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Ibuprofen Diabetes

Ibuprofen Can Help Diabetes And Dementia Patients From Growing Old Before Their Time | Daily Mail Online

Ibuprofen Can Help Diabetes And Dementia Patients From Growing Old Before Their Time | Daily Mail Online

It already works wonders on pounding headaches. But ibuprofen could also hold the secret to a long and healthy life It already works wonders on pounding headaches. But ibuprofen could also hold the secret to a long and healthy life. In a series of remarkable experiments, the popular painkiller gave ageing mice a new lease of life. Researchers from Newcastle University say it might help people with age-related illnesses such as diabetes and dementia from growing old before their time. While it is unlikely to improve their illness, the inexpensive drug might slow its progression and help prevent them from developing other debilitating conditions. As surprising as this might seem, researcher Thomas von Zglinicki said it is not unusual for a drug that is developed to treat one thing to have other powers. At the heart of Professor von Zglinickis theory is the inflammation that causes pain, swelling and fever we experience when our body is fighting off an infection. This inflammation is also present in a milder but longer-term form in age-related diseases such as diabetes, dementia and arthritis. Using GM mice, the professor showed that far from being a result of ageing, this inflammation helps drive it. Mice with genes that made them particularly prone to inflammation aged twice as quickly as normal animals. Just like people, their hair turned grey and fell out, they lost weight, became unsteady on their feet and had heart problems. They also lived half as long as usual. In a series of remarkable experiments, the popular painkiller gave ageing mice a new lease of life Tests showed that the inflammation triggered a chain of reactions that led to cells going to sleep, rather making new copies needed to help keep the body and its organs young. Treating the mice with ibuprofen Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen And Diabetes?

Ibuprofen And Diabetes?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I'm having a bit of neck and shoulder pain at the moment, it occurs maybe once or twice a year. I get it across my shoulders and sometimes up into the back of my head and down the top of my arms. I went through a barrage of tests with my Doctor a few years ago and we could not find any cause, Doc suspects it may be stress, he might be right Anyhow, Sunday night I had a bad nights sleep, woke at about 2.30am and slept badly for the rest of the night, I could feel the neck pain starting. Guess that's what I get for going to be too early (10.30pm) on Sunday. I was so tired yesterday morning I took a day off work. One of my work colleagues is a Type 1 and said that his wife had been told by a pharmacist that diabetics should not take ibuprofen. I would normally take ibuprofen to get some relief when this pain hits, I'm not a big pill taker (other than the ones I have to take ) but I did find that the ibuprofen worked for me for this pain. Now I'm a little confused, because my colleague was fairly certain that I should avoid ibuprofen, yet I know I saw posts here where people had mentioned using it. Can anyone shed some light on this for me? I try not to take any more pills than necessary, myself. However, I have periodic flare-ups of pain in my shoulder, from constant computer use. The ONLY thing that gives me relief is naproxen (another NSAID like ibuprofen). It's a trade-off to me. I'd rather risk it now and be able to sleep than lose sleep because I'm hurting, which in turn runs up my blood pressure, and eventually, my BG, because of the stress of the pain. I just try to take it at the low Continue reading >>

Cardioprotective Effects Of Aspirin And Concominant Use Of Ibuprofen Or Diclofenac For Pain Management In Patients Diagnosed With Diabetes Mellitus

Cardioprotective Effects Of Aspirin And Concominant Use Of Ibuprofen Or Diclofenac For Pain Management In Patients Diagnosed With Diabetes Mellitus

Cardioprotective Effects of Aspirin and Concominant Use of Ibuprofen or Diclofenac for Pain Management in Patients Diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus Patients with diabetes are at Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of heart disease and aspirin (ASA) is recommended for its cardioprotective effect in this population. Many diabetes patients need analgesics for pain management. A recent study found that some analgesics may moderate or remove the cardioprotective effect of ASA. The researchers studied the cardioprotective effects of ASA alone and in conjunction with ibuprofen, diclofenac, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and found that patients with known cardiovascular disease who took low dose ASA and ibuprofen had increased risk of cardiovascular mortality than those on ASA alone. [br]We use the mortality risk ratios reported in the earlier study to estimate the effect of using ASA with diclofenac as compared to ibuprofen on life expectancy of 50 year old patients with diabetes mellitus.[br]This study uses a decision analysis approach to examine the interaction between the cardioprotective effect of ASA and selected analgesics in persons with diabetes. Survival for a hypothetical cohort of 100 diabetes patients was estimated in a Markov-Cohort model simulation.[br]The average life expectancy for 50-year-old patients with diabetes mellitus who are on ASA is 19.44 years. Those on ASA and ibuprofen or ASA and diclofenac have a life expectancy of 16.88 and 20.35 years respectively. These results are quite sensitive to the relative risk parameters used.[br]Our model indicates the use of ibuprofen for pain management in patients with diabetes could reduce expected survival by as much as 2.5 years by negating the cardioprotective effect of ASA. T Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen Effects On Blood Sugar In Diabetics

Ibuprofen Effects On Blood Sugar In Diabetics

Diabetes is a complex disease, and keeping your blood sugar in control requires more than just counting carbohydrates. Many outside factors, including over-the-counter medications like Ibuprofen, may have an impact on your glucose levels. Diabetes Drug Interactions Ibuprofen may cause an adverse reaction in a diabetic taking oral medication to control his blood sugar, like Diabinase or Orinase. This can lead to unusually high or low blood sugar readings. General Effect on Blood Sugar Readings Aside from the potential diabetes drug interactions mentioned above, Ibuprofen should not cause blood sugar levels to drop or spike noticeably. Frequency Taking Ibuprofen every once in awhile, even if you have diabetes, is generally considered safe. However, regular or prolonged use of Ibuprofen is where problems occur. Discuss diabetes-friendly alternatives with your doctor if you have an ongoing need for NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Kidney Complications Multiple studies have linked the regular intake of Ibuprofen with increased chance of kidney failure. Since diabetes already increases your risk for kidney complications, Ibuprofen may worsen these odds. Blood Pressure Drug Complications If you have high blood pressure–a common occurrence among diabetics–you should also be aware that Ibuprofen can negate the effects of many blood pressure medications, including many beta blockers, diuretics, and ACE inhibitors. Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Metformin With Ibuprofen?

Is It Safe To Take Metformin With Ibuprofen?

Home Q & A Questions Is it safe to take Metformin... Is it safe to take Metformin with Ibuprofen? Is it safe will taking a course of metformin to take painkillers such as ibuprofen? My wife is currently on a course of metformin and has bad pains in her teeth with her wisdom tooth. Is it safe to take ibuprofen while still taking metformin? Currently there is not evidence of interaction between metformin and NSAIDs (e.g. ibuprofen) in the literature. But it doesn't mean that it's absolutely safe to take these two drugs together, better consult your doctor. My husband has been taking Met for years and has never had a problem with pain killers with it. I've been on Metformin for over 4 years and I've taken Ibuprofen many times and never had a problem. I've also taken Excedrin migraine with my Metformin and been fine and also taken Asprin with my Metformin and been fine. I had trouble with Pepto-Bismol though. You're not supposed to take it when your on diabetic type medications.. I tried it anyway and regretted it! I wouldn't take it at the same time... wait 2 or 3 hours. you never know the reactions. Last year I took two pills (the dr. told me it was ok to take them together) well, my head spin around for two days, blood pressure went very low etc etc. I still don't know which pill did this. Right on! I had the same experience! May be a doctor will downplay it as too anecdotal to have any scientific foundation, but the medical establishment is conservative by nature and sometimes they miss out relevant facts.. Perhaps necessarily so, to counter the many unscientific quackeries advanced by people who are more interested in peddling their ware, (even doctors like Dr Oz.) than in scientific truth. Here are the issues, maybe somebody can comment on them. I am a 76. man . I ha Continue reading >>

Effects Of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs In Conventional Dosage On Glucose Homeostasis In Patients With Diabetes

Effects Of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs In Conventional Dosage On Glucose Homeostasis In Patients With Diabetes

Effects of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs in Conventional Dosage on Glucose Homeostasis in Patients With Diabetes This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Larger-than-conventional doses of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to lower plasma glucose levels. This phenomenon has raised the questions whether or not NSAIDs in conventional dosage can be used for the treatment of hyperglycemia in patients who have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and whether or not NSAIDs added to preexistent hypoglycemic drug therapy taken orally may lead to unanticipated hypoglycemia. In this study we evaluated aspirin, sodium salicylate and ibuprofen given in conventional dosage to hyperglycemic patients with adult-onset (type II) diabetes. Half the patients were usually treated for hyperglycemia by means of diet only and half with diet plus hypoglycemic drugs given orally. Significant changes in plasma glucose levels were not seen after the administration of a combination drug containing aspirin and magnesium-aluminum hydroxide (Ascriptin, 650 mg three times a day; glucose change = 23630 to 23631 mg per dl) or sodium salicylate (600 mg three times a day; glucose change=28476 to 27384 mg per dl). A statistically significant but small change was seen with the administration of ibuprofen (600 mg three times a day; glucose change=19660 to 17947 mg per dl) but not when giving ibuprofen (300 mg three times a day; glucose change=26778 to 28260 mg per dl). The results of this study indicate that conventional doses of NSAIDs should not be used for treating hyperglycemia and that, since the additive hypoglycemic effect of NSAIDs in conventional doses was minimal or negligible, they can be used safely for other purposes in diabetic patients taking hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Go Easy On The Advil, Motrin, Ibuprofen Etc.

Go Easy On The Advil, Motrin, Ibuprofen Etc.

Another study has added to the evidence we already have that suggests that nonsteroidal antinflamatories, the "non-aspirin pain killers" you buy over the counter at the pharmacy are bad for you. The latest study, published in the journal Neurology was hoping to prove that taking these drugs would lower the incidence of dementia. Instead it found the opposite. Here's the study: Risk of dementia and AD with prior exposure to NSAIDs in an elderly community-based cohort. J. C.S. Breitner et al. Neurology 2009, doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181a18691) The researchers "followed 2,736 dementia-free enrollees with extensive prior pharmacy data, following them biennially for up to 12 years to identify dementia and AD." What they found was: Contrary to the hypothesis that NSAIDs protect against AD, pharmacy-defined heavy NSAID users showed increased incidence of dementia and AD, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.66 (95% confidence interval, 1.24–2.24) and 1.57 (95% confidence interval, 1.10–2.23) This did not surprise me at all, for reasons that were not cited in any discussions of this study. Many people do not realize heavy use of NSAIDs has been linked to high blood pressure and that there appears to be a lifetime dose that dramatically raises the risk of developing end stage kidney disease. I have written about this with appropriate journal citations HERE. One of the studies cited on that page, published in Archives of Internal Medicine , concluded: [Men] who took acetaminophen six or seven days a week had a 34% higher risk of hypertension. Those who took NSAIDs six or seven days a week had a 38% higher risk and those who took aspirin six or seven days a week had a 26% higher risk. High blood pressure is a known cause of vascular dementia, and the older and more fragile people ar Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen - Oral (advil, Motrin, Nuprin) Side Effects, Medical Uses, And Drug Interactions.

Ibuprofen - Oral (advil, Motrin, Nuprin) Side Effects, Medical Uses, And Drug Interactions.

GENERIC NAME: IBUPROFEN - ORAL (eye-byou-PRO-fen) Warning | Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage WARNING: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including ibuprofen ) may rarely increase the risk for a heart attack or stroke . The risk may be greater if you have heart disease or increased risk for heart disease (for example, due to smoking , family history of heart disease , or conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes ), or with longer use. This drug should not be taken right before or after heart bypass surgery ( CABG ). This drug may infrequently cause serious (rarely fatal) bleeding from the stomach or intestines . This effect can occur without warning at any time while taking this drug. Older adults may be at higher risk for this effect. Stop taking ibuprofen and get medical help right away if you notice any of these rare but serious side effects: black/tarry stools, persistent stomach/ abdominal pain , vomit that looks like coffee grounds, chest/jaw/left arm pain , shortness of breath , unusual sweating , confusion , weakness on one side of the body, slurred speech, sudden vision changes. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the benefits and risks of taking this drug. Quick GuideMigraine or Headache? Migraine Symptoms, Triggers, Treatment USES: Ibuprofen is used to relieve pain from various conditions such as headache , dental pain , menstrual cramps , muscle aches , or arthritis . It is also used to reduce fever and to relieve minor aches and pain due to the common cold or flu . Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by blocking your body's production of certain natural substances that cause inflammation. This effect helps to decrease swel Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen is a painkiller available over the counter without a prescription. It's one of a group of painkillers called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and can be used to: ease mild to moderate pain – such as toothache, migraine and period pain control a high temperature (fever) – for example, when someone has the flu (influenza) ease pain and inflammation (redness and swelling) caused by conditions that affect the joints, bones and muscles – such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis Types of ibuprofen You can buy most types of ibuprofen from supermarkets, general retail outlets or pharmacies. Some types and pack sizes are only available from pharmacy counters, and some only on prescription. Ibuprofen is available in many forms, including: tablets capsules liquids gels or creams sprays In some products ibuprofen is combined with other ingredients. For example, it's sometimes combined with medicine for a blocked nose (a decongestant) and sold as a cold and flu remedy. Who can take ibuprofen Some people should avoid using ibuprofen and others should use it with caution. If you have any queries about using ibuprofen or any other medicines, speak to your GP or pharmacist, or call NHS 111. You shouldn't take ibuprofen if you: have a history of a strong, unpleasant reaction (hypersensitivity) to aspirin or other NSAIDs currently have or recently had a stomach ulcer, or you have had one in the past have severe liver disease are taking low-dose aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular disease You should use ibuprofen with caution if you're aged 65 or over, breastfeeding, or have: kidney or liver problems previously had any bleeding in your stomach narrowing of the arteries (peripheral arterial disease) any problems with your heart, such as angina, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

In the midst of cold and flu season, you may wonder what medications are safe to take without greatly impacting blood glucose levels when you have diabetes. Overall, it's the sickness that increases blood glucose in people with diabetes, not the medication used to treat it. However, some medications should be used with caution. Stacey O'Donnell, R.N., B.S., C.D.E., nurse manager, at Joslin Diabetes Center, goes over different types of medications and how they could impact your diabetes. Examples: Tylenol, Aspirin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Use cautiously if you have renal disease. Anti-inflammatory Examples: Ibuprofen, such as Advil, Motrin, Nuprin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Also should be used carefully if you have renal disease. Examples: Allegra, Bumex Effect on diabetes: Caution should be used in patients who have diabetes with renal disease, cardiac disease and high blood pressure. General guidelines for taking medications for people with diabetes are to avoid products containing sugar, such as sucrose, dextrose, fructose, lactose and honey, O'Donnell says. Also, choose products with little or no alcohol. A suggested list of sugar-free cough and cold medicines includes: Chlor-Trometon tablets Dimetapp Elixir Scot-Tussin DM Liquid Cerose-DM Liquid Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

How To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

There are four types of diabetic neuropathy: peripheral, proximal, autonomic, and focal. Of these, the sensory neuropathies (peripheral and proximal neuropathies) are the most common, affecting our experience of temperature, touch, and pain. Autonomic neuropathy affects nerves involved in involuntary actions in the body such as emptying of the stomach, intestines, and bladder. Motor neuropathy affects the nerves in movement, a condition that is rare in diabetes. Peripheral neuropathy affects the feet and hands and is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. It usually is bilateral, that is, it affects both sides of the body, but it can affect only one side. Diabetic amyotrophy affects the nerves in the thighs and may affect both legs. Charcot joint may occur if the bones in the feet develop fractures and the foot becomes misaligned. Because of neuropathy, you may not feel the pain of the fracture. The foot can then lose muscle support and may eventually become deformed. Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments: Medications When you make a plan with your physician, you will most likely be in the "control pain" mode. Some people have described diabetic neuropathy of the lower extremities as pins and needles and numbness, which can change to the shooting pain of icicles through your feet or legs. As the condition worsens, you may lose your ability to feel pain even when the neurologist pricks you with a pin during his medical examination. As with many complications of diabetes, people with diabetic neuropathy symptoms of less than 6 months duration, which are associated with alterations in glycemic control, have a better prognosis when compared to people with chronic conditions lasting more than 6 months. When I was first diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy, the first drug of cho Continue reading >>

New Fda Warning For Ibuprofen And Naproxen | Diabetic Connect

New Fda Warning For Ibuprofen And Naproxen | Diabetic Connect

Next time you pop open a bottle of Advil there will be a new warning label on it. As of July 2015, the FDA has called for strengthened warning labels for the widely used painkillers ibuprofen and naproxen as well as other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It was previously believed that over-the-counter and prescription NSAIDs might cause an increased risk for heart attack or stroke, but mounting evidence is showing that these drugs do increase those risks, especially if you have a previous heart condition or are at a heightened risk for heart disease. The label on NSAIDs currently reads, NSAIDs may cause an increased risk of serious heart thrombotic [clot] events, including myocardial infarction and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may occur early in treatment and may increase with duration of use. With the new FDA request for stricter labeling, it will now read, NSAIDs cause an increased risk of serious heart thrombotic events, including myocardial infarction and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may occur early in treatment and may increase with duration of use. Although most NSAIDs will be getting this new label, the revised warning does not apply to aspirin, which has actually been shown to lower heart risks for some individuals. The FDA is primarily worried about two groups of people when it comes to the new safety warning: people with existing heart problems or who carry risk factors for heart problems and use NSAIDs on a regular basis, and people with chronic pain problems who use NSAIDs on a regular basis. If you are just a casual user who takes ibuprofen or naproxen for the occasional headache or pain, then you shouldnt have great cause to worry as long as you follow the instructions on the bottle. Common over-the-counter NSAIDs include Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen?

Member PCOS Type2 since 2003 +/- Insulin Since June 2007 so i usually take aspirin but for really bad muscle pain (as opposed to headaches or whatever) i take ibuprofen. I messed up my back again recently so i've been taking 600 mg of ibuprofen... then someone mentioned something to me and i read the inactive ingrediants which include: cellulose, corn starch, hypormellose, lactose, polydextrose, glycol, stodiaum starch glcolate, stearic acie and titanium dioxide. could this be what's f**king w/my blood sugar? 600 mg is a tiny amount of anything. If anyone of those ingredients were ingested at 600mg they would do nothing to your BG. For example, If the only inactive ingredient in aspirin where sugar and it was present at 600mg, it would be like taking 1/8 of a glucose tablet. Insulin (avg): 19.8 U (35% bolus); CHO (avg): 87g; BG (avg): 97 mg/dl; SD: 31 Tests (avg): 5.1; High: 168; Low: 51; highs>140: 3; lows<70: 10 Member PCOS Type2 since 2003 +/- Insulin Since June 2007 and yeah it's 600 mg of ibuprofen, i'm sure it's trace amounts of the rest of the stuff. I take Ibuprofen when I absolutely need to. For me, and I'm told that we all react differently to different medications, Ibuprofen works very well and doesn't up my B/G levels and BP or upset my stomach, thank heaven! Shaun is very knowledgeable and would know more than I would. I agree with what he shared with us. Aspirin doesn't work for me, nor do any of the other substitutes unless they're prescriptive and I'm on enough prescriptive stuff for my diabetes and high blood pressure now. I'm thinking of opening a pharmacy... :-( Take good care and give the Ibuprofen a try... and maybe take an extra B/G level test or two when you first start taking the Ibuprophen as well... just to see what happens with your particula Continue reading >>

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

What Should People With Diabetes Consider When Selecting Pain Medication?

What Should People With Diabetes Consider When Selecting Pain Medication?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

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