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I Have Type 2 Diabetes Now What

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

I just wrote an answer to this question about 5 minutes ago and will answer it again because it is so very important for you and for millions of other people. The answer to your question is yes. From my personal experience Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed. In March of 2017 I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. It really scared me. My father was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at 60 and I watched him have to inject insulin 2 times a day. His body still deteriorated due to the diabetes. I did not want to end up like that. I was a chocoholic and ate huge portions. I was too heavy for my height and did not get enough exercise. I immediately got on the internet and started researching for cures for Type II Diabetes. I read all the information at the American Diabetes Association website and was thoroughly depressed. I was being told that I had a progressive disease with no cure that would last the rest of my life and finally cause my death. I learned that I would have to take progressively stronger medications to control my diabetes and BG, (Blood glucose levels). I decided that this path was not for me. I knew there had to be a cure for this terrible disease even if all these doctors and pharmaceutical companies were saying that there is no cure. I read everything I could find on T2 Diabetes. Causes, treatments, reversal and cure. I decided that changing my diet drastically to a low carb high fat diet, LCHF, was the way to go. I found a great deal of good information at Diet Doctor - Making low carb simple. So I did it. I absolutely changed my diet completely from that day. It was very difficult. My body was craving carbohydrates, especially sweets. I had physical flu symptoms from the body adjusting to this new diet. I used meditation and mindful eating to get through those Continue reading >>

Would You Eat Food That Was Genetically Modified?

Would You Eat Food That Was Genetically Modified?

Not only do I eat GMOs, I willingly inject myself with GMOs 5–8 times a day! It is my secret to a long life. “What?” I can hear your gasping disbelief from here. “Why would you do something so harmful to yourself? Don't you realize how BAD GMOS are?” I have Type 1 diabetes. For those of you who don't know, it is an autoimmune disease that causes the islet cells of the pancreas (they are responsible for producing insulin) to die off. When your body cannot produce its own insulin, you must inject man made insulin several times a day. If you don't, your blood glucose levels will rise to dangerous levels and your blood chemistry goes wonky (scientific medical term). Without insulin, your blood begins burning fat and muscle for fuel instead of carbs. The acidic byproduct is called ketones. You may have heard of low-carb diets that suggest you check your urine for ketones and applaud you if you manage to get a pink square on the ketone strip. However, with Type 1, that pink square is terrifying. It means you are going into ketoacidosis, which is a life threatening emergency. Without treatment, you will die. Quickly. If you have Type 1 diabetes (only loosely related to Type 2 diabetes, which is what most people recognize as diabetes) you must be on insulin. No matter how healthy your diet. No matter how few carbs you eat. No matter how thin and fit you are. You must be on insulin. Commercially produced insulin used to be made from cows and pigs. Now it is created in a lab, by genetically modifying yeast spores. Lab created insulin is the perfect example of a genetically modified organism. Without GMOS, I would be dead within a week or two. Yes, I allow GMOS into my body. Gladly. Continue reading >>

5 Signals That You Might Have Type 2 Diabetes

5 Signals That You Might Have Type 2 Diabetes

Some people have an issue with getting older, but this is the wrong mindset to have. You really should consider yourself lucky. There are a lot of perks that come with age, but there are also a few things you’re going to want to keep in mind. One of the most important being your health. Type 2 diabetes has become an epidemic of sorts in this country, and it’s something we talk about frequently on our blog. The risk for everyone changes as they get older, as well as the best method of treatment. Factors such as being overweight or having high blood pressure only compound that risk. Even in a society where we have access to a gargantuan amount of information just a few clicks away, people still chose to live in the dark on some health issues. This is not helped by the fact that most of the symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes can be ignored or simply mistaken for some minor issue that’ll go away on its own. (If you’d like to help us in our search for better diabetes related care, please consider enrolling in our clinical trial here.) If you’re still reading this post, it means you’re interested maintaining your health and that’s a great thing! The following are all indications which have been associated with type 2 diabetes. Now, we don’t want to freak you out because experiencing one of these symptoms doesn’t automatically mean you have diabetes, but you should consider getting tested if your older than 45. 1) Frequent Urination An excess buildup of glucose in the bloodstream makes the kidneys flush the excess out via urine. Frequent urination is one of the classic red flags for type 2 diabetes. People who notice they are visiting the restroom way more than they used to should consider talking to their doctor about it. Diabetes can cause you to: Fee Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.[6] Common symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, and unexplained weight loss.[3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon.[4][5] Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise.[1] Some people are more genetically at risk than others.[6] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes, with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes.[1] In diabetes mellitus type 1 there is a lower total level of insulin to control blood glucose, due to an autoimmune induced loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[12][13] Diagnosis of diabetes is by blood tests such as fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, or glycated hemoglobin (A1C).[3] Type 2 diabetes is partly preventable by staying a normal weight, exercising regularly, and eating properly.[1] Treatment involves exercise and dietary changes.[1] If blood sugar levels are not adequately lowered, the medication metformin is typically recommended.[7][14] Many people may eventually also require insulin injections.[9] In those on insulin, routinely checking blood sugar levels is advised; however, this may not be needed in those taking pills.[15] Bariatri Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With Diabetes? Here's Help

Just Diagnosed With Diabetes? Here's Help

Hearing the words you have diabetes scares some, upsets others, and overwhelms most. Yes, it's serious, and yes, you'll need to make some adjustments. But diabetes is a disease you can control, says Kim DeCoste, RN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. "An important first step for the newly diagnosed is to realize that you can be a healthy person living with diabetes. A few lifestyle changes can help you manage your blood sugar and feel better day to day. You can lead a very normal, healthy life." Here, six expert-recommended tips to help set you on a path for success: 1. Ignore the horror stories. Tell people you have diabetes and inevitably you hear about so-and-so's great aunt who had her leg amputated or the friend of a friend who almost went blind. True, these are real complications, but our knowledge about preventing them is so much better today, says Robert Henry, MD, president of medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association. Get your information from a reliable source: A good primary care physician or certified diabetes educator will help you best understand the disease, without overloading you with too much at once. You can also do some research on your own—visit the ADA at diabetes.org, or call (800) DIABETES. 2. Walk a little more. It's an easy way to boost physical activity, which lowers blood sugar for two reasons: Research shows that your body uses insulin more efficiently when you exercise, and working out helps you lose weight. Start with the old standards, says Henry: Take the stairs instead of the elevator, park in the farthest spot in the lot, get off the bus a stop early. Eventually work up to 30 minutes 5 days a week. For people with type 2, establishing a regular fitness routine may reduce or even e Continue reading >>

8 Facts About Diabetes That Can Save Your Life

8 Facts About Diabetes That Can Save Your Life

En español l Actress S. Epatha Merkerson still remembers the moment a doctor took her aside and said he needed to talk to her. Merkerson, best known as Lt. Anita Van Buren on Law & Order, had volunteered at a health event in Washington and, with cameras rolling, had agreed to be tested for type 2 diabetes — a way to encourage people at risk to see their doctors. When the doctor pulled her aside, "I thought he wanted to get a photo with me or an autograph," Merkerson says with a laugh. "In fact, he told me that my blood sugar levels were way too high. I went to my doctor and discovered that I had type 2 diabetes." In retrospect, she admits, she shouldn't have been surprised. "My dad died of complications of diabetes. My grandmother went blind because of diabetes. I had an uncle with amputations." Like many, she'd ignored some classic warning signs — excessive thirst and frequent urination. Twelve years later, the Emmy Award-winning actress has joined forces with drugmaker Merck in an initiative called America's Diabetes Challenge, to spread the word about prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. "What I've learned is that this is a manageable disease," Merkerson says. It's also a preventable one. Yet type 2 diabetes continues to exact a terrible toll. Untreated, diabetes can damage the retina, causing blindness, and destroy the kidneys. Over time, abnormally high blood sugar levels can reduce circulation to the limbs, ultimately necessitating amputations. Recent research links type 2 diabetes to a higher risk of dementia. People with diabetes are also up to four times more likely to develop heart disease. Fortunately, there's plenty you can do to prevent or delay the disease. Here's what you need to know. 1. Genes determine some — but not all — of your risk Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes; Now What? – Guidelines For Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

I Have Diabetes; Now What? – Guidelines For Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

There was a time when it was considered not unusual to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at fifty. The poor lifestyle choices, processed diet and nearly thirty years of work-life stress were expected to impact us by that age. These days, people are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at forty and with every passing year, the bar is lowered further, with the millennials now being diagnosed in their thirties and even their twenties! While a Diabetes Type 2 diagnosis can be overwhelming, it’s important to know that you aren’t alone. Try to think of this diagnosis as the first step towards learning how to control your blood sugar levels and take charge of your life. Our guidelines for newly diagnosed diabetics will help you navigate your way through all the lifestyle and diet changes you need to make, gain a better understanding of your disease, educate yourself on how to manage it, and how to find the right support you need. I Have Diabetes, Now What ? A new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is sure to take you on an emotional roller coaster ride. It is completely natural to feel low after your diagnosis. Emotions run amok as you face the reality of future complications like heart disease, kidney failure and vision related problems, all while you grieve for lost health. Diabetes can be a tough condition to accept, so feelings of anger, shock, resentment, betrayal, shame and denial are completely normal. Studies show that it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed diabetics to go through a period of depression. But you can learn to deal with the emotions that come up with a diabetes diagnosis. We are not going to lie to you; you will need to commit to making changes so you can live a better life with diabetes, and that requires work. Since your body is no longer able to respond Continue reading >>

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

In the last article we discussed the complex relationship between body weight and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We learned that although obesity is strongly associated with T2DM, a subset of “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO) people have normal blood sugar and insulin sensitivity and don’t ever develop diabetes. In this article we’re going to talk about the mirror reflection of the MHO: the “metabolically unhealthy nonobese” (MUN). These are lean people with either full-fledged type 2 diabetes or some metabolic dysfunction, such as insulin resistance. You might even be surprised to learn that skinny people can and do get T2DM. They are rarely mentioned in the media, and there isn’t much written about them in the scientific literature. Perhaps these folks have been overlooked because type 2 diabetes has been historically viewed as a disease of gluttony and sloth, a self-inflicted outcome of eating too much and not and not exercising enough. But the very existence of the MUN phenotype proves that there’s more to T2DM than overeating and a sedentary lifestyle. Remember that one in three type 2 diabetics are undiagnosed. It’s possible that a significant number of these people that are lean. They don’t suspect they might have T2DM because they’re under the impression that it’s not a condition that affects thin people. This is one of the biggest dangers of the myth that “only fat people get diabetes”. It’s well-known that high blood sugar can precede the development of T2DM for as long as ten years. It is during this time that many of the complications associated with diabetes – nerve damage, retinal changes, and early signs of kidney deterioration – begin to develop. This is why it’s just as important for lean people to maintain healthy blood s Continue reading >>

Tom Hanks On What Led To Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: 'i Was A Total Idiot'

Tom Hanks On What Led To Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: 'i Was A Total Idiot'

He's funny, charming and talented, but Tom Hanks is also "a total idiot" — according to the star himself. That's because, despite being clever in many ways, he ignored medical advice and chose to live a lifestyle that he now believes led to his type 2 diabetes diagnosis. We apologize, this video has expired. Radio Times. “I was heavy. You've seen me in movies, you know what I looked like," he continued. "I was a total idiot." Back in 2013, Hanks first revealed his ailment, telling then-"Late Show" host David Letterman, "I went to the doctor, and he said, 'You know those high blood sugar numbers you've been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you've graduated! You've got type 2 diabetes, young man,'" It seems the 59-year-old's previous attempts to bring those elevated blood sugar numbers down by dieting just weren't working. "I thought I could avoid it by removing the buns from my cheeseburgers," he told RadioTimes. "Well, it takes a little bit more than that." But it's not too late to turn things around. "My doctor says if I can hit a target weight, I will not have type 2 diabetes anymore," he adeed. But in 2013, he explained to Letterman that his teen-like target weight was one he might not be able to hit. "Well, I'm going to have type 2 diabetes then, because there is no way I can weigh [what I weighed] in high school," he said with a laugh. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

5 Tips: Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

5 Tips: Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

You’ve worked hard for your life. Children have left home. Now it’s your time. Time to be footloose and fancy free. You’ve gained a bit of weight over the years. Things ache more than they used to. Energy, what’s that? Whenever you go to the doctor you’re given warnings about what could go wrong, but you’ve got time, it isn’t urgent. Or, is it? Finally the shoe drops. You visit the doctor and it’s no longer a warning–you are actually sick. You are sent off with a diet sheet and a prescription. Shell-shocked would be the best way to describe how you are feeling at the moment. This wasn’t how it was supposed to be. You knew you were getting older but you still thought you were invincible. This kind of thing happens to other people not to you. You don’t even want to talk to your friends about it. They might think you brought it on yourself. This isn’t what you had planned for your future. This is something that 100,000’s of people around the world experience everyday. This disease claims a life every 7 seconds. It doesn’t have to be this way. Have you just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes? Here are 5 things to do right now: 1. Don’t be Fooled As shocking as it is to be told you’re diabetic–it can often feel like nothing has changed. Most people still feel well and have no outward signs that they are diabetic. The fact that Type 2 diabetes is common can also mean it’s not taken as seriously as it should be. The doctors and nurses can sometimes be blasé about the diagnosis. They give out a prescription and a diet sheet and tell people to come back in 12 months. All of this can mean it’s seen as a mild condition and that the medication means people can carry on as normal. Don’t be fooled. Diabetes is a serious disease and means that Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Adult onset diabetes was a fair description of type 2 diabetes, up until two decades ago, but no longer. In the United States, increasing numbers of adolescents are now diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, most of whom are obese. Furthermore, type 2 diabetes is also diagnosed more frequently in young adults who are in their 20s and 30s, as compared to a decade or two ago. We know that healthier eating and daily exercise and activity can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, in adult people who are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Most people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes still have normal or elevated levels of insulin. However, they can no longer produce enough insulin to overcome their body’s resistance to insulin action. Insulin resistance is commonly observed in obesity and is exacerbated by inactivity. There is also a genetic component to it, such that African Americans are usually more insulin resistant than Caucasians of equal size. Unlike type 1 diabetes, patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have a relative deficiency of insulin. If the child is sick at the time of diagnosis and/or has very high blood sugar levels associated with marked symptoms such as weight loss, or excessive urination, insulin therapy will be started first. Another reason to start insulin in such instance is that not every child who is overweight or obese necessarily has type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the doctors may need to run some tests to verify that the child does not have type 1 diabetes. For a child or adolescent who is not sick and has few symptoms of diabetes, diet and exercise may be the first choice. However, if the symptoms are more pronounced, or if diet and exercise alone fail, treatment with oral drugs that either enhance insulin secretion (sulfonylureas, for Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

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