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Ibuprofen And Blood Sugar

Go Easy On The Advil, Motrin, Ibuprofen Etc.

Go Easy On The Advil, Motrin, Ibuprofen Etc.

Another study has added to the evidence we already have that suggests that nonsteroidal antinflamatories, the "non-aspirin pain killers" you buy over the counter at the pharmacy are bad for you. The latest study, published in the journal Neurology was hoping to prove that taking these drugs would lower the incidence of dementia. Instead it found the opposite. Here's the study: Risk of dementia and AD with prior exposure to NSAIDs in an elderly community-based cohort. J. C.S. Breitner et al. Neurology 2009, doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181a18691) The researchers "followed 2,736 dementia-free enrollees with extensive prior pharmacy data, following them biennially for up to 12 years to identify dementia and AD." What they found was: Contrary to the hypothesis that NSAIDs protect against AD, pharmacy-defined heavy NSAID users showed increased incidence of dementia and AD, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.66 (95% confidence interval, 1.24–2.24) and 1.57 (95% confidence interval, 1.10–2.23) This did not surprise me at all, for reasons that were not cited in any discussions of this study. Many people do not realize heavy use of NSAIDs has been linked to high blood pressure and that there appears to be a lifetime dose that dramatically raises the risk of developing end stage kidney disease. I have written about this with appropriate journal citations HERE. One of the studies cited on that page, published in Archives of Internal Medicine , concluded: [Men] who took acetaminophen six or seven days a week had a 34% higher risk of hypertension. Those who took NSAIDs six or seven days a week had a 38% higher risk and those who took aspirin six or seven days a week had a 26% higher risk. High blood pressure is a known cause of vascular dementia, and the older and more fragile people ar Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen Side Effects

Ibuprofen Side Effects

What Is Ibuprofen (Advil)? Ibuprofen, sold under the brand names Advil, Motrin, and Ibuprin, is a medication used to relieve pain, swelling and inflammation. Motrin and Advil can be purchased over-the-counter in 200 milligram (mg) tablets, while higher doses require a prescription. Available in tablets and capsules, ibuprofen is also found in combination with other drugs sold over-the-counter (OTC) for cough, cold, and migraine. In certain situations, ibuprofen may be given in hospitals in liquid form through the veins, or intravenously (IV). Ibuprofen belongs to group of drugs known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, which work by inhibiting prostaglandins, chemicals that can cause inflammation in the body. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) originally approved ibuprofen under the Motrin brand in 1974. It was manufactured by McNeil. Ibuprofen versus Tylenol (Acetaminophen) Tylenol (acetaminophen) provides pain relief but, unlike NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, it has no effect on inflammation. This is because Tylenol works differently than ibuprofen and NSAIDs. To date, the way Tylenol works is not fully clear, but it's thought to reduce pain by acting on pain receptors in the brain. Unlike ibuprofen, Tylenol has no activity in the stomach and does not cause problems with stomach pain or acid reflux. And like most NSAIDs including ibuprofen, Tylenol reduces fever. Ibuprofen versus Aleve (Naproxen) Ibuprofen and Aleve (naproxen) are similar in that they contain the same basic chemical building block. In addition, they are both available over-the-counter in low doses and via prescription in higher doses. However, the effects of ibuprofen do not tend to last as long as Aleve, so you may have to take it every four to six hours (up to six times a day). Aleve Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen And Blood Sugar

Ibuprofen And Blood Sugar

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does anyone know if anti-inflammatories have a side effect of reducing blood sugar levels? I have been taking Ibuprofen for a couple of weeks for a painful tooth, and have noticed that my fasting blood sugar levels are down considerable, and consistently. Is this coincidence? Or is there another explanation? Welcome to the forums. Yes it is possible for NSAID's to lower a1c levels in T2's. Here's a reference study................. Welcome to the forums. Yes it is possible for NSAID's to lower a1c levels in T2's. Here's a reference study................. Welcome to the forums. Yes it is possible for NSAID's to lower a1c levels in T2's. Here's a reference study................. Thank you so much, Urbanracer. I wonder if we should all start taking small doses of anti-inflammatories?! tina_marie Don't have diabetes Well-Known Member My husband is taking them and since he started on them his readings have been low . This morning he was 4.8 and yesterday morning he was 4.5. Thank you, all of you. I understand that anti-inflammatories do indeed reduce blood sugar levels. It is thought that high BS could be caused by inflammation, so logically anti-inflammatories woud be the right treatment. But, as you have warned, these could have a bad effect on the kidneys. I am so disappointed - thought I had stumbled upon a cure of Type ! Where do we go from here? Is there any research going on? Any trials? Continue reading >>

Acetaminophen Can Affect Meter And Cgm Readings

Acetaminophen Can Affect Meter And Cgm Readings

The common pain-relief drug does not affect actual glucose concentration in the bloodstream, however. There’s been evidence as far back as 2009 that acetaminophen can cause inaccurate blood sugar readings with meters. Now, a more recent study suggests that the common pain reliever also might interfere with continuous glucose monitor (CGM) readings, as well. In July 2009, The Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology published a paper discussing sources of meter errors in measurement of blood glucose levels, including patient use of acetaminophen. Acetaminophen is a mild painkiller and fever reducer that people use as an alternative to aspirin; although it’s been hard for scientists to pin down exactly how acetaminophen works, the drug is believed to moderate the body’s production of prostaglandins, a hormone-like lipid which, among other things, helps regulate sensitivity to pain. Researchers in the 2009 study documented how acetaminophen use seemed to cause errors in blood glucose readings with meters. The paper has found no chemical or metabolic link between acetaminophen and the body’s production of, or sensitivity to, glucose or insulin. The researchers did say older meters were more prone to these erroneous readings than newer meters, but that such fluctuations can be possible with all meters they researched. Now, a similar inaccuracy has been documented in connection with CGM use. In 2015, clinical investigators published a paper in Diabetes Care describing meter and monitor variations for a group of acetaminophen-using patients who tested both with meters and CGMs. The study, led by Dr. David M. Maahs of the University of Colorado Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, was a stress test to predict the reliability of investigational closed-loop arti Continue reading >>

Will You Have Low Blood Sugar With Ibuprofen - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Low Blood Sugar With Ibuprofen - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 60 year old woman who takes Dabigatran NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Choosing A Pain Reliever

Choosing A Pain Reliever

Choosing Wisely is an initiative by the ABIM Foundation to identify commonly-used tests or procedures whose necessity should be questioned and discussed. This information was developed by Consumer Reports in cooperation with the American Society of Nephrology. If you need a painkiller but suffer from high blood pressure, heart failure, or kidney disease, it’s best to steer clear of some commonly used pain relievers. Those include: Ibuprofen, which is sold under the brand names Advil and Motrin, and also as a generic or store brand. You can buy it without a prescription at the drug store. It’s sometimes combined with other drugs in other over-the-counter products, such as certain cold remedies. Naproxen, sold under the brand name Aleve and as a generic or store brand. It doesn’t need a prescription, either. Celecoxib, a prescription drug sold as Celebrex. All three of those drugs, which are called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, can ease pain and inflammation. But they are too risky if you have any of those health problems. Here’s why. They’re bad for high blood pressure. All NSAIDs can cause or worsen high blood pressure. That increases your chance of having a heart attack or stroke. The drugs can also make some blood pressure drugs less effective. That includes diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril and generic), ACE inhibitors such as lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril, and generic) and ARBs such as losartan (Cozaar and generic). They’re bad for the heart and kidneys. Long-term use of NSAIDs can make your body hold onto fluid, which can worsen heart failure symptoms, such as shortness of breath, swollen ankles, and a rapid or irregular heartbeat. They can also reduce kidney function. That makes the drugs risky for people who already Continue reading >>

I Am A Diabetic And I Would Like To Know If Taking Ibuprofen Will Raise My Sugar Levels?

I Am A Diabetic And I Would Like To Know If Taking Ibuprofen Will Raise My Sugar Levels?

Home Q & A Questions I am a diabetic and I would... I am a diabetic and I would like to know if taking ibuprofen will raise my sugar levels? osteoarthritis , pain , ibuprofen , surgery , diabetic , knee The reason I am asking is because I had knee surgery about a month ago, and I have been taking 400 mgs 3 times a day and my sugar levels have become alot higher than is normal for me. My sugar was always under control before I started taking it. According to the list of known side effects of ibuprofen ... it can cause hypoglycemia. But in your condition since the hyperglycemic episodes have started after you started taking ibuprofen (and that is the only change in your medication, diet, etc.), then it could most likely be the cause of your high blood glucose levels. Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question . The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices. Subscribe to receive email notifications whenever new articles are published. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex (updated Feb 28th, 2018), Cerner Multum (updated Mar 1st, 2018), Wolters Kluwer (updated Mar 1st, 2018) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy . Continue reading >>

How Pain Relievers Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

How Pain Relievers Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Many of us don’t even think about our blood sugar levels when we’re scrabbling through the medicine cabinet, looking for a pain reliever. We just want to make the pain disappear—stat. But people with diabetes do need to take that matter into consideration when they’re taking any medication. If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor or diabetes educator has probably warned you to be vigilant about the effects that that your diet, your activity level, and any other medication you take on a regular basis can have on your blood sugar levels. You also need to be careful about any pain relieving medication that you take, even if it’s just on an occasional basis, because certain types of pain killers can lower or raise your blood sugar levels. NSAIDs There are times when you can easily treat pain with an over-the counter pain reliever. You may take a low dose of aspirin or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) like ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve the occasional headache or muscle pain. A regular dose is unlikely to affect your blood sugar levels, but a higher-than-usual dose may lower your blood sugar level. Talk to your doctor about what’s an appropriate dose for your occasional aches and pains so you don’t accidentally cause an episode of hypoglycemia. Another word of caution. You might have settled on an effective dose of a particular pain reliever that won’t drastically alter your blood sugar levels. But your diabetes puts you at elevated risk for certain other health conditions. So you may have other medical conditions you need to manage—and you will need to watch out for the effect any pain killers you take can have on those. For example, NSAIDS like ibuprofen and naproxen can increase your blood pressure. And they can affect your kidneys, too, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

In the midst of cold and flu season, you may wonder what medications are safe to take without greatly impacting blood glucose levels when you have diabetes. Overall, it's the sickness that increases blood glucose in people with diabetes, not the medication used to treat it. However, some medications should be used with caution. Stacey O'Donnell, R.N., B.S., C.D.E., nurse manager, at Joslin Diabetes Center, goes over different types of medications and how they could impact your diabetes. Examples: Tylenol, Aspirin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Use cautiously if you have renal disease. Anti-inflammatory Examples: Ibuprofen, such as Advil, Motrin, Nuprin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Also should be used carefully if you have renal disease. Examples: Allegra, Bumex Effect on diabetes: Caution should be used in patients who have diabetes with renal disease, cardiac disease and high blood pressure. General guidelines for taking medications for people with diabetes are to avoid products containing sugar, such as sucrose, dextrose, fructose, lactose and honey, O'Donnell says. Also, choose products with little or no alcohol. A suggested list of sugar-free cough and cold medicines includes: Chlor-Trometon tablets Dimetapp Elixir Scot-Tussin DM Liquid Cerose-DM Liquid Continue reading >>

Will You Have High Blood Sugar With Ibuprofen - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have High Blood Sugar With Ibuprofen - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 38 year old woman who takes Zanaflex NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen?

Member PCOS Type2 since 2003 +/- Insulin Since June 2007 so i usually take aspirin but for really bad muscle pain (as opposed to headaches or whatever) i take ibuprofen. I messed up my back again recently so i've been taking 600 mg of ibuprofen... then someone mentioned something to me and i read the inactive ingrediants which include: cellulose, corn starch, hypormellose, lactose, polydextrose, glycol, stodiaum starch glcolate, stearic acie and titanium dioxide. could this be what's f**king w/my blood sugar? 600 mg is a tiny amount of anything. If anyone of those ingredients were ingested at 600mg they would do nothing to your BG. For example, If the only inactive ingredient in aspirin where sugar and it was present at 600mg, it would be like taking 1/8 of a glucose tablet. Insulin (avg): 19.8 U (35% bolus); CHO (avg): 87g; BG (avg): 97 mg/dl; SD: 31 Tests (avg): 5.1; High: 168; Low: 51; highs>140: 3; lows<70: 10 Member PCOS Type2 since 2003 +/- Insulin Since June 2007 and yeah it's 600 mg of ibuprofen, i'm sure it's trace amounts of the rest of the stuff. I take Ibuprofen when I absolutely need to. For me, and I'm told that we all react differently to different medications, Ibuprofen works very well and doesn't up my B/G levels and BP or upset my stomach, thank heaven! Shaun is very knowledgeable and would know more than I would. I agree with what he shared with us. Aspirin doesn't work for me, nor do any of the other substitutes unless they're prescriptive and I'm on enough prescriptive stuff for my diabetes and high blood pressure now. I'm thinking of opening a pharmacy... :-( Take good care and give the Ibuprofen a try... and maybe take an extra B/G level test or two when you first start taking the Ibuprophen as well... just to see what happens with your particula Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Effects Of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs In Conventional Dosage On Glucose Homeostasis In Patients With Diabetes.

Effects Of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs In Conventional Dosage On Glucose Homeostasis In Patients With Diabetes.

Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in conventional dosage on glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes. Larger-than-conventional doses of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)are known to lower plasma glucose levels. This phenomenon has raised thequestions whether or not NSAIDs in conventional dosage can be used for thetreatment of hyperglycemia in patients who have non-insulin-dependent diabetesmellitus and whether or not NSAIDs added to preexistent hypoglycemic drug therapytaken orally may lead to unanticipated hypoglycemia. In this study we evaluatedaspirin, sodium salicylate and ibuprofen given in conventional dosage tohyperglycemic patients with adult-onset (type II) diabetes. Half the patientswere usually treated for hyperglycemia by means of diet only and half with dietplus hypoglycemic drugs given orally. Significant changes in plasma glucoselevels were not seen after the administration of a combination drug containingaspirin and magnesium-aluminum hydroxide (Ascriptin, 650 mg three times a day;glucose change = 236+/-30 to 236+/-31 mg per dl) or sodium salicylate (600 mgthree times a day; glucose change=284+/-76 to 273+/-84 mg per dl). Astatistically significant but small change was seen with the administration ofibuprofen (600 mg three times a day; glucose change=196+/-60 to 179+/-47 mg perdl) but not when giving ibuprofen (300 mg three times a day; glucosechange=267+/-78 to 282+/-60 mg per dl). The results of this study indicate thatconventional doses of NSAIDs should not be used for treating hyperglycemia andthat, since the additive hypoglycemic effect of NSAIDs in conventional doses was minimal or negligible, they can be used safely for other purposes in diabeticpatients taking hypoglycemic drugs orally. Continue reading >>

Other Dangerous Drugs For People With Diabetes

Other Dangerous Drugs For People With Diabetes

A major problem with all drugs is that busy doctors often ignore potentially damaging drug side effects. Often they aren't even aware that these side effects are listed in the drug's official FDA-required label (called the "Prescribing Information" online.). That is because most doctors get their information about drugs from reps sent out by pharmaceutical companies or doctors who are well-compensated by these companies to promote the latest, most expensive drugs to their peers. Unfortunately, all the major drug companies have a long record of suppressing information about damaging side effects of all their drugs. Periodically, one of these drugs will kill or injure enough people that it comes to the attention of the FDA and the media. Even then, the FDA will usually only post an "alert" and will allow the drug to continue to be sold. Busy doctors apparently don't read these alerts, as they continue to prescribe drugs that have generated serious alerts in quantities that result in billions of dollars of drug company revenue each year. Proof that doctors are woefully ignorant of the side effects of even the most heavily prescribed drugs was provided by this study: Physician Response to Patient Reports of Adverse Drug Effects: Implications For Patient-Targeted Adverse Effect Surveillance.Golomb, Beatrice A, et al. Drug Safety. 30(8):669-675, 2007. TIt was a study of a group of patients prescribed a statin drug that verified that doctors ignore patients' reports of even the most significant side effects. As reported, it found that Eighty-seven percent of patients reportedly spoke to their physician about the possible connection between statin use and their symptom....Physicians were reportedly more likely to deny than affirm the possibility of a connection. Rejection of a Continue reading >>

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