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Hypertension And Diabetic Neuropathy

Hypertension And Sensorimotor Peripheral Neuropathy In Type 2 Diabetes

Hypertension And Sensorimotor Peripheral Neuropathy In Type 2 Diabetes

Hypertension and Sensorimotor Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes Jarmuzewska E.A.a Ghidoni A.a Mangoni A.A.b I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree. I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree. Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount! If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in . Save over 20% compared to the individual article price. Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use * The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules. For additional information: Background: The mechanisms responsible for the onset of sensorimotor peripheral diabetic neuropathy (SMPN) remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we studied the relationship between traditional cardiovascular risk factors, parameters of metabolic control, and the presence of SMPN in patients with type 2 diabetes of relatively short duration. Methods: Blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin, lipid profile, and the presence of micro- and macrovascular complications were assessed and monitored in 31 consecutive ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes (age 60.7 7.5 years, mean SD) within 10 years of diagnosis (mean diabetes duration 6.0 2.3 years). Results: Clinical and neurophysiological features of SMPN were present in 10 patients (SMPN+, 32%). There were no significant differences in age, gender distribution, diabetes duration, body mass index, metabolic control, and serum cholesterol between SMPN and SMPN+ patients. However, the prevalence of hypertension (i.e. blood pressure 140/90 mm Hg) was higher in SMPN+ patie Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See separate Diabetic Foot article. Diabetes may cause polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, amyotrophy and autonomic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Neuropathy plays a major role in the development of foot ulcers, which cause an enormous effect on quality of life for the patient (especially if amputation becomes necessary) and is also responsible for a very large health and social services expenditure. Optimal control of all metabolic factors and regular organised surveillance of all people with diabetes are essential to reduce the risk of both development and progression of diabetic neuropathy and therefore reduce the risk of disability for the patient. Motor, sensory and autonomic fibres may all be affected by diabetic neuropathy. Epidemiology Neuropathies related to diabetes can affect 60-70% of people with diabetes[1]. Neuropathy associated with type 2 diabetes may be present at the time of diagnosing diabetes. Neuropathy associated with type 1 diabetes usually develops more than 10 years after the diagnosis of diabetes. Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy in the world[2]. Risk factors Smoking. Age over 40 years. History of periods of poor glycaemic control. Prevalence increases with increased duration of diabetes. People with signs of neuropathy are likely also to have evidence of diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy. Hypertension. Coronary heart disease. Continue reading >>

Do Neuropathy And Hypertension Associated With Increased Risk Of Hearing Loss Amongtype 2 Diabetic Patients?

Do Neuropathy And Hypertension Associated With Increased Risk Of Hearing Loss Amongtype 2 Diabetic Patients?

Do neuropathy and hypertension associated with increased risk of hearing loss amongtype 2 diabetic patients? Abdulbari Bener1,2,3*, Ltf Hanoglu4, Hakan Cincik5, Mustafa Gzel3,Mustafa ztrk3 Ralph A. DeFronzo6, Muhammad AbdulGhani6,7 1 Dept. of Biostatistics & Medical Informatics, Cerrahpaa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul,Turkey 2 Dept. of Evidence for Population Health Unit, School of Epidemiology and Health Sciences, The university of Manchester, Manchester, UK 3 Dept. of Endocrinology, Medipol International School of Medicine, Istanbul Medipol University, Istanbul, Turkey 4 Dept. of Neurology, Medipol International School of Medicine, Istanbul Medipol University,Istanbul, Turkey 5 Dept. of ENT and Audiology, Medipol International School of Medicine, Istanbul Medipol University, Istanbul, Turkey 6 Division of Diabetes, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229,San Antonio, Texas, USA 7 Academic Health System, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar. Corresponding author: Abdulbari Bener,Istanbul University and Istanbul Medipol University,International School of Medicine,34098 ,Cerrahpasa-Istanbul, TURKEY. E-mail: [email protected] , Mobile:+90-535 663 9090 Citation: Abdulbari Bener et al (2017). Do neuropathy and hypertension associated with increased risk of hearing loss among type 2diabetic patients? Int J Beh Sci 1:2, 41-46 Copyright: et al 2017 Abdulbari Bener.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative CommonsAttribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author andsource are credited. Received Date: Novermber 16, 2017 ; Accepted Date: Novermber 17, 2017;Published Date: Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetes can harm your nerves. That damage, called neuropathy, may be painful. It can happen in several ways, and they all seem to be related to blood sugar levels being too high for too long. To prevent it, work with your doctor to manage your blood sugar. You may hear your doctor mention the four types of diabetes-related neuropathy: peripheral, autonomic, proximal, and focal. Peripheral Neuropathy This type usually affects the feet and legs. Rare cases affect the arms, abdomen, and back. Symptoms include: Tingling Numbness (which may become permanent) Burning (especially in the evening) Pain Early symptoms usually get better when your blood sugar is under control. There are medications to help manage the discomfort. What you should do: Check your feet and legs daily. Use lotion on your feet if they're dry. Take care of your toenails. Ask your doctor if you should go to a podiatrist. Wear shoes that fit well. Wear them all the time, so your feet don't get injured. Autonomic Neuropathy This type usually affects the digestive system, especially the stomach. It can also affect the blood vessels, urinary system, and sex organs. In your digestive system: Symptoms include: Bloating Diarrhea Constipation Heartburn Nausea Vomiting Feeling full after small meals What you should do: You may need to eat smaller meals and take medication to treat it. In blood vessels: Symptoms include: Blacking out when you stand up quickly Faster heartbeat Dizziness Low blood pressure Nausea Vomiting Feeling full sooner than normal If you have it: Avoid standing up too quickly. You may also need to wear special stockings (ask your doctor about them) and take medicine. In Men: Symptoms include: He may not be able to have or keep an erection, or he may have “dry” or reduced ejaculations. What Continue reading >>

[full Text] Relationship Between Chronic Complications, Hypertension, And Health-r | Dmso

[full Text] Relationship Between Chronic Complications, Hypertension, And Health-r | Dmso

Editor who approved publication: Professor Ming-Hui Zou Eduardo Seplveda,1,2 Rui Ponhos,2,3 Miguel Constante,4,5 Jos Pais-Ribeiro,1,2 Paula Freitas,68 Davide Carvalho68 1Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 2Associao de Preveno e Apoio Diabetes, Porto, Portugal; 3Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 4Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK; 5Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Beatriz ngelo, Loures, Portugal; 6Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Centro Hospitalar So Joo, Porto, Portugal; 7Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 8Instituto de Investigao e Inovao em Sade, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal Background: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the presence or absence of hypertension and diabetes-related chronic complications in type 2 diabetes, and also the association between HRQoL and the number of chronic complications. Methods: One hundred patients with type 2 diabetes were interviewed. HRQoL was evaluated using the age-adjusted Short-Form 36 dimensions (physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health). Results: The mean age of the study population was 62.78.7 years; 54.0% were male, and 51.0% were receiving only oral hypoglycemic agents. Chronic complications were related to worse HRQoL in different dimensions: peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular disease (all, except bodily pain), retinopathy (physical functioning, general health, vitality, and mental health), peripheral arterial disease (physical functioning, role-physical, and general health), and nephropa Continue reading >>

Effect Of Blood Pressure Control On Diabetic Microvascular Complications In Patients With Hypertension And Type 2 Diabetes

Effect Of Blood Pressure Control On Diabetic Microvascular Complications In Patients With Hypertension And Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE — The Appropriate Blood Pressure Control in Diabetes (ABCD) Trial is a prospective randomized blinded clinical trial that compares the effects of intensive versus moderate blood pressure control on the incidence and progression of type 2 diabetic complications. The current article discusses the results of 5.3 years of follow-up of 470 patients with hypertension and evaluates the effects of intensive and moderate blood pressure therapy using nisoldipine versus enalapril as the initial antihypertensive medication for nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS — The 470 hypertensive subjects, defined as having a baseline diastolic blood pressure of >90 mmHg, were randomized to intensive blood pressure control (diastolic blood pressure goal of 75 mmHg) versus moderate blood pressure control (diastolic blood pressure goal of 80–89 mmHg). RESULTS — The mean blood pressure achieved was 132/78 mmHg in the intensive group and 138/86 mmHg in the moderate control group. During the 5-year follow-up period, no difference was observed between intensive versus moderate blood pressure control and those randomized to nisoldipine versus enalapril with regard to the change in creatinine clearance. After the first year of antihypertensive treatment, creatinine clearance stabilized in both the intensive and moderate blood pressure control groups in those patients with baseline normo- or microalbuminuria. In contrast, patients starting with overt albuminuria demonstrated a steady decline in creatinine clearance of 5–6 ml · min–1 · 1.73 m–2 per year throughout the follow-up period whether they were on intensive or moderate therapy. There was also no difference between the interventions with regard to individuals progressing from normoalbumi Continue reading >>

Jabfp | Mobile

Jabfp | Mobile

All analyses involved data from the Oklahoma Longitudinal Assessment of Health Outcomes in Mature Adults (OKLAHOMA) Studies cohort. The methods used to recruit and enroll subjects into the cohort have been described previously. 1 Subjects over 65 years of age were recruited from the practices of 23 family physician members of the Oklahoma Physicians Resource/Research Network (OKPRN), a primary care practice-based research network. Physicians generated lists of patients >65 years old seen by them within the prior 18 months (n = 4762). From these lists, they indicated those who were no longer their patients, currently living in nursing homes (n = 213), too confused to sign informed consent (n = 165), or deceased (n = 337). An additional 815 had switched physicians, leaving 3232 potentially eligible patients. The practices sent a letter to these patients explaining the study and inviting them to participate. This was followed in 2 weeks by a telephone call from the project coordinator. The coordinator was able to reach 1977 patients, of which 11 were disqualified because of cognitive impairment (unable to understand the purpose of the call or the study). Eligible patients who agreed to participate (n = 853) were asked to complete a questionnaire, which included demographic information, health habits, medical conditions, symptoms, functional status, and several health-related quality-of-life instruments. Those who declined to participate were asked to provide information about why they were not interested, their current age and race, and their self-perceived state of health. Participants were more likely than non-participants to be male (43% vs. 37%; P = .002), younger (P < .0001), better educated (P = <.0001), and in better health (P = <.0001). Blacks tended to be less wi Continue reading >>

Hypertension-induced Peripheral Neuropathy And The Combined Effects Ofhypertension And Diabetes On Nerve Structure And Function In Rats.

Hypertension-induced Peripheral Neuropathy And The Combined Effects Ofhypertension And Diabetes On Nerve Structure And Function In Rats.

1. Acta Neuropathol. 2012 Oct;124(4):561-73. doi: 10.1007/s00401-012-1012-6. Epub2012 Jul 13. Hypertension-induced peripheral neuropathy and the combined effects ofhypertension and diabetes on nerve structure and function in rats. Gregory JA(1), Jolivalt CG, Goor J, Mizisin AP, Calcutt NA. (1)Department of Pathology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, 92093-0612, USA. Diabetic neuropathy includes damage to neurons, Schwann cells and blood vessels. Rodent models of diabetes do not adequately replicate all pathological featuresof diabetic neuropathy, particularly Schwann cell damage. We, therefore, testedthe hypothesis that combining hypertension, a risk factor for neuropathy indiabetic patients, with insulin-deficient diabetes produces a more pertinentmodel of peripheral neuropathy. Behavioral, physiological and structural indices of neuropathy were measured for up to 6 months in spontaneously hypertensive and age-matched normotensive rats with or without concurrent streptozotocin-induceddiabetes. Hypertensive rats developed nerve ischemia, thermal hyperalgesia, nerveconduction slowing and axonal atrophy. Thinly myelinated fibers withsupernumerary Schwann cells indicative of cycles of demyelination andremyelination were also identified along with reduced nerve levels of myelinbasic protein. Similar disorders were noted in streptozotocin-diabetic rats,except that thinly myelinated fibers were not observed and expression of myelinbasic protein was normal. Superimposing diabetes on hypertension compoundeddisorders of nerve blood flow, conduction slowing and axonal atrophy andincreased the incidence of thinly myelinated fibers. Rats with combinedinsulinopenia, hyperglycemia and hypertension provide a model for diabeticneuropathy that offers an opportunity to stud Continue reading >>

Prevent Complications

Prevent Complications

Diabetes can affect any part of your body. The good news is that you can prevent most of these problems by keeping your blood glucose (blood sugar) under control, eating healthy, being physical active, working with your health care provider to keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control, and getting necessary screening tests. How are cholesterol, triglyceride, weight, and blood pressure problems related to diabetes? How can I be "heart healthy" and avoid cardiovascular disease if I have diabetes? How can I keep my eyes healthy if I have diabetes? How can I keep my kidneys healthy if I have diabetes? Why is it especially important to take care of my feet if I have diabetes? What should I do on a regular basis to take care of my feet? Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Neuropathy, Hypertension And Red Blood Cell Na/k Atpase In Patients With Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus - Em|consulte

Relationship Between Neuropathy, Hypertension And Red Blood Cell Na/k Atpase In Patients With Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus - Em|consulte

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NEUROPATHY, HYPERTENSION AND RED BLOOD CELL Na/K ATPASE IN PATIENTS WITH INSULIN-DEPENDENT DIABETES MELLITUS M.F. Jannot, D. Raccah, D. Dufayet de La Tour, T. Coste, J. Gouvernet, P. Vague Hypertension has been proposed as an independent risk factor for diabetic neuropathy. In insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) patients suffering from neuropathy, red blood cell (RBC) Na/K ATPase is decreased. Such a decrease might be involved in the physiopathology of hypertension and therefore be the link between hypertension and neuropathy. To confirm this hypothesis, we studied 104 IDDM patients with a long duration of disease by looking at the association between neuropathy and hypertension and by comparing RBC Na/K ATPase activity in subgroups. The independent risk factors associated with neuropathy were hypertension, triglyceride level, diabetes duration and low RBC Na/K ATPase activity. Contrary to our expectations, Na/K ATPase was not decreased in hypertensive patients (294 16 nmol Pi/mg prot/h vs 303 9), but those treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor had higher RBC Na/K ATPase activity than those treated with calcium blockers (355 15 nmol Pi/mg prot/h vs 216 10). These results confirm the association between neuropathy and hypertension, on the one hand, and neuropathy and decreased Na/K ATPase, on the other, and show that hypertension in IDDM patients was not associated with decreased RBC Na/K ATPase. Moreover, ACE inhibitor treatment in IDDM patients, whether hypertensive or not, was associated with higher levels of RBC Na/K ATPase, which could account for its beneficial effect on diabetic neuropathy. 35-42. Rapports entre la neuropathie, l'hypertension et l'activit Na/K ATPase rythrocytaire chez les diabtiques insulino-dpendants. L'h Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Association Of Chronic Diabetes And Hypertension In Sural Nerve Morphometry: An Experimental Study

Association Of Chronic Diabetes And Hypertension In Sural Nerve Morphometry: An Experimental Study

Association of chronic diabetes and hypertension in sural nerve morphometry: an experimental study ValriaPaulaSassoliFazan 1 , 5 Email author Sanada et al.; licensee BioMed Central.2015 Prospective studies have shown incidence rates of hypertension in diabetes mellitus to be three times that of subjects without diabetes mellitus. The reverse also applies, with the incidence of diabetes two to three times higher in patients with hypertension. Despite this common clinical association, the contribution of each isolated entity in the development of a neuropathy is still not well understood. The aims of the present study were to investigate the presence of peripheral neuropathy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and SHR with chronically induced diabetes, using a morphological and morphometric study of the sural nerves. Female SHR and normotensive Wistar rats (WR), 8weeks old, received a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ) through the tail vein. Controls from both strains received vehicle. Twelve weeks after the injection, sural nerves were dissected and prepared for light microscopy. Morphometry of sural nerve fascicles and myelinated fibers was performed with the aid of computer software. The sural nerve myelinated fibers were highly affected by experimental diabetes in normotensive rats, causing mainly the reduction of the fiber size. Hypertensive rats showed characteristics of small fiber neuropathy and a severe reduction of the number and density or Schwann cells. The association between diabetes and hypertension caused an increase on the average size of the myelinated fibers, pointing to a small fiber loss, associated to axonal atrophy. Our study gives morphological support to the existence of a neuropathy due to hypertension, which is among one Continue reading >>

Hypertension As A Risk Factor For Diabetic Neuropathy: A Prospective Study.

Hypertension As A Risk Factor For Diabetic Neuropathy: A Prospective Study.

Hypertension as a risk factor for diabetic neuropathy: a prospective study. Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. The pathogeneses of diabetic neuropathy is still unclear. This study prospectively investigated the risk factors for distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSP) in a cohort of childhood-onset IDDM patients. Subjects from the Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) Study were clinically examined at baseline and then biennially. DSP was diagnosed by a combination of clinical criteria, symptoms and signs (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial [DCCT] exam), and quantitative sensory threshold (QST). Among the 463 (70.4%) subjects who were free of DSP at baseline, 453 (97.8%) participated in at least one biennial reexamination during the first 6 years of follow-up and were included in the current analysis. A total of 68 (15.0%) subjects developed DSP in 6 years, giving a cumulative probability of 0.29. The Cox proportional hazards model shows that longer IDDM duration, hypertension, poor glycemic control, height, and smoking were all independent predictors of the incidence of DSP (all P < 0.0001, except for smoking for which P = 0.03). Hypertension showed the greatest impact on the development of DSP for individuals with either short or long IDDM duration. This study confirms some risk factors for DSP found in cross-sectional studies and suggests a strong relationship between hypertension and DSP. The results indicate that in addition to good glycemic control, avoidance of smoking and good blood pressure control may be helpful in preventing or delaying the onset of DSP in IDDM patients. Continue reading >>

Correlation Of Duration, Hypertension And Glycemic Control With Microvascular Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus At A Tertiary Care Hospital

Correlation Of Duration, Hypertension And Glycemic Control With Microvascular Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus At A Tertiary Care Hospital

Correlation of duration, hypertension and glycemic control with microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus at a tertiary care hospital Aim: To evaluate microvascular complications in Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and to study correlation of Microvascular Complication with duration of diabetes, glycemic control and hypertension in a tertiary care centre. Though the study is not uncommon there are very few published reports on correlation of all three factors (together in the same study) with microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus. Materials and methods: Design: Retrospective, observational study. The study has been done through 2007 to 2009 in general hospital, Ahmedabad, India and comprises of 500 patients with Diabetes Mellitus with detailed history, physical examination and laboratory investigations including vibration perception test/electromyography/nerve conduction velocity, fundus examination and urine for microalbuminuria/urine for protein. Results: Diabetic Retinopathy was the most common complication observed in the present study with prevalence of 42% (210/500) followed by Diabetic Neuropathy with a prevalence of 38% (190/500) and Diabetic Nephropathy with a prevalence of 35% (175/500). Diabetic Retinopathy, Neuropathy and Nephropathy all were associated with poor glycemic control. 190/210 (90%) patients of Diabetic Retinopathy, 175/190 (92%) patients of Diabetic Neuropathy and all 175 patients of Diabetic Nephropathy had associated hypertension. 85/210 (40%) patients of Diabetic Retinopathy had duration between 10-15 years, 115/210 (55%) patients of Diabetic Retinopathy had a duration of >15 years, 70/190 (37%) patients of Diabetic Neuropathy had duration of DM 10-15 years and 70/190 (37%) patients had duration of DM >15years. 95/175 (54%) patients Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

What is peripheral neuropathy? Your peripheral nervous system connects the nerves from your brain and spinal cord, or central nervous system, to the rest of your body. This includes your: arms hands feet legs internal organs mouth face The job of these nerves is to deliver signals about physical sensations back to your brain. Peripheral neuropathy is a disorder that occurs when these nerves malfunction because they’re damaged or destroyed. This disrupts the nerves’ normal functioning. They might send signals of pain when there’s nothing causing pain, or they might not send a pain signal even if something is harming you. This can be due to: an injury systemic illness an infection an inherited disorder The disorder is uncomfortable, but treatments can be very helpful. The most important thing to determine is whether peripheral neuropathy is the result of a serious underlying condition. More than 100 different types of peripheral neuropathy exist. Each type has unique symptoms and specific treatment options. Peripheral neuropathies are further classified by the type of nerve damage involved. Mononeuropathy occurs when only one nerve is damaged. Polyneuropathies, which are more common, occur when multiple nerves are damaged. The three types of peripheral nerves are: sensory nerves, which connect to your skin motor nerves, which connect to your muscles autonomic nerves, which connect to your internal organs Peripheral neuropathy can affect one nerve group or all three. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include: tingling in the hands or feet a feeling like you’re wearing a tight glove or sock sharp, stabbing pains a weak, heavy feeling in the arms and legs, which sometimes may feel like your legs or arms lock in place regularly dropping things from your hands a bu Continue reading >>

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