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Ice Cream Diabetics

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Yes, We Can!

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Yes, We Can!

The other day, after a casual dinner at home, my wife and I went out for ice cream. We'd opted to leave the air-conditioned safety of our home on this 90+ degree day, to head for an ice cream parlor that's just a short stroll from our house. As we stood there pondering the particular ice cream creations that sounded best, I glanced at my Dexcom CGM to see where my blood sugar happened to be and what that would mean for my carb counting and insulin dosing. Seeing a 97 mg/dL on my receiver, I smiled and rattled off the number to my wife who had already moved toward the counter to tell the clerk her decision. I rarely deviate from choosing either a plain scoop of vanilla, or an 'unfancy' single-scoop hot fudge sundae. But in this moment, I decided to go with a single scoop of rocky road, full of chocolatey goodness and riddled with marshmallows and nuts. I was treating myself, after all. A woman nearby had apparently overheard the first part of our conversation and realized I was talking about diabetes. She shot me a look before saying, "You can't eat that!" Without more than a second's hesitation, I shot back a quick, decisive response: "Yes, I can!" That started a back and forth that I would have preferred to avoid, about how this woman was nosing in on a private matter that didn't concern her -- one that she also had no personal insight into and no context as to who I was or how I was managing my diabetes and this particular food choice. It wasn't any of her business in the first place of course, but still she insisted that she knows a lot about diabetes and what PWDs can or cannot eat, since she has family members who happen to live with it. (((sigh))) We in the Diabetes Community know this type of person well. They're referred to as the Diabetes Police, who think they Continue reading >>

Ice Cream: Okay For Diabetics?

Ice Cream: Okay For Diabetics?

Expert Q&A I just learned that I am diabetic. Can I still eat ice cream? -Monica from Georgia Even though it is okay for diabetics to eat sweets such as ice cream, I always stress caution, as these foods are usually very high in calories and can wreak havoc on your blood glucose control. Moreover, they add empty calories to your diet and provide little nutritional benefit. With that said, if you decide to eat sugar or sweets, do so carefully. Do not merely add them, plan for them. The best way to do so is by first understanding how your blood sugar levels react to certain sweets. It is also a good idea to take your blood sugars before and after eating them. If you want to have ice cream for dessert, wait 2 hours after dinner, during which time you can go for a walk. Then, check your blood sugars. Take the right amount of insulin or oral medication, and check your blood glucose 2 hours later. If your blood glucose is below 160mg/dl, you body should be able to tolerate a small dessert. Examine the nutritional facts on the carton, focusing on the carbohydrate count. You should aim for no more than 30 grams of carbs, which is usually equal to one-half cup. It is easy to ingest far too many carbohydrates and calories when eating sweets. If you do eat foods that contain sugar, exercise a bit more than you usually do. This will help you burn off the extra calories and decrease the rise in blood sugars. In addition, many sugar-containing foods like ice cream and cookies are high in fat, so seek out low-fat, low-carb options. It may be a good idea to work with an experienced dietitian or diabetes educator to develop a meal plan that is both satisfying and keeps your blood sugars in check. Have a question for our Experts? Send it in! Continue reading >>

Are These 3 Ice Creams Diabetes-friendly To You?

Are These 3 Ice Creams Diabetes-friendly To You?

With the heat of summer the body often yearns for the cooling sensation of ice cream. This year for the first time since I learned two decades ago that I have diabetes I succumbed to the temptation. But until now I have refrained from writing about ice cream so as not to lead anyone too far down the slippery slope of gluttony, also known as pigging out. Few of us can limit our indulgence to 1/2 cup or less in a sitting. I can’t. But now that the fall equinox will arrive in less than a month we have only a short window left to test our willpower. So this is the time to review some of the relatively low-calorie, low-carb, and/or low-sugar ice cream brands on the national market. This is the other end of the richness spectrum from splurging on Häagen-Dazs or Ben and Jerry’s. It’s inevitably also at the other end of the taste spectrum. But that might be a good thing if that restrains us from binging on too much of a good thing. After long and arduous searching, I regret that I have not been able to find any brand or flavor of ice cream that I buy more than rarely or can recommend wholeheartedly. Actually, they all taste good enough for my unsophisticated ice cream taste buds, but each of the three of the brands that I’ve been able to find have some ingredients that I normally choose to avoid. Conveniently for our comparisons, each brand comes in a 1 pint container. Less conveniently, the Nutrition Facts panel on each container says that the serving size is 1/2 cup, undoubtedly due to the Food and Drug Administration’s size requirements. This is inconvenient, because in all of recorded history no one has ever succeeded in eating just a fourth of a 1 pint container of ice cream. The FDA has, however, begun to realize how unrealistic some of their service sizes are, Continue reading >>

Dr. Edelman On How To Eat Ice Cream With Diabetes

Dr. Edelman On How To Eat Ice Cream With Diabetes

Dr. Steve Edelman talks about something most of us love: ice cream. In this episode of The Edelman Report, Dr. Edelman, an endocrinologist living with type 1 diabetes explains how to properly enjoy ice cream with diabetes. As you’ll see below, it has to do with awareness and enjoyment as well as portion control. Check out the short video below to find out what this endo thinks about those who tell us we can’t have sweets. Photo Credit: Dr. Steve Edelman What is Type 2 Diabetes? The Basics Life with Type 2 Diabetes: Emotions & Mental Health: Family, Friends & Relationships Holidays Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Ice Cream?

Can Diabetics Eat Ice Cream?

By The Lifescript Editorial Staff Reviewed by Edward C. Geehr, MD It's getting warmer outside and pretty soon it'll be ice cream weather. But can you still enjoy frozen desserts if you have diabetes? Happily, the answer is yes: You can eat frozen desserts occasionally if you substitute them for other carbohydrates in your meal plan. The following tips from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) can help you choose: Watch the serving size (1/2 cup). If you eat more, double or triple the nutrient information to keep your count accurate. Watch the fat content, particularly the saturated fat. Light ice cream or yogurt contains about half the fat of the regular kind. And remember: Fat-free ice cream still has sugar, carbohydrates and calories. A no-sugar-added frozen dessert may still contain carbohydrate, fat and calories. Sweeteners commonly used in frozen desserts include aspartame and sugar alcohols such as sorbitol. Check your blood glucose after eating a frozen dessert to see how it affects you. To help you navigate your way through calorie-carb-fat counts in desserts, check out our diet ice cream taste test and below, ourfrozen dessert dietary guide. (All measurements are for a 1/2 cup serving): 133 calories, 16 g carbs, 7 g fat, 7 g saturated fat 100 calories, 14 g carbs, 4 g, fat 3 g saturated fat Fat-free ice cream(Lowest in calories and fat!) 90 calories, 20 g carbs, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat No-sugar-added ice cream(Lowest in carbs!) 100 calories, 13 g carbs, 4 g fat, 3 g saturated fat 132 calories, 29 g carbs, 4 g fat, 3 g saturated fat 92 calories, 23 g carbs, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat Reprinted from 101 Nutrition Tips for People with Diabetes by Patti B. Geil and Lea Ann Holzmeister. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All r Continue reading >>

Ice Cream For Diabetics That Doesn't Raise Blood Sugar

Ice Cream For Diabetics That Doesn't Raise Blood Sugar

You may think ice cream is off-limits if you've recently been diagnosed with diabetes -- especially since many varieties are high in sugar and cause your blood glucose to rise rapidly. If you're looking for sugar-free varieties that don't raise blood sugar, the bad news is ... there aren't any. You can find ice creams labeled "no sugar added." However, these contain carbohydrates and naturally occurring sugars, which raise blood glucose. The good news is you can still fit ice cream into your diabetes meal plan. Video of the Day No Sugar Added: The Not-So-Sweet Truth The "no sugar added" varieties of ice cream are sweetened with sugar substitutes such as sugar alcohols and sucralose, better known as Splenda. However, this doesn't make them sugar-free. Most "no sugar added" varieties are made using milk, which contains lactose -- a naturally occurring sugar. In addition, some sugar substitutes contribute carbohydrates and raise blood sugar, though not as dramatically as table sugar. What's more, some people find the taste of ice cream sweetened with sugar substitutes unpalatable. It's Not Off-Limits: Here's Why People with diabetes aim to eat a predetermined, consistent amount of carbohydrates at each meal -- 45 to 60 grams is about right for most people, according to the American Diabetes Association. It's common to think that you must avoid all forms of sugar when you have diabetes, but this isn't the case. As long as the total amount of carbs at a given meal remains within your target, you can fit sweet treats in every now and then. Eat sweets with your meal, instead of separately, so that you're consuming nutritious components such as protein and fiber, which help stabilize blood sugar. Make adjustments in your meal when planning to compensate for the ice cream. For e Continue reading >>

Going To The Grocery Store With Diabetes: The Ice Cream And Frozen Novelty Aisle

Going To The Grocery Store With Diabetes: The Ice Cream And Frozen Novelty Aisle

Yes, it may be one of the colder sections of the grocery store, but the frozen dessert aisle is also the source of happy memories and the centerpiece of many celebrations. For those of us with diabetes, frozen confections were probably one of the first types of food that passed through our minds with a big red X on them as we got the news of our diagnosis. But now we know they don’t need to be condemned. Ice cream and frozen novelties can have a place in the diets of people with diabetes. Let’s discuss a few things about how we can have our ice cream cake and eat it too! First off, ice cream and frozen yogurt — what is the difference? In a blog entry I wrote on my own site a couple years ago, I explain in detail how each differs in calories and carbohydrates. Here is a summary of what I uncovered: Frozen yogurt is not necessarily the best option, especially for people with diabetes. While it is usually low in fat or fat-free, the fat has often been replaced with more sugar to add flavor. Also, frozen yogurt, depending on the brand, can contain unappealing ingredients such as corn syrup, artificial colors, and preservatives. Also, note that soft-serve ice cream is not frozen yogurt, a common point of confusion. Ice cream in all its dairy richness is generally higher in fat and lower in total carbohydrates than its frozen yogurt counterpart, and it is often more natural. I may be a bit biased, but I personally would rather have a bowl of full-fat ice cream that I know will have a more predictable effect on my blood sugar (with a delayed rise due to the fat), rather than a bland frozen yogurt that will spike my numbers more quickly because of the higher sugar and lower fat content. At the end of the day, it is a personal choice. But just know that you can absolutely Continue reading >>

Frozen Yogurt Vs. Ice Cream…what Does It All Mean For Diabetics?

Frozen Yogurt Vs. Ice Cream…what Does It All Mean For Diabetics?

I don’t think one summer goes by without hearing someone say “well, you know frozen yogurt is better for you anyways.” Being the dietitian diabetic that I am, I know in the back of my mind there is an exception to that statement, but I am usually too busy stuffing my face with ice cream to retaliate. I decided it would be helpful to give a breakdown of the difference between frozen yogurt, ice cream, and regular soft serve. There are pros and cons to point out about this dairy family of creamy-melty goodness, and even more importantly are the nutrition facts to point out that make a BIG difference for those of us burning the gears of our insulin pumps each and every summer as we indulge in these treats. Ice cream is made with different kinds of dairy, either cream or milk. While most frozen yogurt is made with milk instead of cream, keep in mind that not all kinds are made from fat-free milk. The calories and fat content will automatically be higher if either is made with whole-fat cream or whole-fat milk. Ice cream is made from milk fat, milk solids, sweeteners (sugar or artificial ones), flavorings, stabilizers and water. Frozen yogurt usually contains yogurt culture, milk solids and milk fat, gelatin, corn syrup and other flavorings. Ooh yum, bet you didn’t know there was corn syrup in frozen yogurt? Isn’t that fantastic for diabetics? (insert sarcastic face here). Is Frozen yogurt healthier? Well, it depends on which kinds of frozen yogurt you are comparing to which kind of ice cream. There are low-fat, fat-free, and sugar-free versions of both. Don’t just assume because you are eating frozen yogurt that it is ‘healthier for you’. While the non-fat versions are wonderful in that they don’t add unwanted fat calories to your waist line, they are so h Continue reading >>

Best Ice Creams For Diabetics

Best Ice Creams For Diabetics

Best Ice Creams For Diabetics: 5 Questions To Ask Yourself To help you both lower your blood sugar (glucose) and shed excess weight (which is often vital for diabetes control), the faculty at the Pritikin health resort suggest that you ask yourself the following 5 questions: 1 How much am I scooping out? Turn around any container of ice cream and you’ll likely see on the Nutrition Facts label that the serving size is a half cup. A level half cup. That’s the same size as those little single-serving containers of Jello pudding or Activia yogurt. Yep, four or five bites and it’s all over. So unless you’re being really careful (or using teeny-tiny bowls), you’re probably scooping out at least a cup, which means twice the calories, twice the artery clogging saturated fat, and twice the sugar that’s listed on the label. 2 Am I keeping a lid on sugar? It’s difficult to know exactly how much added sugar a serving of ice cream contains because the number you see for grams of sugar on the Nutrition Facts label includes added sugars as well as the naturally-occurring (and Pritikin-friendly) sugars from the milk and fruit ingredients. 100 calories Suffice it to say that if you’re sticking with fat-free ice creams and frozen yogurts that have 100 calories or fewer per serving, you’re probably not getting more than 3 teaspoons of added sugar, point out the Pritikin dietitians in their nutrition workshops at the health resort. But keep in mind that 3 teaspoons of added, refined sugar is still a lot, particularly if you’re concerned about your blood glucose and triglyceride levels, not to mention your waistline. The doctors and dietitians at Pritikin are far from alone in their concerns about added sugars. The American Heart Association now recommends no more than 6 Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating with Diabetes: Desserts and Sweets By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 11/22/2010 Id be willing to bet that most everyone has been toldand therefore believesthat people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. Its best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you dont miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan . The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same a Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Winning Ice Creams

What To Eat With Diabetes: Winning Ice Creams

The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 best consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved finalists or winners. We conducted blind taste panels for more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated ice creams our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. The next time you're craving a bowl of ice cream, scoop up one of our 16 bes Continue reading >>

Revisiting Ice Cream And Diabetes

Revisiting Ice Cream And Diabetes

In case you didn't get the memo: Yes, those of us with diabetes CAN eat ice cream. Even though some outside the diabetes community don't think so, and they try to convince us we can't or shouldn't, the fact remains that an ice cream sundae or vanilla waffle cone every once in a while isn't going to kill us. It's not the cause of any type of diabetes, either, and we're not promoting unhealthy eating by enjoying some ice cream on a special occasion. That was the message last summer, when the Diabetes Online Community (DOC) lit up in response to an Indianapolis newspaper columnist's published rant that diabetics can't or shouldn't eat ice cream — and that any organization using ice cream to raise money to send children with diabetes to camp has sold its soul to the devil. Yes, he actually wrote that. And we in the DOC responded. Loudly. Far and wide. (The newspaper has since removed the article - !) And there was ice cream. Now a year later, we're again sending the message that ice cream is OK. But more importantly, the message is that myths, stereotypes and misinformation about diabetes really hurt. They hurt fundraising, the general public's awareness, and the emotions of kids who are made to feel different and that they "can't do this" simply because of their diabetes. The Diabetes Youth Foundation of Indiana (DYFI) is hosting its 23rd annual Ice Cream On the Circle event July 13 in downtown Indianapolis, sponsored for the second year by the American Dairy Association of Indiana. Last year, more than a thousand people floated in and we raised $6,400 to help send children and teens with diabetes to our D-camp, called Camp Until a Cure. And it also helped raise some great awareness for the broader diabetes community, conveniently right in the middle of National Ice Crea Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Fighting The Wrong Battle

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Fighting The Wrong Battle

My brother Sam does not have diabetes, but he and I think alike when it comes to diet and nutrition. We both agree that carbs and sugar are not good for people with diabetes, or for anyone else. So I wasn’t surprised, but I was delighted, to find he’d published a hilarious article in this week’s NYT’s Sunday Review poking fun at the The New Yorkers for Beverage Choices organization (and more). The New Yorkers for Beverage Choices opposses New York City Mayor Bloomberg’s proposal to a ban the sale of sugar-sweetened beverages over 16 ounces in restaurants, movie theaters, sports venues, coffee shops, pizza shops, delis, food trucks or carts. According to their website, New Yorkers for Beverage Choices believes New York City residents and visitors should have the right to buy beverages in any size they choose. This reminds me of 2010 Krispy Kreme Challenge, an event wherein participants ran a mile or so, ate up to a dozen doughnuts, and then ran back. The event took place in order to raise money for JDRF. On a website that no long exists the following was posted, “the theme of this year’s JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes is “Freedom” (freedom from diabetes), so people are participating in this event so that those with type 1 diabetes will have the freedom to eat donuts.” My brother, in his satirical Bill of Rights, points out, “A well-stocked fridge, being necessary to the stuffing of the face, the right of the people to consume alarmingly large sandwiches washed down by more than 16 fluid ounces of soda shall not be infringed; nor shall any person have to answer for the number of sticky buns consumed in a single sitting, except in a time of public danger, such as a Congressionally declared sticky-bun shortage.” So back to the beverage ban, do I think th Continue reading >>

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Ice cream does not have to be strictly off limits for people with type 2 diabetes. While it is still best to enjoy ice cream in moderation, there are ice cream and frozen yogurt choices out there that will not derail a healthful diet. People with type 2 diabetes have more to think about than simply ruining their diet with ice cream. Their main concerns are about how ice cream will affect their blood sugar levels, since controlling this is critical to managing diabetes. While people with diabetes can include ice cream as part of their healthful diet, it is important for them to make informed decisions about what ice creams they should eat. Understanding ice cream sugar servings Most ice cream has a lot of added sugar, making it something a person with diabetes should avoid. Because of this, one of the first things they should consider when choosing an ice cream is the sugar content. People with diabetes need to understand how their ice cream indulgence fits into their overall diet plan. Here are a few facts for people with diabetes to consider: Every 4 grams (g) of sugar is equivalent to 1 teaspoon. The more sugar that is in the ice cream, the more carbohydrates it has. An ice cream serving with 15 g of carbohydrates is equal to 1 serving of carbohydrates. Any carbohydrates in ice cream will count towards the total carbohydrate goal for the day, which will be different for each person. Protein and fat found in ice cream can help slow absorption of sugar. Choosing an ice cream higher in protein and fat may be preferable to choosing a lower fat option. A suitable portion of ice cream for somebody with diabetes is very small, usually half a cup. But most people serve much more than this. It is crucial that a person with diabetes sticks to the proper portion size, so they kn Continue reading >>

Diabetic Homemade Ice Cream

Diabetic Homemade Ice Cream

Edible but not tasty. We've been making homemade ice cream for a number of years in our bucket ice cream churner. As another reviewer noted, the recipe calls for egg but gives no instructions to cook the mix to form a custard and eliminate egg-borne disease. Perhaps it is an oversight. It needs to be corrected. We cooked the ingredients and made a custard before freezing it in the ice cream churner. With this correction, and the use of real vanilla bean we made the recipe as directed and found the result bland, with little flavor. It wasn't awful; it just wasn't particularly good. It certainly didn't leave any of us wanting seconds. The recipe does not call for any salt, so you may want to add 1/4 teaspoon. Perhaps this will improve the flavor enough to make it enjoyable. This recipe looks promising, but as it stands, I have to say that the result was disappointing. The proof is definitely not in the tasting of this pudding. Continue reading >>

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