? Or how do you keep your insulin alive in the cold? My answer to that is always FRIO bags. I have taken my type one diabetes to the depths of cold, where I thought my insulin wouldn’t last the night, to the Atacama desert were I didn’t think it would last an hour. Knowing how to keep insulin cold while traveling is essential, and I can honestly say that if I didn’t have my Frio bags to regulate the temperature, I would have little, if not no insulin left. I have spoken before about why I think Frio is perfect and essential for diabetics, but I wanted to update on how it has actually saved my ass (insulin) on this trip so far. First up, Patagonia (How do you keep insulin cold without a fridge?) It is COLD at the bottom of the world- Ushuaia, and travelling in Patagonia hasn’t always left me with access to fridges to keep my insulin cooler- especially when camping outside or day tripping it to the Perito Moreno Glacier! It has been my Frio bags that have kept my insulin at fridge temperature so it hasn’t died. I hiked up my first glacier in Ushuaia, and it was absolutely freezing, I actually thought the Frio bags wouldn’t be able to handle this kind of cold, so was prepared to hold a insulin funeral- however, she never failed me! Atacama desert (How do you keep insulin cold without electricity, and in the heat?) This was the first time I had ever been to a desert! I am not actually a massive fan of heat, not just because it can increase my hypos which are just plain annoying, but I am so pale I burn like a tomato and never ever tan- and I like to wear makeup...in the heat..I cannot. Anyway, despite this, being in the desert was going to be an interesting challenge for my insulin. I thankfully did h Continue reading >>

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

Whether it is for business or pleasure, you have to pass through security before boarding your flight. The TSA allows for diabetes-related supplies, equipment and medication—including liquids—through the checkpoint once they have been properly screened by X-ray or hand inspection. If possible, pack all your supplies together in your carry-on bag so you have everything on hand. Before your screening begins, inform the officer conducting the screening about any supplies on you or in your carry-on. Here’s how you can fly through TSA with these 5 diabetes devices! 1. Insulin Pump/Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) Taking an insulin pump through airport security is quite common, but it’s always a good idea to carry the Airport Information Card when traveling. You may go through the airport metal detector with your insulin pump and CGM, as these devices are designed to withstand common electromagnetic interference. However, we do not recommend going through an airport body scanner with your pump and CGM, as Medtronic has not determined advanced imaging technology to be safe for insulin pump or CGM devices. If you do go through an airport body scanner, be sure to remove your insulin pump and CGM, but do not send your devices through the x-ray machine as an alternative. If you do not wish to remove your devices, explain to the officer that you cannot remove the insulin pump as it is under your skin with a needle, and request an alternative pat-down screening process. 2. Insulin Delivery Devices Be sure to have proof a physician prescribed your insulin and needles by providing a professional, pre-printed pharmaceutical label identifying the medication. Travel with your original insulin box and glucose meter that shows the pharmaceutical label. You will need these items in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Supplies Travel Bag Organizer And Essentials Eugo Diabetes Travel Case And Essentials

Diabetes Supplies Travel Bag Organizer And Essentials Eugo Diabetes Travel Case And Essentials

Shoulder and luggage handle strap for easy handling. Detachable dividers keep supplies organized and accessible while traveling. Shoulder and luggage handle strap for easy handling. Detachable dividers keep supplies organized and accessible while traveling. The Eugo case is exactly what I have been looking for in a diabetes travel case. In a world of dinky diabetes bags the Eugo reigns supreme. It is VERY well made and perfectly designed to fit a traveling diabetic's needs. The whole case is insulated to protect your insulin and other temperature sensitive supplies like test strips. It is designed to hold an icepack and wont leak! It even fits the largest of the Frio cooling sleeves perfectly. My favorite feature is the modular organizers in the main compartment. Pretty genius to take this idea from camera cases and apply it to a diabetes bag. My Eugo will for sure be traveling around the world with me from now on. I love the Eugo case. I bought one for my husband to carry his Type 2 diabetes medication and he also packs his meter and strips and lancets. I pack my Victoza pens in it and just insert an ice pack. It keeps everything in one place and its easy to just grab and take with us. Love it. 2 I packed my EuGo bag and got everything in for a 2-week trip, including double the number of infusion sets and CGM supplies! I'm very impressed with this bag! I've been looking for a bag to organize all of my diabetic supplies. This bag organizes it all, and you can customize the pockets for each item. There is an insulated pocket you can add a cold pack (not included) to keep your insulin cold while traveling. Everything I need to travel conveniently fits in this bag. The craftmanship and material is high quality and lightweight. I love rhis product, and will use it at home Continue reading >>

Diabetes Secure

Diabetes Secure

Welcome to our effective & amazing products Diabetes Secure specializes in unique and innovative solutions for persons with diabetes and/or weight problems! INSULWEAR: Unique clothing/ underwear with special pockets/openings for insulin pumps & insulin transportation. POCKETBRA:A stylish bra with pockets for insulin pump and valuables. INSULIN PUMP CARRYING BELT:To carry your Insulin Pump in a belt around your waist. DIASECURE (Featured in the 2018 Consumer Guide of Diabetes Forecast Magazine (by ADA): Our unique product DiaSecure makes life easier and more secure for insulin treated persons with diabetes using insulin pens. INSULCHECK: InsulCheck helps you to be secure when it comes to knowing when you last injected your insulin. See some InsulCheck videos here . FRIO & POUCHO:provides a highly effective, yet low-cost solution to the problem of keeping insulin at a safe temperature without the need for ice packs or refrigeration. MEAL MEASURE: Meal Measure is a very effective product that helps you to eat right and thereby assists in your efforts to achieve your target weight! MEALSIZER: Healthy eating made easy: With The Mealsizer you gain portion control a well-balanced diet with just the right amount of food. Free shipping on all ordersfor all countries, all over the world. Check out our promotions and read more about us here! Continue reading >>

Keeping Your Insulin Cool With Medactiv Travel Cases

Keeping Your Insulin Cool With Medactiv Travel Cases

One hurdle many people face is how to keep their insulin cool while out doing what they do, whether it be hiking up a mountain, relaxing on the beach, or any other time you may not be keeping your insulin on your kitchen counter. For those on multiple daily injections (MDI), keeping your insulin pens with you is essential, but how do you keep them from getting too warm — especially in the summer? Medactiv has a solution. Their travel bags have a special cooling pack on the inside that, when soaked in water, swells and keeps your insulin cool (not too cold like ice packs would). The packs work by holding on to the cool water and through the process of evaporation, cool the inside of the pouch. After soaking the special blue pack in cold water for 2 minutes, simply wipe excess water off (I did squeeze mine a bit to get a lot of the water out as well, but it still maintained it’s swollen appearance and cooling abilities), and place it in your travel bag along with your insulin pens. I received my sample bags (the Classic and the Single) just before my annual trip to the beach. I really wanted to put the packs to the test. So, as we were packing, I soaked my cool pack inserts and packed them away in my suitcase. For most of the trip, I used the small, single-pen pack to keep my fast-acting insulin with me on the beach. I did not keep my pack in the sunlight, but rather packed in amongst other beach essentials in my beach bag (towels, wipes, etc) which stays under a shaded tent. I just knew in the 90-degree heat that it wouldn’t last, but surprisingly, it worked very well for the 2 hours we would spend on the beach. For 2 days, I was able to keep my insulin pen cool in the pack. The larger pack can hold 3 insulin pens, but is also large enough to accommodate an insulin Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Travel -- 10 Tips For A Safe Trip

Diabetes And Travel -- 10 Tips For A Safe Trip

If you have diabetes, preparing for even daily activities can require advanced planning. So how do you prepare for travel, which can disrupt your diabetes care routine? Here are 10 tips for traveling when you have diabetes. #1 -- Keep your supplies close at hand. Whether you’re traveling by plane, train, or automobile, make sure your diabetes supplies are easily accessible. If you’re flying, be sure to put all of your supplies in your carry-on bags. Back-up insulin should also be kept in your carry-on, because checked baggage can be exposed to extreme cold or heat that can spoil insulin, and ruin glucometers. If you're using a device to keep your insulin cool, be sure it is a cold pack, and not a freezer pack--freezing insulin destroys its efficacy. The same rules apply for storing supplies while driving or on a train. #2 – Try to stick to your routine. Traveling can really throw people with diabetes off schedule, and at no fault of their own. The delay of a flight may mean sitting on the runway for hours, or if you’re traveling out of your time zone, it may mean feeling hungry when you should be asleep. When you have diabetes, you need to think ahead and stick to your routine as much as possible. If you pack extra snacks for the plane, you may want to store them in an insulated bag with an ice pack. Tracey Lucier, Nutrition Educator at Joslin Diabetes Center, also recommends writing your seat number on the bag and asking a member of the cabin crew to store it a refrigerated trolley. For a list of snacks that don’t need a cooler for storage, check out the list at right. #3 -- Get documentation. Carry a note from your doctor stating that you have diabetes, and need to have your medication with you at all times. If you’re going to a country where they speak a Continue reading >>

Ice Packs For Petsafe 2 Meal Feeder??

Ice Packs For Petsafe 2 Meal Feeder??

Hello everyone! My 2 new C20 Petsafe feeders just arrived today. I think they'll work great for Tucker and Sophie. HOWEVER..... does anyone know where I can get the ICE PACKS that fit in the bottom? Everywhere I check, they're out of stock. I'd like to get a total of 4. Thanks... Do you mean the Catmate C20 feeder? PetSafe doesn't have a C20 feeder. Try reusable ice packs that are meant for lunch boxes and the like. Some are gel-filled which can be smsuhed under the tray to keep the food cool. Rubbermaid has a gel sheet that can be cut to size. Rubbermaid has a few other types. You may be able to find a small hard plastic ice pack to use as well. Sorry, it's a PetSafe 2 meal feeder. The Rubbermaid gelsheet should work if I can't find the OEM parts. Thanks I never used an ice pack with my PetSafe 2 compartment feeder. There is room in the bottom of the feeder to put an ice pack if you want, you'd just have to find one that will fit. What some people do is freeze the canned food into small cubes, like with a silicone ice cube tray, and put the frozen cubes into the feeder. The food will slowly defrost at room temperature. Personally, I didn't like the PetSafe 2 compartment feeder. The timer can only be set in approximate 2 hour increments, it makes an annoying loud ticking noise that doesn't stop until you take the impossible to remove batteries out, and my cat was able to pry the lids off to get to the food and even flip the entire feeder upside down :shock: I use a different feeder that has an ice pack compartment, but I always found it way easier just to freeze the food and stick it in the feeder. Unless you want to feed the cat with the auto feeder within 2-3 hours or so, the frozen food works great. I portion it in tiny snack sized ziploc baggies and freeze a bunch Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ice Packs?

Diabetes And Ice Packs?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. So the hotel thing with the dog didn't work out (nice of the AC company but just not happening). We are back home, here in the hot and the kids want to have either ice packs or tupperware with cold water and ice on the feet. I noticed our gel ice packs have a warning that diabetics should not use them, but of course it does not specify T2 or T1. I'm leaning towards assuming that they mean T2, but in my son's best interest I thought I should ask those of you who would know better if there is any danger in using an ice pack for T1s? Every search I do leads to ads for packs that keep insulin cool. Not quite the info I am lookin' for. Any help would be, well, helpful. Thanks. Almost always those warnings only apply to diabetics with neuropathy. Doesn't usually apply to a healthy T1, and it's probably just a CYA move by the company who makes them... someone probably did something stupid and sued for "damages". LOL I have to laugh out loud because the thing about suing for damages. I am betting that's why my vacuum says I am not to put it in the dishwasher. Ok so he's pretty healthy still (knock wood). I suppose it wouldn't hurt to let him cool off a little while with an ice pack? Funny how I notice all the things that have warnings about Diabetes now. My first thought is "which type? it doesn't freakin say which type." Sigh. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you don’t realize how much STUFF you have to always carry with you wherever you go. The items only multiple as time goes on and more treatment methods are added, etc. So where are you supposed to keep everything from your meter, to extra test strips, emergency medications and more? For women, you can opt to keep everything in your purse, but most often this can become disorganized and only creates additional frustration when you have to find everything in a pinch. In this guide we’re going to take a look at some of the best diabetes carrying cases on the market for those with all types of diabetes and of any age. If you haven’t found a case yet, then this guide can help start you on your journey of purchasing the right one. Or if it’s time to update your case, you may find one that suits your needs. I know with my kids with Type 1 diabetes, in the beginning I would have to purchase a new case every few months because of the wear and tear from carrying them virtually 24/7 no matter where we go. That was before I knew which were some of the best ones that not only provide you with somewhere to nicely keep all supplies organized but are durable enough to withstand frequent use. Here are some of my all-time favorites. 1. Medicool Dia-Pak The Medicool Dia-Pak allows you to conveniently keep all your supplies in one organized place. What’s nice about this diabetes carrying case is it comes with a freezable ice pack that allows you to keep your insulin or other supplies cool when traveling. Keeping everything together in one bag without bulkiness can be tricky, especially when it comes to making sure you have all the supplies you may need. The Medicool Dia-Pak folds up nicely to fit into a purse, travel bag, suitcase, or even ca Continue reading >>

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