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I Have Type 2 Diabetes Now What

6 Signs Your Type 2 Diabetes Might Really Be Type 1

6 Signs Your Type 2 Diabetes Might Really Be Type 1

Reviewed by endocrinologist Stanley S. Schwartz, MD, emeritus Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, Chairman of the Grunberger Diabetes Institute, Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine and Molecular Medicine & Genetics at Wayne State University School of Medicine and President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Up to 10%1 of people with type 2 diabetes may actually have a form of diabetes known as latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, or LADA, where the immune system slowly destroys insulin-producing beta cells. That’s the conclusion of a string of studies that have looked at this mysterious high blood sugar problem since it was first recognized by Scottish endocrinologists in the late 1970s.2 Yet 39 years later, most of the estimated 3 million or more Americans with LADA think they’ve got type 2 diabetes. That misdiagnosis can cause frustration, misunderstandings and even health problems, says endocrinologist Stanley S. Schwartz, MD, an emeritus Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “If your doctor is not thinking about the possibility of LADA, he or she may not prescribe the diabetes drugs early on that could help extend the life of your insulin-producing beta cells,” Dr. Schwartz says. “With LADA, you lose the ability to produce insulin much more quickly than the typical type 2. But a doctor who believes you’re a type 2 may hesitate to prescribe insulin when your blood sugar levels rise, thinking that a healthier lifestyle and higher doses of other medications will work.” As a result, your blood sugar could skyrocket, increasing your risk for diabetes complications, says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, Chairman of the Grunberger Di Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 2

Diabetes - Type 2

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 2 diabetes; Maturity onset diabetes; Noninsulin-dependent diabetes Highlights Diabetes Statistics According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Diabetes Fact Sheet, nearly 26 million American adults and children have diabetes. About 79 million Americans aged 20 years and older have pre-diabetes, a condition that increases the risk for developing diabetes. Diabetes and Cancer Type 2 diabetes increases the risk for certain types of cancer, according to a consensus report from the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society. Diabetes doubles the risk for developing liver, pancreatic, or endometrial cancer. Certain medications used for treating type 2 diabetes may possibly increase the risk for some types of cancers. Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The American Diabetes Association recommends that pregnant women without known risk factors for diabetes get screened for gestational diabetes at 24 - 28 weeks of pregnancy. Pregnant women with risk factors for diabetes should be screened for type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit. Aspirin for Heart Disease Prevention The American Diabetes Association now recommends daily low-dose (75 - 162 mg) aspirin for men older than age 50 and women older than age 60 who have diabetes and at least one additional heart disease risk factor (such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, family history, or albuminuria). Guidelines for Treatment of Diabetic Neuropathy The anticonvulsant drug pregabalin (Lyrica) is a first-line treatment for painful diabetic neuropathy, according to recent guidelines released by the American Academy of Neurol Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

If your child or someone you know has been recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you may be wondering how the disease differs from type 2 diabetes — the form people tend to know more about. What causes type 1 versus type 2 diabetes? Are the symptoms the same? And how is each treated? Here to clear up the confusion with an overview of key differences — and similarities — between these two types of diabetes are experts Julie Settles, M.S.N., A.C.N.P.-B.C., C.E.N., a clinical research scientist at Lilly Diabetes, and Rosemary Briars, N.D., P.N.P.-B.C., C.D.E., C.C.D.C., clinical director and program co-director of the Chicago Children’s Diabetes Center at La Rabida Children’s Hospital. Causes Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, as it’s formally known in medical terms, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person develops high blood glucose (blood sugar). The underlying health factors causing the high blood sugar will determine whether someone is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which “the body’s immune system starts to make antibodies that are targeted directly at the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (islet cells),” explains Briars. Over time, the immune system “gradually destroys the islet cells, so insulin is no longer made and the person has to take insulin every day, from then on,” she says. As for why this happens, Settles notes, “The immune system normally fights off viruses and bacteria that we do not want in our body, but when it causes diabetes, it is because something has gone wrong and now the body attacks its own cells.” Triggering this autoimmune response is a complex mix of genetic and environmental factors that researchers are still trying to fully understand. O Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Until recently, the common type of diabetes in children and teens was type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose,or sugar, get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much sugar stays in the blood. Now younger people are also getting type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But now it is becoming more common in children and teens, due to more obesity. With Type 2 diabetes, the body does not make or use insulin well. Children have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if they are overweight or have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or are not active. Children who are African American, Hispanic, Native American/Alaska Native, Asian American, or Pacific Islander also have a higher risk. To lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in children Have them maintain a healthy weight Be sure they are physically active Have them eat smaller portions of healthy foods Limit time with the TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes may be controlled with diet and exercise. If not, patients will need to take oral diabetes medicines or insulin. A blood test called the A1C can check on how you are managing your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes – What Do I Do Now?

Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes – What Do I Do Now?

You are newly diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and you are getting so much information on how you need to change your lifestyle to a diabetes-friendly lifestyle that you are feeling overwhelmed. I figured I would touch on the topic of newly diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes for those asking – “what do I do now?” Type 2 Diabetes is one of the most insidious diseases because the patient may not be feeling that sick. Because of this, Type 2 Diabetes has one of the highest denial rates of any disease. It is really important that you take your newly diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes very seriously because this disease affects your long term health. Fear is normal It is very normal to be scared, sad or angry when you are newly diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. The key is to make yourself deal with this situation. Putting off the inevitable is only going to hurt your long term health. The faster you convince yourself of the need to change your lifestyle to a diabetes friendly lifestyle the better off you will be. Also you don’t want your sex life to change. First Step – Educate Yourself If you are anything like me, the more you know about something the easier it is to deal with. Read, read and read some more. There are countless books on the subject of Type 2 Diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends a book called Diabetes A to Z which, by the name you can tell, provides everything you would need to know about Diabetes. If you are not the book reading type (hey not everyone likes to read) you can certainly find a plethora of information on the web. There is the trusty American Diabetes Association website which goes into detail the cause and effect of Type 2 Diabetes. WebMD also has a complete overview of Diabetes that is definitely helpful if you have questions about the d Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Handle The News

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Handle The News

"You have type 2 diabetes.” It’s a tough diagnosis to hear. Once you're told, what should you do? First, take a breath. You may be surprised or even shocked, especially if your body feels the same as it always has. Some people feel scared, sad, or overwhelmed. “When I was diagnosed, it hit me like a blow to my stomach. I couldn’t believe it,” says 65-year-old Luxmi Popat, from Orlando, FL. But after you have time to think, remember this: You can live a long, healthy life with diabetes. You may need to make changes to your daily routine, but it doesn’t have to stop you from doing the things you want and need to do. “Diabetes can be controlled,” says Gregory Dodell, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System in New York. “In addition to finding ways to live a healthier life, we have amazing tools that can help avoid complications.” Get to the right mind-set with these first steps: A shift in your thinking may help you feel better and move forward. “Think of managing diabetes and improving your overall health as a tremendous challenge with a huge upside,” Dodell says. Maybe you haven’t been eating well or getting enough exercise. Maybe you need more of a work-life balance. Your diagnosis can be a wake-up call -- in a good way. “We often take our health for granted,” Dodell says. “But in the long run, it’s difficult to accomplish all we do on a daily basis if we’re not healthy.” A change in mind-set worked for Quinn Nystrom, a diabetes advocate in Baxter, MN, who has been living with the condition for 18 years. “When I learned that I was the only one that could determine the quality of my life, it changed how I looked at the world,” Nystrom says. “Diabetes didn't have to define me, I could use it to refine me Continue reading >>

What Are The Best, Cost-effective Anti-aging Techniques?

What Are The Best, Cost-effective Anti-aging Techniques?

Answer Wiki Now you can get the best technique there is to anti aging. You can learn from the link below. 100% effective learn directly from the source. Let me first explain why people age. One of the main causes of aging is weakening communication networks in cells between the genome and the mitochondrion, anorganelle in the cell that works as the powerhouse of our bodies. A mitochondrion is like a digestive system of the cell that draws energy out of the chemical bonds of glucose to produce action-ready molecules called adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP molecules supply cells with chemical energy—similar to what electronic devices get from batteries—and that helps us move, think, and overall keeps our bodies alive. The energy needs of cells, however, fluctuate, and as a result mitochondria have to adjust. For that to happen, a cell’s mitochondria must communicate with the genome, which announce the cell’s current energy needs. The problem is that this communication network deteriorates as we age, and that deterioration damages our health. The big anti-aging news, though, is that there are ways to restore the network—even when we are quite old. Many scientists now believe that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD⁺) is the main messenger. However, NAD⁺ levels fall with age, leaving the communication pathways of metabolic regulation to gradually go bad. One way to increase NAD⁺ levels is to ingest NAD precursors—molecules the body will metabolizeinto NAD⁺. The good news is that they are already on the market. Nicotinamide Riboside One naturally occurring NAD⁺ precursor is nicotinamide riboside (NR), which has been studied in clinical trials by Dr. Charles Brenner at the University of Iowa. Nicotinamide Riboside increases NAD⁺ levels in humans, a Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

It’s possible to simply reverse type 2 diabetes. There are only two things you need to do. By reading this brief post you’ll know what they are, and how to get started. Or skip ahead to the two steps right away > Quick start Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A fully reversible disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing thi Continue reading >>

Dr. Phil’s 6 Rules For Emotionally Coping With Type 2 Diabetes

Dr. Phil’s 6 Rules For Emotionally Coping With Type 2 Diabetes

Rule 1: Move forward iStock/Rawpixel Ltd You’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Now what? First, don’t give into guilt. “There’s a lot of shame associated with type 2 diabetes and a lot of judgment,” says Phil McGraw, TV show host and spokesperson for AstraZeneca and its ON IT Movement, a campaign for managing type 2 diabetes. “People think if you have type 2 diabetes, it means you’re lazy or you haven’t done the things that you need to do, and that’s simply not true.” Dr. Phil, 65, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 25 years ago, after he experienced roller-coaster energy levels. “I was glad to have some answers,” he says. “Fifty percent of the solution to any problem lies in defining it, so I said, now I have something to work on.” As you start managing your type 2 diabetes diagnosis, whether through changing your diet and exercise routine or checking blood sugar levels, remember you’re not alone. There are currently 28 millions Americans with type 2 diabetes and 86 million at risk for the disease. Don't miss these eating habits that help prevent and manage diabetes. Rule 2: Get educated iStock/sturti The more you know, the more control you’ll have over your diabetes diagnosis. “The partnership with your healthcare professional is a critical part of this,” says Pamela Kushner, MD, FAAFP, a clinical professor of family medicine at the University of California, Irvine Medical Center. “Each person with type 2 diabetes is unique, and not everyone has the same choices when it comes to diet and exercise.” Secondly, knowing why you need to make particular choices—like swapping your morning scone for eggs—makes it easier to stick with a diabetes plan. “You need to know what’s happening inside your body," says Dr. Phil. "If Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Women With Condition Reveal How They Changed Their Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Women With Condition Reveal How They Changed Their Diet

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes means people have to look after their own health. This includes maintaining good physical and mental health, preventing illness or accidents and dealing with minor ailments and long-term conditions. However, a diagnosis doesn’t have to spell the end of a full and happy life, Vitality Health and Life insurance has reiterated. Anna Cartien, 59, was diagnosed two years ago with type 2 diabetes. When she was first diagnosed, Anna immediately told herself she was going to have to ‘buckle down and get it under control’. “It wasn’t easy at first for me to stick to my new habits, but I now feel fantastic,” she said. “I wish I had made these changes earlier.” With a positive mindset, she has adopted a daily exercise routine, eats healthy meals and was even able to do what she thought impossible - quit smoking. When in hospital for kidney stones, Anna’s blood glucose levels were tested which resulted in a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. Prior to this, she had been excessively urinating and felt constantly tired. She now exercises daily, putting in 35 minutes on a rowing machine, and doing about twenty minutes of yoga. Within six months of being diagnosed, Anna lost 20 kg (45lbs), however she said making this change wasn’t easy. “Increasing my exercise was the thing I was most opposed to,” she admits. “I’m glad I made the change though, as it has made a big difference to how I feel”, she said. Anna began a low-carb diet immediately after being diagnosed. Continue reading >>

Tom Hanks On What Led To Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: 'i Was A Total Idiot'

Tom Hanks On What Led To Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: 'i Was A Total Idiot'

He's funny, charming and talented, but Tom Hanks is also "a total idiot" — according to the star himself. That's because, despite being clever in many ways, he ignored medical advice and chose to live a lifestyle that he now believes led to his type 2 diabetes diagnosis. We apologize, this video has expired. Radio Times. “I was heavy. You've seen me in movies, you know what I looked like," he continued. "I was a total idiot." Back in 2013, Hanks first revealed his ailment, telling then-"Late Show" host David Letterman, "I went to the doctor, and he said, 'You know those high blood sugar numbers you've been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you've graduated! You've got type 2 diabetes, young man,'" It seems the 59-year-old's previous attempts to bring those elevated blood sugar numbers down by dieting just weren't working. "I thought I could avoid it by removing the buns from my cheeseburgers," he told RadioTimes. "Well, it takes a little bit more than that." But it's not too late to turn things around. "My doctor says if I can hit a target weight, I will not have type 2 diabetes anymore," he adeed. But in 2013, he explained to Letterman that his teen-like target weight was one he might not be able to hit. "Well, I'm going to have type 2 diabetes then, because there is no way I can weigh [what I weighed] in high school," he said with a laugh. Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

How To Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

A new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report finds that a staggering 30 million people—roughly 1 in 10 Americans—have type 2 diabetes. Most concerning: nearly a quarter of them don’t even realize it. Just as worrisome is the prevalence of prediabetes: The new report reveals that 84 million adults, or roughly one-third of the U.S. population, have the elevated blood sugar levels that put them at high risk for developing full-blown diabetes. "We’re not seeing the rate of diabetes and prediabetes growth continue to escalate in the way it has in previous years," says Ann Albright, Ph.D., R.D., director of CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. "Still the numbers of cases of undiagnosed prediabetes, in particular, are astounding. It’s evidence that more needs to be done to reach those at risk for type 2 diabetes.” Type 2 diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., and the leading cause of disability. It is more common, though less severe, than type 1 diabetes. In both cases, the body doesn't produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels properly, which can lead to serious medical issues such as heart and kidney disease. Here are some ways to reduce your risk of developing diabetes—and if you already have it, to prevent it from progressing. Know Your Risk A fundamental step in prevention, says Albright, is paying close attention and understanding your risk factors, including being 45 or older, overweight, and physically inactive; having a family history of diabetes or conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or polycystic ovary syndrome; or having a history of gestational diabetes during pregnancy. According to the CDC’s report, prevalence is higher among African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, American Indi Continue reading >>

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Most people associate taking insulin with type 1 diabetes. However, some people with type 2 diabetes also need to take insulin. We talked with Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, Joslin Diabetes Center, to find out the truth about insulin and type 2 diabetes. Why would someone with type 2 diabetes who has been controlling their diabetes with diet and exercise need to start taking insulin? There are several reasons why someone would require insulin, even if they hadn’t needed it before. Temporary insulin usage– Some people need to take insulin for a short amount of time, because of things like pregnancy, surgery, broken bones, cancer, or steroidal medicines (like Prednisone). Permanent insulin usage - Sometimes the pancreas becomes unable to produce enough insulin. This happens frequently with aging. People can also become insulin resistant due to weight gain or chronic emotional or physical stress. Simply put, pills can no longer control diabetes. So, it’s not usually “bad” behavior that would cause someone to start insulin? Correct. However, non adherence to diet and exercise might result in high blood glucose levels that only insulin can control. Is insulin dosage different for someone who has type 2 rather than type 1? The doses will vary; either type may require very little or a lot of medication. It depends on weight, eating habits, exercise levels, existence of other illnesses and level of insulin resistance. Can someone start taking insulin and then not need to take it anymore? Absolutely! But only for those with type 2 diabetes. Often weight reduction and /or exercise can allow insulin to be stopped. Also, if any of the temporary situations listed above resolve, insulin might be stopped. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.[6] Common symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, and unexplained weight loss.[3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon.[4][5] Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise.[1] Some people are more genetically at risk than others.[6] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes, with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes.[1] In diabetes mellitus type 1 there is a lower total level of insulin to control blood glucose, due to an autoimmune induced loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[12][13] Diagnosis of diabetes is by blood tests such as fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, or glycated hemoglobin (A1C).[3] Type 2 diabetes is partly preventable by staying a normal weight, exercising regularly, and eating properly.[1] Treatment involves exercise and dietary changes.[1] If blood sugar levels are not adequately lowered, the medication metformin is typically recommended.[7][14] Many people may eventually also require insulin injections.[9] In those on insulin, routinely checking blood sugar levels is advised; however, this may not be needed in those taking pills.[15] Bariatri Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes? Tips To Help You Out

Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes? Tips To Help You Out

I was involved in a discussion over in a Facebook group recently and someone posted: What one tip would you give someone who is newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes? So I thought it would make a perfect post right here, sharing many of their tips. So that means these tips I've compiled for you are from people who have experienced this themselves and here's what some of them had to say. 20 Tips To Help You Out Your life depends on you checking your blood sugars. The numbers don't lie so you cannot claim denial. Love yourself enough to take care of yourself and report you true numbers to your doctor often. Check your blood sugars often, take your medications when you're supposed to, exercise, eat right, and NEVER GIVE UP!! You have diabetes, it doesn't have you. It's not a death sentence when a few life choices are changed. Never ignore your symptoms. Educate yourself and educate the people around you that will be with you daily. Don't panic, it's not the end of the world. Drink lots of water. Eat right, no pasta, no sweets, take your medication and exercise. You can live a normal life while maintaining blood sugars. Limit carbs and eat the right carbs. Don't give up. Cut way back on carbs. Check your sugar often, take it one day at a time. It isn't going to be easy but before you know it, it will become second nature to you. Keep your head up and remember what you do now affects you later on in life. Don't get scared it won't accomplish anything. Educate yourself and exercise. Get rid of diet soda Life will be normal again, just a new normal. Be sure to weight and portion everything and keep a food log until you know portions and have your blood sugar and eating routine under control. Join a support group and know that you aren't the only one and some days are better than oth Continue reading >>

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