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Humulin Novolin

Short-acting Insulins

Short-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Onset: 30 minutes Peak: 2.5 - 5 hours Duration: 4 - 12 hours Solution: Clear Comments: Best if administered 30 minutes before a meal. Mixing NPH: If Regular insulin is mixed with NPH human insulin, the Regular insulin should be drawn into the syringe first. Aspart - Novolog ®: Compatible - but NO support clinically for such a mixture. Draw up Novolog first before drawing up Regular Insulin. Lispro - Humalog ®: Compatible - but NO support clinically for such a mixture. Draw up Humalog first before drawing up Regular Insulin. Mixtures should not be administered intravenously. When mixing insulin in a syringe, draw up the quickest acting insulin first (e.g. draw up Humalog or Novolog before drawing up Regular Insulin, or draw up Regular insulin before Novolin N (NPH) or Lente insulin. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Insulin is a polypeptide hormone that controls the storage and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. This activity occurs primarily in the liver, in muscle, and in adipose tissues after binding of the insulin molecules to receptor sites on cellular plasma membranes. Insulin promotes uptake of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in most tissues. Also, insulin influences carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism by stimulating protein and free fatty acid synthesis, and by inhibiting release of free fatty acid from adipose cells. Insulin increases active glucose transport through muscle and adipose cellular membranes, and promotes conversion of intracellular glucose and free fatty acid to the appropriate storage forms (glycogen and triglyceride, respectively). Although the liver does not require active glucose transport, insulin increases hepatic gl Continue reading >>

Humulin R, Novolin R (insulin Regular Human) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Humulin R, Novolin R (insulin Regular Human) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Never share pen between patients even if needle is changed Use with caution in patients with decreased insulin requirements: Diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, malabsorption, hypothyroidism, renal impairment, and hepatic impairment Use with caution in patients with increased insulin requirements: Fever, hyperthyroidism, trauma, infection, and surgery Rapid changes in serum glucose may induce symptoms of hypoglycemia; increase monitoring with changes to insulin dosage, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with renal impairment or hepatic impairment or hypoglycemia unawareness Hypoglycemia is the most common cause of adverse reactions (headache, tachycardia, etc) May cause a shift in potassium from extracellular to intracellular space, possibly leading to hypokalemia; caution when coadministered with potassium-lowering drugs or when administered to patients with a condition that may decrease potassium Thiazolidinediones are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma agonists and can cause dose-related fluid retention, particularly when used in combination with insulin; fluid retention may lead to or exacerbate heart failure; monitor for signs and symptoms of heart failure, treat the patient accordingly, and consider discontinuing thiazolidinediones Change in insulin regimen should be carried out under close medical supervision and frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased Severe, life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur; discontinue therapy if indicated Not for mixing with any insulin for intravenous use or with insulins other than NPH insulin for subcutaneous use Continue reading >>

Is There A Difference Between Humulin And Novolin 70/30?

Is There A Difference Between Humulin And Novolin 70/30?

No, they are both synthetic, premixed, combination brands of insulin. (I am assuming the Humulin is a 70/30 also) You should not change brands of insulin without checking with your doctor first. Continue reading >>

Humulin N Vs Novolin N - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Humulin N Vs Novolin N - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Diabetes Discussion: Your Dog Anything related to your diabetic dog. I apologize if this article was already shared with everybody here. I found it very interesting as what is described here is so similar to how Sammie reacted to the change. What is so shocking is they state that a dog's reaction to the change is delayed. I believe we changed in October but Sammie's hypos occurred in late December. We have definitely had to adjust her dosage since the change. All I can say is thank God for home testing! Saved me a bundle and, more importantly, probably saved Sammie's life Karen & Sammie 65 lb Female Golden Retriever/Collie 12 years old. Addisons and diabetes diagnosed June, 2011. 15 U am/ 8 U pm Novolin N & 2 mg of Prednisone/day. 3 cups Nature's Variety Limited Ingredient Lamb split into 4x a day feedings. that's interesting Karen. Thanks. Jenny is already on a lower dose of Novolin than she was Humulin but she went really really low this weekend even with a food increase Jenny: 6/6/2000 - 11/10/2014 She lived with diabetes and cushings for 3 1/2 years. She was one of a kind and we miss her. it was when jesse switched to humulin from novolin and the switch back it started with an earlier onset then seemed to change to a later onset now this is all speculation because as we know if you are testing everyday blood sugar is subject to change and is not uncommon from day to day but i believe it has a different response The good news - after I did a full curve this weekend - is Sammie's blood sugar definitely seems flatter than before. Unfortunately it was all in the 200-300's. Just increased her evening dose from 14.5 to 15 (it used to be 16). Perhaps a dog's body takes a while to adjust to the new stuff - hopefully she's adjusted! On my toes :-) Karen & Sammie 65 lb Femal Continue reading >>

Humulin Versus Novolin Nph Insulin: Are They Bioequivalent?

Humulin Versus Novolin Nph Insulin: Are They Bioequivalent?

Recently, several of my diabetic dog owners have asked if they can switch their NPH brand to Walmart's Relion/Novolin insulin to replace the Humulin N insulin that they are now using. It turns out that the Walmart ReliOn brand of NPH is much cheaper (only $25 per vial). Though the two insulins both seem to be NPH insulin, I have some concerns about this change. Any concerns with the ReliOn brand or in switching from Humulin N to Novolin N insulin? My Response: In theory, you'd think that Humulin N (Eli Lilly) and Novolin N (Novo Nordisk) would be bioequivalent (and therefore interchangeable), as they're just different brands of NPH insulin. However, that is not always the case. Humulin N and Novolin N are made using different ingredients and manufacturing techniques, so they are not identical (1,2). Like you noted, Walmart sells NPH insulin as the Novolin/ReliOn brand for much less than most other pharmacies do, at only about $25 per vial (3). A number of dogs have now been reported where they were stable and doing well on Humulin N. However, when switched to the same dose of Novolin N, their diabetic state was no longer regulated and the dogs developed signs of either hypo- or hyperglycemia, requiring significant dose adjustments (4). Bottom Line: Most dogs will respond well to the Novolin/ReliOn brand of insulin, which is indeed much less expensive than most other brands of NPH insulin. However, we cannot just assume that the two insulin preparations would be equivalent. I would not recommend switching from one insulin to the other without close monitoring (including blood glucose curves) so that the dose can be adjusted as needed. References: Continue reading >>

Brand Names: Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R Penfill, Relion/novolin R

Brand Names: Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R Penfill, Relion/novolin R

A A A Medications and Drugs Generic Name: insulin regular (Pronunciation: IN soo lin REG yoo lar) What is insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What are the possible side effects of insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What is the most important information I should know about insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? How should I use insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What happens if I miss a dose (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What happens if I overdose (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What should I avoid while using insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What other drugs will affect insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? What is insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? Insulin is a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin regular is a short-acting form of insulin. Insulin regular is used to treat diabetes. Insulin regular may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, ReliOn/Novolin R)? Get emergency medical help if you Continue reading >>

Humulin N Vs. Novolin N: A Side-by-side Comparison

Humulin N Vs. Novolin N: A Side-by-side Comparison

Diabetes is a disease that causes high blood sugar levels. Not treating your high blood sugar levels can damage your heart and blood vessels. It can also lead to stroke, kidney failure, and blindness. Humulin N and Novolin N are both injectable drugs that treat diabetes by lowering your blood sugar levels. Humulin N and Novolin N are two brands of the same kind of insulin. Insulin lowers your blood sugar levels by sending messages to your muscle and fat cells to use sugar from your blood. It also tells your liver to stop making sugar. We’ll help you compare and contrast these drugs to help you decide if one is a better choice for you. Humulin N and Novolin N are both brand names for the same drug, called insulin NPH. Insulin NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin lasts longer in your body than natural insulin does. Both drugs come in a vial as a solution that you inject with a syringe. Humulin N also comes as a solution you inject with a device called a KwikPen. You do not need a prescription to buy Novolin N or Humulin N from the pharmacy. However, you do need to talk to your doctor before you start using it. Only your doctor knows whether this insulin is right for you and how much you need to use. The table below compares more drug features of Humulin N and Novolin N. Humulin N Novolin N What drug is it? Insulin NPH Insulin NPH Why is it used? To control blood sugar in people with diabetes To control blood sugar in people with diabetes Do I need a prescription to buy this drug? No* No* Is a generic version available? No No What forms does it come in? Injectable solution, available in a vial that you use with a syringe Injectable solution, available in a cartridge that you use in a device called a KwikPen Injectable solution, available in Continue reading >>

Combination Insulins

Combination Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Novolin® 70/30 - Humulin® 70/30 Novolog® Mix 70/30 Humalog® Mix 75/25 SOLIQUA™ 100/33 (insulin glargine and lixisenatide injection) XULTOPHY® 100/3.6 (insulin degludec and liraglutide injection) --® Onset: 30-60 min Peak: 2-12 hours Duration: 18 - 24 hours Solution: Cloudy Comments: Mixture of 70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection. Recommended interval between dosing and meal initiation: 30 minutes. Mixing You should not attempt to change the ratio of this product by adding additional NPH or Regular insulin to the vial. If the physician has prescribed insulin mixed in a proportion other than 70% NPH and 30% Regular, you should use the separate insulin formulations (e.g. NPH and Regular insulin ) in the amounts recommended by the physician. All Unopened Novolin 70/30: • Keep all unopened Novolin 70/30 in the refrigerator between 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). • Do not freeze. Do not use Novolin 70/30 if it has been frozen. • If refrigeration is not possible, the unopened vial may be kept at room temperature for up to 6 weeks (42 days), as long as it is kept at or below 77°F (25°C). • Keep unopened Novolin 70/30 in the carton to protect from light. Novolin 70/30 in use: Vials • Keep at room temperature below 77°F (25°C) for up to 6 weeks (42 days). • Keep vials away from direct heat or light. • Throw away an opened vial after 6 weeks (42 days) of use, even if there is insulin left in the vial. • Unopened vials can be used until the expiration date on the Novolin 70/30 label, if the medicine has been stored in a refrigerator. Note: double mouse click to return to the top of the page Onset Continue reading >>

Why Is Some Insulin Available Over The Counter?

Why Is Some Insulin Available Over The Counter?

To answer this, we walk you through the history of drug regulation in the U.S. There’s been a resurgence of interest in non-prescription insulin, no doubt a result of the high prices for the most widely dispensed-by-prescription branded analogs and a political climate that’s breeding uncertainty over the continued availability of insurance for people with diabetes. People have been turning to old-line products, such as Lilly Humulin and Novo-Nordisk Novolin, and Walmart’s store-branded ReliOn products, or at least researching whether such lower-cost brands are an option. sponsor Why is a prescription for Novo Novolin, one of the products supplied under the ReliOn brand at Wal-Mart, available just for the asking if Novo’s Novolog is not? To begin to understand why and why not, it’s useful to look at how the federal and state public health agencies have historically approached drug safety and effectiveness. Read more: Why Walmart insulin isn’t the answer. Federal Regulation The insulin varieties that are available today can trace their lineages back to the days before there was a U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and before many states had pure food and drug laws, professional pharmacists’ codes, or regulations restricting distribution of medicinal products. Pretty much all that was required in the 1930’s to lawfully manufacture insulin for sale was the right to do so under the Banting patent and a manufacturing facility meeting the U.S. Agriculture Department’s standards for cleanliness. In the beginning, there was one U.S. patent holder — Eli Lilly — and one Lilly plant in Indianapolis extracting insulin from material shipped from slaughterhouses. As long as those responsible for mixing the batches took proper steps not to let impurities in and th Continue reading >>

Similarities And Differences Between Novolin R Vs Humulin R

Similarities And Differences Between Novolin R Vs Humulin R

Similarities and Differences Between Novolin R vs Humulin R Novolin R and Humulin R are injectable insulin drugs that are prescribed to patients with diabetes. Diabetes is a condition where the body cannot produce enough insulin, which leads to high levels of blood glucose. If left untreated, high levels of blood glucose can cause diabetes complications such as blindness, kidney failure, or stroke. To prevent these complications, diabetic patients can take insulin drugs such as Novolin R and Humulin R. Insulin helps to reduce high amounts of blood sugar by sending signals to the fat and muscle cells to absorb sugar from the bloodstream. Bothmedications work the same as the natural insulin hormone. When injected under the skin, these insulin drugs work by reducing high amounts of blood glucose. We will take a closer look at the similarities and differences of these 2 insulin drugs. Itis a short-acting man-made insulin that works similarly to the naturally made hormone. Novolin R is usually prescribed in combination with an exercise and diet program. When administered subcutaneously, Novolin R helps blood sugar to enter the muscle cells where it is used for energy.It may be prescribed with intermediate or long-acting insulin . Itis a brand name of insulin regular, which is a man-made insulin that works by reducing high levels of blood sugar in the body. Humulin R is taken via injection into the fatty skin tissue. This short-acting insulin drug can also be administered intravenously with the help of a health-care provider. The drugshould not be used if the solution contains particles or has changed colors. Similarities and differences between Novolin R vs Humulin R Novolin R and Humulin R are 2 brand names of the same diabetes drug called regular insulin . Regular insulin Continue reading >>

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use. INSULIN-INJECTION, Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin GENERIC NAME: INSULIN - INJECTION (IN-sue-lin) BRAND NAME(S): Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin HOW TO USE: Insulin must be injected. Learn the proper way to inject insulin. Check the dose carefully. Clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site daily to prevent skin bulges or pockets. Do not inject cold insulin. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature. The length of time you can store it at room temp. depends on the product. Consult your pharmacist. Insulin is frequently injected 30 minutes before a meal. Some inject at bedtime. Ask your pharmacist or nurse for details of injecting insulin as it varies depending on your insulin treatment plan. Monitor your urine or blood sugar as prescribed. Keep track of your results. This is very important in order to determine the correct insulin dose. Follow all of your doctor's directions carefully. Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication SIDE EFFECTS: Insulin may cause minor and usually temporary side effects such as rash, irritation or redness at the injection site. To help prevent hypoglycemia, eat meals on a regular schedule. Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The symptoms include cold sweat, shaking, rapid heart rate, weakness, headache and fainting which, if untreated, may lead to slurred speech and other behaviors that resemble drunkenness. If you experience these symptoms, eat a quick source of sugar such as glucose (glutose, etc.) table sugar, orange juice, honey or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor about the r Continue reading >>

Humulin R

Humulin R

HUMULIN®R (regular insulin human) Injection, USP (rDNA Origin) 100 Units per ML (U-100) DESCRIPTION Humulin® R U-100 is a polypeptide hormone structurally identical to human insulin synthesized through rDNA technology in a special non-disease-producing laboratory strain of Escherichia coli bacteria. Humulin R (insulin human recombinant) U-100 has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808. Humulin R (insulin human recombinant) U-100 is a sterile, clear, aqueous, and colorless solution that contains human insulin (rDNA origin) 100 units/mL, glycerin 16 mg/mL and metacresol 2.5 mg/mL, endogenous zinc (approximately 0.015 mg/100 units) and water for injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.8. Sodiumhydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. Adequate insulin dosage permits patients with diabetes to effectively utilize carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Regardless of dose strength, insulin enables carbohydrate metabolism to occur and thus to prevent the production of ketone bodies by the liver. Some patients develop severe insulin resistance such that daily doses of several hundred units of insulin or more are required. Continue reading >>

Nph Insulin

Nph Insulin

NPH insulin, also known as isophane insulin, is an intermediate–acting insulin given to help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.[3] It is used by injection under the skin once to twice a day.[1] Onset of effects is typically in 90 minutes and they last for 24 hours.[3] Versions are available that come premixed with a short–acting insulin, such as regular insulin.[2] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] NPH insulin is made by mixing regular insulin and protamine in exact proportions with zinc and phenol such that a neutral-pH is maintained and crystals form.[1] There are human and pig insulin based versions.[1] Protamine insulin was first created in 1936 and NPH insulin in 1946.[1] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[4] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 2.23 to 10.35 USD per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[5] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds while in the United States this amount costs about 134.00 USD.[2][6] Chemistry[edit] NPH insulin is cloudy and has an onset of 1–4 hours. Its peak is 6–10 hours and its duration is about 10–16 hours. History[edit] Hans Christian Hagedorn (1888–1971) and August Krogh (1874–1949) obtained the rights for insulin from Banting and Best in Toronto, Canada. In 1923 they formed Nordisk Insulin laboratorium, and in 1926 with August Kongsted he obtained a Danish Royal Charter as a non-profit foundation. In 1936, Hagedorn and B. Norman Jensen discovered that the effects of injecte Continue reading >>

Changing Insulin Brands May Disrupt Diabetics

Changing Insulin Brands May Disrupt Diabetics

For nearly three years after a miniature pinscher named Ditty was diagnosed with diabetes, his owner successfully managed his blood-sugar levels by giving him regular shots of insulin. Then Ditty abruptly turned hypoglycemic. His owner brought the shaky, unsteady dog to his veterinary clinic in Poland, Maine. Dr. Derralyn Rennix quizzed Ditty’s owner about what might have changed in the dog’s daily routine. Different food? More exercise? That’s when the owner remembered: A week or two earlier, the Wal-Mart pharmacy where she purchased Ditty’s insulin had switched his brand of medication because of changes in pricing. “She was told by the pharmacist that they were the same,” Rennix told the VIN News Service. “...They switched — without calling us, without asking us, without telling us, they just told the owner it was the same.” The idea that different brands of the same type of insulin are readily interchangeable isn’t unusual. It’s a common understanding in the medical community. But while it may be true for most human diabetics, switching brands seems to spell trouble for some veterinary patients. On the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), an online community for the profession, numerous practitioners around the country have reported in recent months cases of dogs whose insulin brands were switched developing out-of-control blood glucose levels, a potentially life-threatening condition that can be expensive to remedy. Dr. Sherri Wilson, an internal medicine consultant at VIN, called the information “an eye-opener.” On a message board discussion in which multiple colleagues described cases of dysregulation, Wilson commented, “It has really changed how I think about this brand change ...” Asked about its policies and practices in substitut Continue reading >>

Regular Insulin

Regular Insulin

Regular insulin, also known as neutral insulin and soluble insulin is a type of short acting insulin.[1] It is used to treat diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[1] Onset of effect is typically in 30 minutes and they last for 8 hours.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Regular insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[1] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[1] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[5] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[6] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 2.39 to 10.61 USD per 1,000 iu of regular insulin.[7] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while in the United States this amount is about 134.00 USD.[1][8] Versions are also available mixed with longer–acting versions of insulin, such as NPH insulin.[1] Medical uses[edit] It is used for the long term management of diabetes.[3] Regular insulin is the treatment of choice for the two diabetic emergencies diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It may also be used in combination with glucose to lower potassium leve Continue reading >>

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