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Humulin N Classification

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

What you need to know If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. Rapid-acting insulin What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Short-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. Intermediate-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about Continue reading >>

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Intermediate-acting Human Insulins and Analogs Intermediate-acting insulin with a longer onset and duration of activity when compared to regular insulin; hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein; usually requires >= 2 injections/day when used as a basal insulin. Humulin N/Novolin N Subcutaneous Inj Susp: 1mL, 100U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus or for type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately managed by diet, exercise, and oral hypoglycemics. NOTE: A consensus algorithm issued by the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes lists basal or intermediate-acting insulin as a second line or third line agent in patients with type 2 diabetes not controlled on oral drugs; metformin is the initial recommended therapy in all type 2 diabetics without contraindications. Once insulin is added, therapy can be intensified (e.g., addition of prandial insulin) to achieve optimal glycemic control. In patients who are receiving a sulfonylurea, the sulfonylurea should be discontinued when insulin therapy is initiated. The total daily dose is given as 1 to 2 injections per day, given 30 to 60 minutes before a meal or bedtime. Some patients may initially be given a single daily dose 30 to 60 minutes before breakfast, but 24-hour blood glucose control may not be possible with this regimen. Thus, a second injection given 30 to 60 minutes before dinner or bedtime may be required. When oral agents are used concomitantly in type 2 DM, a low initial dose of NPH insulin (e.g., 10 units) is often given in the evening. When used for intensive insulin therapy, NPH insulin is frequently mixed with a quick-acting insulin and given twice daily, although some patients w Continue reading >>

Insulin, Isophane (nph)

Insulin, Isophane (nph)

INSULIN, ISOPHANE (NPH) (in'su-lin) Humulin N, Insulatard NPH, Mixtard, Novolin 70/30, Novolin N Classifications: hormone and synthetic substitute; antidiabetic agent; intermediate acting insulin Prototype: Insulin Pregnancy Category: B 100 units/mL Intermediate-acting, cloudy suspension of zinc insulin crystals modified by protamine in a neutral buffer. NPH Iletin II (pork), and Insulatard NPH are "purified" or "single component" insulins that have been purified and are less likely to cause allergic reactions than nonpurified preparations. Lowers blood glucose levels by increasing peripheral glucose uptake, especially by skeletal muscle and fat tissue, and by inhibiting the liver from changing glycogen to glucose. Therapeutic effect controls postprandial hyperglycemia, usually without supplemental doses of insulin injection. Used to control hyperglycemia in the diabetic patient. Mixtard and Novolin 70/30 are fixed combinations of purified regular insulin 30% and NPH 70%. During episodes of hypoglycemia or in patients sensitive to any ingredient in the formulation. In insulin resistant patients, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism; lactation, older adults, pregnancy (category B), renal or hepatic impairment. Safety and efficacy in children <3 y are not established. Subcutaneous Give isophane insulin 30 min before first meal of the day. If necessary, a second smaller dose may be prescribed 30 min before supper or at bedtime. Ensure complete dispersion by mixing thoroughly by gently rotating vial between palms and inverting it end to end several times. Do not shake. Do NOT mix insulins unless prescribed by physician. In general, when insulin injection (regular insulin) is to be combined, it is drawn first. Note: Isophane insulin may be mixed with insulin injection without a Continue reading >>

Humulin-n

Humulin-n

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. It takes 1 to 3 hours to begin working after injection, reaches its maximum effect between 5 and 8 hours, and stops working after about 18 to 24 hours. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. May contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. Cartridge/KwikPen Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Human Insulin

Human Insulin

Tweet Human insulin is the name which describes synthetic insulin which is laboratory grown to mimic the insulin in humans. Human insulin was developed through the 1960s and 1970s and approved for pharmaceutical use in 1982. Before human insulin was developed animal insulin, usually a purified form of porcine (pork) insulin, was used. How is human insulin produced? Human insulin is laboratory created by growing insulin proteins within E-coli bacteria (Escherichia coli). What types of human insulin are available? Human insulin is available in two forms, a short acting (regular) form and an intermediate acting (NPH) form. NPH (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn) insulin, also known as isophane insulin, is a suspension meaning that the insulin vial should be rolled or repeatedly turned upside down to ensure the solution is uniformly cloudy. Some examples of human insulin: Regular (short acting): Humulin S, Actrapid, Insuman Rapid NPH (intermediate acting): Humulin I, Insuman basal, Insulatard Premixed human insulins: Humulin M2, M3 and M5, Insuman Comb 15, 25 and 50 What are premixed human insulins? Premixed insulins consist of a mix of regular and NPH insulin. The premixed insulins are available in a number of different ratios of mixing. For example Humulin M3 is a mix of 30% short acting to 70% intermediate whereas Humulin M5 is made up of 50% of both short and intermediate acting. In recent years there has been a trend to replace human insulins with newer premixed analogue insulins. How quickly do human insulins act? Short acting (regular) insulin starts to act from about 30 minutes after injecting, with their peak action occurring between 2 and 3 hours after injecting. The duration is up to 10 hours. Intermediate acting (NPH) insulin takes about 2 to 4 hours to start acting, h Continue reading >>

Changing Insulin Brands May Disrupt Diabetics

Changing Insulin Brands May Disrupt Diabetics

For nearly three years after a miniature pinscher named Ditty was diagnosed with diabetes, his owner successfully managed his blood-sugar levels by giving him regular shots of insulin. Then Ditty abruptly turned hypoglycemic. His owner brought the shaky, unsteady dog to his veterinary clinic in Poland, Maine. Dr. Derralyn Rennix quizzed Ditty’s owner about what might have changed in the dog’s daily routine. Different food? More exercise? That’s when the owner remembered: A week or two earlier, the Wal-Mart pharmacy where she purchased Ditty’s insulin had switched his brand of medication because of changes in pricing. “She was told by the pharmacist that they were the same,” Rennix told the VIN News Service. “...They switched — without calling us, without asking us, without telling us, they just told the owner it was the same.” The idea that different brands of the same type of insulin are readily interchangeable isn’t unusual. It’s a common understanding in the medical community. But while it may be true for most human diabetics, switching brands seems to spell trouble for some veterinary patients. On the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), an online community for the profession, numerous practitioners around the country have reported in recent months cases of dogs whose insulin brands were switched developing out-of-control blood glucose levels, a potentially life-threatening condition that can be expensive to remedy. Dr. Sherri Wilson, an internal medicine consultant at VIN, called the information “an eye-opener.” On a message board discussion in which multiple colleagues described cases of dysregulation, Wilson commented, “It has really changed how I think about this brand change ...” Asked about its policies and practices in substitut Continue reading >>

Humulin Classification

Humulin Classification

Humulin N (insulin isophane) is a manmade form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is an intermediateacting insulin that starts to work within 2 to 4 hours after injection, peaks in 4 to 12 hours, and keeps working for 12 to 18 hours. Diabetes Insulin Classification. Good control of blood glucose levels is always important for your health. Humulin; Hypurin Neutral (bovine. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar. This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states. It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels. Summary of insulin classification. Ultra short acting Immediate onset Duration up to 4 hours Peak action 60 minutes. Insulin is required by the cells of the body in order for them to remove and use glucose from the blood. Cells use glucose to produce energy that they need to carry out their functions. Researchers first gave an active extract of the pancreas containing insulin to a young diabetic patient in 1922, and the FDA first approved insulin in 1939. NPH insulin (isophane insulin suspension) answers are found in the Davis's Drug Guide powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, iPad, Android, and. Humulin 5050 (Injection) Medication Classification. Humulin 5050 (Injection) Brandname. Humulin 5050 (Injection) is used for the Treatment. Insulin Human Isophane (NPH), Insulin Human Regular Treats diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes). Insulin is a hormone that helps get sugar from the blood to the muscles, where it is used for energy. Humulin R U100 is a polypeptide hormone Continue reading >>

Basal Insulins (intermediate And Long-acting)

Basal Insulins (intermediate And Long-acting)

Who? Intermediate- and long-acting (basal) insulins are recommended for patients with type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. They may also be used in other types of diabetes (i.e. steroid-induced). Persons with type 1 diabetes generally use intermediate-acting insulin or long-acting insulin in conjunction with regular or rapid acting insulin. Persons with type 2 diabetes may use intermediate or long-acting insulins in conjunction with regular or rapid acting insulins or with oral medications. What? Injections given under the skin. Not suitable for insulin pumps. These medications can be injected with a traditional syringe and needle, or with a disposable pen that has been prefilled with insulin. Most patients tend to prefer pens though while convenient, they can be more expensive. The most common type of intermediate-acting insulin is: NPH (marketed as Humulin N and the Humulin N Pen) NPH (marketed as Novolin N and the Novolin N FlexPen) Long-acting insulins are marketed as different brands. The common ones are: Glargine (marketed as Lantus and the Solo Star Pen) Detemir (marketed as Levemir and the FlexPen) Degludec (marketed as Tresiba and the FlexTouch Pen) Where? These medicines are injected into the tissue under the skin and are slowly released into the body. These insulins allow glucose from the bloodstream to enter the cells in the body so that glucose can be used as energy. They also reduce glucose release into the bloodstream. When? NPH is usually injected twice a day. It begins working 1-3 hours after injection, and is most effective between 4-10 hours of injection. It generally keeps working for 10-16 hours. Detemir can be used once or twice a day. It begins working a few hours after injection and generally keeps working for anywhere from 20-24 hours. Glarg Continue reading >>

Drug Study For Nurses

Drug Study For Nurses

Increase glucose transport across muscle and fat cell membranes to reduce blood glucose level. Promotes conversion of glucose to its storage form, glycogen; triggers amino acid uptake and conversion to protein in muscle cells and inhibits protein degradation; stimulates triglyceride formation and inhibits r3elease of free fatty acids from adipose tissue; and stimulates lipoprotein lipase activity, which converts circulating lipoproteins to fatty acids. Diabetic ketoacidosis, Type I diabetes, adjunct to type II diabetes inadequately controlled by diet and oral antidiabetic agents. Uncommon: urticaria, pruritus, swelling, redness, stinging, warmth at injection site, hypersensitivity reactions Life-threatening: anaphylaxis, hypoglycemia Dosage is always expressed in USP units. remember to use only the syringes calibrated for the particular concentration of insulin administered Be aware that some patients may develop insulin resistance and require large insulin doses to control symptoms of diabetes. To mix insulin suspension, swirl vial gently or rotate between palms or between palm and thigh. dont shake vigorously: this causes bubbling and air in syringe Know that lente, semilente, and ultralente insulins may be mixed in any proportion. Regular insulin may be mixed with NPH or lente insulins in any proportion. When mixing regular insulin with intermediate or long acting insulin, always draw up regular insulin into syringe first. Note that switching from separate injections to a prepared mixture may alter patient response. Whenever NPH or lente in mixed with regular insulin in the same syringe, give it immediately to avoid loss of potency. dont use insulin that changes color or becomes clumped or granular in appearance check expiration date on vial before using contents Kn Continue reading >>

Drug Information | Health And Community Services

Drug Information | Health And Community Services

This is the name under which the drug product is marketed. This refers to the amount of the active (medicinal) ingredient (e.g., 50mg, 10 mg/5 mL). A Drug Identification Number (DIN) is an eight digit number assigned by Health Canada to a drug product prior to being marketed in Canada. It uniquely identifies all drug products sold in a dosage form in Canada and is located on the label of prescription and over-the-counter drug products that have been evaluated and authorized for sale in Canada. A DIN uniquely identifies the following product characteristics: manufacturer; product name; active ingredient(s); strength(s) of active ingredient(s); pharmaceutical form; route of administration. The pharmaceutical dosage form is the form of presentation in which the product is supplied for example (e.g.) tablet, capsule, powder, etc.. Open - Drugs which are reimbursed with no criteria or prior approval. Note: a drug may have limitations that restrict usage. Special Authorization - Drugs which are only eligible for reimbursement when a Beneficiary meets specific criteria recommended by the Atlantic Common Drug Review (ACDR), the National Common Drug Review (CDR) or the Joint Oncology Drug Review (JODR) Committees. Drugs which are restricted to those individuals who meet the defined restriction requirements. Eg. Limitation based on age such as children under 12 years of age. Pricing for the Newfoundland and Labrador Prescription Drug Program is based upon Defined Cost which is the current published manufacturers list price for a drug plus 8.5% (unless otherwise specified). Package SizeNLPDP List Price Per Unit Interchangeable drug products means pharmaceutical equivalents or pharmaceutical alternatives that are the therapeutic equivalents of and that have the same route of admin Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

Generic Name: insulin isophane (IN soo lin EYE soe fane) Brand Names: HumuLIN N, HumuLIN N KwikPen, NovoLIN N, Relion NovoLIN N What is Humulin N? Humulin N (insulin isophane) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is an intermediate-acting insulin that starts to work within 2 to 4 hours after injection, peaks in 4 to 12 hours, and keeps working for 12 to 18 hours. Humulin N is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humulin N may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important information Do not use Humulin N if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of Humulin N. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, hunger, sweating, pale skin, irritability, dizziness, feeling shaky, or trouble concentrating. Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humulin N if you are allergic to insulin isophane, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Do not give Humulin N to a child without a doctor's advice. To make sure Humulin N is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using Continue reading >>

Regular Insulin

Regular Insulin

Regular insulin, also known as neutral insulin and soluble insulin is a type of short acting insulin.[1] It is used to treat diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[1] Onset of effect is typically in 30 minutes and they last for 8 hours.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Regular insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[1] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[1] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[5] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[6] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 2.39 to 10.61 USD per 1,000 iu of regular insulin.[7] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while in the United States this amount is about 134.00 USD.[1][8] Versions are also available mixed with longer–acting versions of insulin, such as NPH insulin.[1] Medical uses[edit] It is used for the long term management of diabetes.[3] Regular insulin is the treatment of choice for the two diabetic emergencies diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It may also be used in combination with glucose to lower potassium leve Continue reading >>

Humulin N Nph U-100 Insulin (isophane Susp) Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Humulin N Nph U-100 Insulin (isophane Susp) Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Insulin isophane is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . This man-made insulin product is the same as human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It is an intermediate-acting insulin (isophane). It starts to work more slowly but lasts longer than regular insulin. Insulin isophane works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin isophane is often used in combination with a shorter-acting insulin. It may also be used alone or with other oral diabetes drugs (such as metformin ). Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using insulin isophane and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, gently roll the vial or cartridge, turning it upside down and right side up 10 times to mix the medication . Do not shake the container. Check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin . Insulin isophane should look evenly cloudy/milky after mixing. Do not use if you see clumps of white material, a "frosty" appearance, or particles stuck to the sides of the vial or cartridge. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin Continue reading >>

Insulin Nph (otc)

Insulin Nph (otc)

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Suggested guidelines for beginning dose: 0.2 unit/kg/day Dosing Considerations Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Blood sugar patterns (>3 days) Look for consistent pattern in blood sugars for >3 days For the same time each day: Compare blood glucose level For each time of day: Calculate blood glucose range Calculate median blood glucose Consider eating and activity patterns during day Blood glucose adjustments Adjust only 1 insulin dose at a time Correct hypoglycemia first Correct highest blood sugars next If all blood sugars are high (within 2.75 mmol/L [50 mg/dL]): Correct morning fasting blood glucose first Change insulin doses in small increments: Type 1 diabetes (1-2 unit change); type 2 diabetes (2-3 unit change) Many sliding scales exist to determine exact insulin dose based on frequent blood glucose monitoring Commonly written for q4hr blood glucose test Sliding scale coverage usually begins after blood glucose >11 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) If coverage is needed q4hr x 24 hr, then base insulin dose is adjusted first; sliding scale doses may be adjusted upwards as well Continue reading >>

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