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Humulin N Vs Nph

Humulin N Vs Novolin N - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Humulin N Vs Novolin N - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Diabetes Discussion: Your Dog Anything related to your diabetic dog. I apologize if this article was already shared with everybody here. I found it very interesting as what is described here is so similar to how Sammie reacted to the change. What is so shocking is they state that a dog's reaction to the change is delayed. I believe we changed in October but Sammie's hypos occurred in late December. We have definitely had to adjust her dosage since the change. All I can say is thank God for home testing! Saved me a bundle and, more importantly, probably saved Sammie's life Karen & Sammie 65 lb Female Golden Retriever/Collie 12 years old. Addisons and diabetes diagnosed June, 2011. 15 U am/ 8 U pm Novolin N & 2 mg of Prednisone/day. 3 cups Nature's Variety Limited Ingredient Lamb split into 4x a day feedings. that's interesting Karen. Thanks. Jenny is already on a lower dose of Novolin than she was Humulin but she went really really low this weekend even with a food increase Jenny: 6/6/2000 - 11/10/2014 She lived with diabetes and cushings for 3 1/2 years. She was one of a kind and we miss her. it was when jesse switched to humulin from novolin and the switch back it started with an earlier onset then seemed to change to a later onset now this is all speculation because as we know if you are testing everyday blood sugar is subject to change and is not uncommon from day to day but i believe it has a different response The good news - after I did a full curve this weekend - is Sammie's blood sugar definitely seems flatter than before. Unfortunately it was all in the 200-300's. Just increased her evening dose from 14.5 to 15 (it used to be 16). Perhaps a dog's body takes a while to adjust to the new stuff - hopefully she's adjusted! On my toes :-) Karen & Sammie 65 lb Femal Continue reading >>

Insulin Detemir (levemir) Versus Nph Insulin (humulin N) In Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin Detemir (levemir) Versus Nph Insulin (humulin N) In Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes

This study compared the efficacy of two insulin types in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). HbA1c levels were similar with either insulin type, while the fasting plasma glucose was lower with insulin detemir (Levemir) use. Due to destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, T1DM patients have very low insulin levels; it is not enough to control blood sugar. T1DM requires continuous treatment with insulin. It is usually given in two forms: long or intermediate-acting and short-acting. The different types were designed to mimic the body’s natural patterns of insulin production. Short-acting insulin is given before meals, while the other types are usually given in the evening (their effect is milder and longer). NPH insulin is an intermediate-acting insulin, while insulin detemir is a long-acting insulin. Pregnancy in T1DM women exposes the mother and fetus to many risks which can be prevented by tightly controlling blood sugar levels. The glycated hemoglobin (or HbA1c) test result reflects the average blood sugar level for the past 2-3 months. The fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) measures the blood sugar level after several hours of fasting. The present study included 310 pregnant women with T1DM. 152 patients were treated with insulin detemir, while 158 received NPH insulin. Around half of the patients in each group began treatment before conception, while the other half began treatment 8-12 weeks into the pregnancy. HbA1c levels were similar at 36 weeks: 6.27% with insulin detemir, 6.33% under insulin NPH. The FPG was significantly lower in the insulin detemir group versus NPH at both 24 and 36 weeks into the pregnancy. There was no significant difference in the number of episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) between the two groups. Continue reading >>

Humulin N Vs. Novolin N: A Side-by-side Comparison

Humulin N Vs. Novolin N: A Side-by-side Comparison

Diabetes is a disease that causes high blood sugar levels. Not treating your high blood sugar levels can damage your heart and blood vessels. It can also lead to stroke, kidney failure, and blindness. Humulin N and Novolin N are both injectable drugs that treat diabetes by lowering your blood sugar levels. Humulin N and Novolin N are two brands of the same kind of insulin. Insulin lowers your blood sugar levels by sending messages to your muscle and fat cells to use sugar from your blood. It also tells your liver to stop making sugar. We’ll help you compare and contrast these drugs to help you decide if one is a better choice for you. Humulin N and Novolin N are both brand names for the same drug, called insulin NPH. Insulin NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin lasts longer in your body than natural insulin does. Both drugs come in a vial as a solution that you inject with a syringe. Humulin N also comes as a solution you inject with a device called a KwikPen. You do not need a prescription to buy Novolin N or Humulin N from the pharmacy. However, you do need to talk to your doctor before you start using it. Only your doctor knows whether this insulin is right for you and how much you need to use. The table below compares more drug features of Humulin N and Novolin N. Humulin N Novolin N What drug is it? Insulin NPH Insulin NPH Why is it used? To control blood sugar in people with diabetes To control blood sugar in people with diabetes Do I need a prescription to buy this drug? No* No* Is a generic version available? No No What forms does it come in? Injectable solution, available in a vial that you use with a syringe Injectable solution, available in a cartridge that you use in a device called a KwikPen Injectable solution, available in Continue reading >>

Changing Insulin Brands May Disrupt Diabetics

Changing Insulin Brands May Disrupt Diabetics

For nearly three years after a miniature pinscher named Ditty was diagnosed with diabetes, his owner successfully managed his blood-sugar levels by giving him regular shots of insulin. Then Ditty abruptly turned hypoglycemic. His owner brought the shaky, unsteady dog to his veterinary clinic in Poland, Maine. Dr. Derralyn Rennix quizzed Ditty’s owner about what might have changed in the dog’s daily routine. Different food? More exercise? That’s when the owner remembered: A week or two earlier, the Wal-Mart pharmacy where she purchased Ditty’s insulin had switched his brand of medication because of changes in pricing. “She was told by the pharmacist that they were the same,” Rennix told the VIN News Service. “...They switched — without calling us, without asking us, without telling us, they just told the owner it was the same.” The idea that different brands of the same type of insulin are readily interchangeable isn’t unusual. It’s a common understanding in the medical community. But while it may be true for most human diabetics, switching brands seems to spell trouble for some veterinary patients. On the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), an online community for the profession, numerous practitioners around the country have reported in recent months cases of dogs whose insulin brands were switched developing out-of-control blood glucose levels, a potentially life-threatening condition that can be expensive to remedy. Dr. Sherri Wilson, an internal medicine consultant at VIN, called the information “an eye-opener.” On a message board discussion in which multiple colleagues described cases of dysregulation, Wilson commented, “It has really changed how I think about this brand change ...” Asked about its policies and practices in substitut Continue reading >>

Basal Insulins (intermediate And Long-acting)

Basal Insulins (intermediate And Long-acting)

Who? Intermediate- and long-acting (basal) insulins are recommended for patients with type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. They may also be used in other types of diabetes (i.e. steroid-induced). Persons with type 1 diabetes generally use intermediate-acting insulin or long-acting insulin in conjunction with regular or rapid acting insulin. Persons with type 2 diabetes may use intermediate or long-acting insulins in conjunction with regular or rapid acting insulins or with oral medications. What? Injections given under the skin. Not suitable for insulin pumps. These medications can be injected with a traditional syringe and needle, or with a disposable pen that has been prefilled with insulin. Most patients tend to prefer pens though while convenient, they can be more expensive. The most common type of intermediate-acting insulin is: NPH (marketed as Humulin N and the Humulin N Pen) NPH (marketed as Novolin N and the Novolin N FlexPen) Long-acting insulins are marketed as different brands. The common ones are: Glargine (marketed as Lantus and the Solo Star Pen) Detemir (marketed as Levemir and the FlexPen) Degludec (marketed as Tresiba and the FlexTouch Pen) Where? These medicines are injected into the tissue under the skin and are slowly released into the body. These insulins allow glucose from the bloodstream to enter the cells in the body so that glucose can be used as energy. They also reduce glucose release into the bloodstream. When? NPH is usually injected twice a day. It begins working 1-3 hours after injection, and is most effective between 4-10 hours of injection. It generally keeps working for 10-16 hours. Detemir can be used once or twice a day. It begins working a few hours after injection and generally keeps working for anywhere from 20-24 hours. Glarg Continue reading >>

Intermediate-acting Insulins

Intermediate-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Onset: 1- 2 hours Peak: 4-12 hours Duration: 14 - 24 hours (up to 24 hours) Solution: Cloudy Comments: Human Insulin Isophane Suspension. Cloudy/ milky suspension of human insulin with protamine and zinc. Mixing NPH + Aspart (Novolog ®): Compatible - NovoLog should be drawn into the syringe first. The injection should be made immediately after mixing. NPH + Lispro (Humalog ®): Compatible - Humalog should be drawn into the syringe first. The injection should be made immediately after mixing. NPH +Regular insulin: Always draw the Regular (clear) insulin into the syringe first. Phosphate-buffered insulins ( NPH insulin) should NOT be mixed with lente insulins. Zinc phosphate may precipitate, and the longer-acting insulin will convert to a short-acting insulin to an unpredictable extent. Currently available NPH and short-acting insulin formulations when mixed may be used immediately or stored for future use. NPH HUMAN INSULIN Description Humulin N [Human insulin (rDNA origin) isophane suspension] is a crystalline suspension of human insulin with protamine and zinc providing an intermediate-acting insulin with a slower onset of action and a longer duration of activity (up to 24 hours) than that of Regular human insulin. The time course of action of any insulin may vary considerably in different individuals or at different times in the same individual. As with all insulin preparations, the duration of action of Humulin N is dependent on dose, site of injection, blood supply, temperature, and physical activity. Humulin N is a sterile suspension and is for subcutaneous injection only. It should not be used intravenously or intramuscularly. The concentration of H Continue reading >>

Brand Name Humulin-n Common Name Insulin Nph (insulin Isophane)

Brand Name Humulin-n Common Name Insulin Nph (insulin Isophane)

The content of this page: How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. It takes 1 to 3 hours to begin working after injection, reaches its maximum effect between 5 and 8 hours, and stops working after about 18 to 24 hours. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. How should I use this medication? Your required dose of insulin depends on how much natural insulin your pancreas is producing and how well your body is able to use the insulin. Your doctor or diabetes educator will determine the appropriate dose according to various lifestyle issues and the blood glucose values obtained while monitoring your blood gl Continue reading >>

Nph Insulin

Nph Insulin

NPH insulin, also known as isophane insulin, is an intermediate–acting insulin given to help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.[3] It is used by injection under the skin once to twice a day.[1] Onset of effects is typically in 90 minutes and they last for 24 hours.[3] Versions are available that come premixed with a short–acting insulin, such as regular insulin.[2] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] NPH insulin is made by mixing regular insulin and protamine in exact proportions with zinc and phenol such that a neutral-pH is maintained and crystals form.[1] There are human and pig insulin based versions.[1] Protamine insulin was first created in 1936 and NPH insulin in 1946.[1] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[4] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 2.23 to 10.35 USD per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[5] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds while in the United States this amount costs about 134.00 USD.[2][6] Chemistry[edit] NPH insulin is cloudy and has an onset of 1–4 hours. Its peak is 6–10 hours and its duration is about 10–16 hours. History[edit] Hans Christian Hagedorn (1888–1971) and August Krogh (1874–1949) obtained the rights for insulin from Banting and Best in Toronto, Canada. In 1923 they formed Nordisk Insulin laboratorium, and in 1926 with August Kongsted he obtained a Danish Royal Charter as a non-profit foundation. In 1936, Hagedorn and B. Norman Jensen discovered that the effects of injecte Continue reading >>

Understanding R, N, And Premixed Insulins

Understanding R, N, And Premixed Insulins

Share: Sometimes due to choice, cost, insurance coverage you may find yourself on N, R, or pre-mixed insulin. The following is some information to understand what the types are, how they are taken, and who might be taking them. What is R insulin and when should I take it? Regular or R insulin is clear in color, considered short acting, and is available in names including: Humulin R, Novolin R, ReliOn R. This insulin starts working in 30 minutes and lasts for about 5-8 hours. Regular insulin is taken 30 minutes before meals. It helps to provide coverage for your meals. If you use in combination with N insulin, you would take it before breakfast and dinner. If skipping a meal, you would skip your R insulin. How much is R insulin? R insulin is considerably cheaper than rapid acting analogs such as Humalog or Novolog. Check with your pharmacy for exact pricing. What is N insulin and when should I take it? NPH (N) is a cloudy colored, intermediate acting insulin, and is available as Humulin N, Novolin N, ReliOn N. It starts working in about 1-3 hours, and can last for approximately 10-18 hours. N insulin helps to cover in between your meals and the N you take at breakfast will still be working at lunch to cover your meal. It is essential that you have lunch every day, about 4-5 hours after you inject your N at breakfast. If you do not have lunch, you will be at risk for going too low. The N you take at bed will work during the night to help regular your morning glucose levels. You should have a small bed time snack. NPH or N insulin would be taken with breakfast and before bed for better fasting glucose levels, however instead of giving it at bed, it may be given before dinner also. How much is N insulin? N insulin is a cheaper alternative to longer acting insulins. Check wi Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin - Topic Overview

Types Of Insulin - Topic Overview

Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting Apidra (insulin glulisine) Clear 5-15 minutes 30-60 minutes 3-5 hours Humalog (insulin lispro) Clear 5-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 3-5 hours NovoLog (insulin aspart) Clear 5-15 minutes 40-50 minutes 3-5 hours Afrezza (insulin human, inhaled) Contained in a cartridge 10-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 2½-3 hours Short-acting Humulin R, Novolin R (insulin regular) Clear 30 minutes 1½-2 hours 6-8 hours Intermediate-acting Humulin N, Novolin N (insulin NPH) Cloudy 1-4 hours 4-12 hours 14-24 hours Long-acting Lantus (insulin glargine) Clear 1-2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Levemir (insulin detemir) Clear 2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by the human pancreas. It quickly Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

HUMULIN® N (human insulin [rDNA origin]) isophane) Suspension DESCRIPTION HUMULIN N (human insulin [rDNA origin] isophane) suspension is a human insulin suspension. Human insulin is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. HUMULIN N is a suspension of crystals produced from combining human insulin and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. The amino acid sequence of HUMULIN N is identical to human insulin and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 with a molecular weight of 5808. HUMULIN N is a sterile white suspension. Each milliliter of HUMULIN N contains 100 units of insulin human, 0.35 mg of protamine sulfate, 16 mg of glycerin, 3.78 mg of dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.6 mg of metacresol, 0.65 mg of phenol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, and Water for Injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.5. Sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. Continue reading >>

Nph (humulin N, Novolin N )

Nph (humulin N, Novolin N )

What are the Actions of NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N )? Stimulates uptake of glucose into muscle and fat cells, inhibits production of glucose in the liver, prevents breakdown of fat and protein Route Onset Peak Duration Subcutaneous 1-2 hr 4-12hr 18-24hr Date Modified - Jun 10, 2016 Continue reading >>

Humulin Versus Novolin Nph Insulin: Are They Bioequivalent?

Humulin Versus Novolin Nph Insulin: Are They Bioequivalent?

Recently, several of my diabetic dog owners have asked if they can switch their NPH brand to Walmart's Relion/Novolin insulin to replace the Humulin N insulin that they are now using. It turns out that the Walmart ReliOn brand of NPH is much cheaper (only $25 per vial). Though the two insulins both seem to be NPH insulin, I have some concerns about this change. Any concerns with the ReliOn brand or in switching from Humulin N to Novolin N insulin? My Response: In theory, you'd think that Humulin N (Eli Lilly) and Novolin N (Novo Nordisk) would be bioequivalent (and therefore interchangeable), as they're just different brands of NPH insulin. However, that is not always the case. Humulin N and Novolin N are made using different ingredients and manufacturing techniques, so they are not identical (1,2). Like you noted, Walmart sells NPH insulin as the Novolin/ReliOn brand for much less than most other pharmacies do, at only about $25 per vial (3). A number of dogs have now been reported where they were stable and doing well on Humulin N. However, when switched to the same dose of Novolin N, their diabetic state was no longer regulated and the dogs developed signs of either hypo- or hyperglycemia, requiring significant dose adjustments (4). Bottom Line: Most dogs will respond well to the Novolin/ReliOn brand of insulin, which is indeed much less expensive than most other brands of NPH insulin. However, we cannot just assume that the two insulin preparations would be equivalent. I would not recommend switching from one insulin to the other without close monitoring (including blood glucose curves) so that the dose can be adjusted as needed. References: Continue reading >>

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Intermediate-acting Human Insulins and Analogs Intermediate-acting insulin with a longer onset and duration of activity when compared to regular insulin; hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein; usually requires >= 2 injections/day when used as a basal insulin. Humulin N/Novolin N Subcutaneous Inj Susp: 1mL, 100U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus or for type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately managed by diet, exercise, and oral hypoglycemics. NOTE: A consensus algorithm issued by the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes lists basal or intermediate-acting insulin as a second line or third line agent in patients with type 2 diabetes not controlled on oral drugs; metformin is the initial recommended therapy in all type 2 diabetics without contraindications. Once insulin is added, therapy can be intensified (e.g., addition of prandial insulin) to achieve optimal glycemic control. In patients who are receiving a sulfonylurea, the sulfonylurea should be discontinued when insulin therapy is initiated. The total daily dose is given as 1 to 2 injections per day, given 30 to 60 minutes before a meal or bedtime. Some patients may initially be given a single daily dose 30 to 60 minutes before breakfast, but 24-hour blood glucose control may not be possible with this regimen. Thus, a second injection given 30 to 60 minutes before dinner or bedtime may be required. When oral agents are used concomitantly in type 2 DM, a low initial dose of NPH insulin (e.g., 10 units) is often given in the evening. When used for intensive insulin therapy, NPH insulin is frequently mixed with a quick-acting insulin and given twice daily, although some patients w Continue reading >>

Humulin N (insulin Isophane Aka Insulin Nph)

Humulin N (insulin Isophane Aka Insulin Nph)

Humulin N is one brand of the man-made form of insulin known as insulin NPH or insulin isophane. It is produced by Eli Lilly and Company using recombinant DNA technology from a non-pathological strain of E. coli. It combines human insulin with protamine sulfate to create a crystalline suspension. Humulin N is used to help lower blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Humulin N is one of the few insulins available without a prescription in some states (although you must ask for it at the pharmacy counter, since it has to stay refrigerated). How Does Humulin N Work? Humulin N is an intermediate-acting insulin, which begins to take effect between one and four hours after injection. Its peak effect occurs four to 12 hours after injection and keeps working for 12 to 18 hours after injection. For some people, it can take 24 hours to clear out of their system. Humulin N acts like your body’s natural insulin to lower or normalize your blood sugar levels. It is often used in conjunction with a short-acting insulin and/or other oral anti-diabetic medications (such as Metformin). This insulin can also be mixed with certain other insulins, such as regular insulin. Consult with your doctor on whether mixing insulins is right for you. They can also instruct you on the correct way to do so. Humulin N can be used to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes. Who Should Not Take Humulin N? Do not take Humulin N if you are experiencing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Do not take Humulin N if you are allergic to insulin isophane or any of its ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. It may also contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. If your doctor prescribes Humulin N, you will inject Continue reading >>

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