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Humulin N Administration

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Intermediate-acting Human Insulins and Analogs Intermediate-acting insulin with a longer onset and duration of activity when compared to regular insulin; hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein; usually requires >= 2 injections/day when used as a basal insulin. Humulin N/Novolin N Subcutaneous Inj Susp: 1mL, 100U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus or for type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately managed by diet, exercise, and oral hypoglycemics. NOTE: A consensus algorithm issued by the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes lists basal or intermediate-acting insulin as a second line or third line agent in patients with type 2 diabetes not controlled on oral drugs; metformin is the initial recommended therapy in all type 2 diabetics without contraindications. Once insulin is added, therapy can be intensified (e.g., addition of prandial insulin) to achieve optimal glycemic control. In patients who are receiving a sulfonylurea, the sulfonylurea should be discontinued when insulin therapy is initiated. The total daily dose is given as 1 to 2 injections per day, given 30 to 60 minutes before a meal or bedtime. Some patients may initially be given a single daily dose 30 to 60 minutes before breakfast, but 24-hour blood glucose control may not be possible with this regimen. Thus, a second injection given 30 to 60 minutes before dinner or bedtime may be required. When oral agents are used concomitantly in type 2 DM, a low initial dose of NPH insulin (e.g., 10 units) is often given in the evening. When used for intensive insulin therapy, NPH insulin is frequently mixed with a quick-acting insulin and given twice daily, although some patients w Continue reading >>

Humulin N Dosage

Humulin N Dosage

Important Administration Instructions Inspect HUMULIN N visually before use. It should not contain particulate matter and should appear uniformly cloudy after mixing. Do not use HUMULIN N if particulate matter is seen. Route of Administration HUMULIN N should only be administered subcutaneously. Administer in the subcutaneous tissue of the abdominal wall, thigh, upper arm, or buttocks. To reduce the risk of lipodystrophy, rotate the injection site within the same region from one injection to the next [see Adverse Reactions (6)]. Do not administer HUMULIN N intravenously or intramuscularly and do not use HUMULIN N in an insulin infusion pump. Dosage Information Individualize and adjust the dosage of HUMULIN N based on the individual's metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Dosage adjustments may be needed with changes in physical activity, changes in meal patterns (i.e., macronutrient content or timing of food intake), changes in renal or hepatic function or during acute illness [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2, 5.3), and Use in Specific Populations (8.6, 8.7)]. Dosage Adjustment due to Drug Interactions Dosage adjustment may be needed when HUMULIN N is coadministered with certain drugs [see Drug Interactions (7)]. Dosage adjustment may be needed when switching from another insulin to HUMULIN N [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Instructions for Mixing with Other Insulins HUMULIN N may be used with a prandial insulin if indicated. HUMULIN N may be mixed with HUMULIN R or HUMALOG before injection. If HUMULIN N is mixed with HUMULIN R, HUMULIN R should be drawn into the syringe first. Injection should occur immediately after mixing. If HUMULIN N is mixed with HUMALOG, HUMALOG should be drawn into the syringe first. Injection shoul Continue reading >>

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

Learn how to mix insulin clear to cloudy. Drawing up and mixing insulin is a skill that nurses will utilize on the job. Insulin is administered to patients who have diabetes. These type of patients depend on insulin so their body can use glucose. Therefore, nurses must be familiar with how to mix insulin. The goal of this article is to teach you how to mix insulin. Below are a video demonstration and step-by-step instructions on how to do this. How to Mix Insulin Purpose of mixing insulin: To prevent having to give the patient two separate injections (hence better for the patient). Most commonly ordered insulin that are mixed: NPH (intermediate-acting) and Regular insulin (short-acting). Important Points to Keep in Mind: Never mix Insulin Glargine “Lantus” with any other type of insulin. Administer the dose within 5 to 10 minutes after drawing up because the regular insulin binds to the NPH and this decreases its action. Check the patient’s blood sugar and for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia to ensure they aren’t hypoglycemic …if patient is hypoglycemic hold the dose and notify md for further orders. Key Concept for Mixing Insulin: Draw up CLEAR TO CLOUDY Remember the mnemonic: RN (Regular to Nph) Why? It prevents contaminating the vial of clear insulin with the cloudy insulin because if contaminated it can affect the action of the insulin. Why does this matter because they will be mixed in the syringe? You have 5 to 10 minutes to give the insulin mixed in the syringe before the action of the insulins are affected Demonstration on Drawing Up Clear to Cloudy Insulin Steps on How to Mix Insulin 1. Check the doctor’s order and that you have the correct medication: Doctor’s order says: “10 units of Humulin R and 12 units of Humulin N subcutaneous before b Continue reading >>

Nph Insulin

Nph Insulin

NPH insulin, also known as isophane insulin, is an intermediate–acting insulin given to help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.[3] It is used by injection under the skin once to twice a day.[1] Onset of effects is typically in 90 minutes and they last for 24 hours.[3] Versions are available that come premixed with a short–acting insulin, such as regular insulin.[2] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] NPH insulin is made by mixing regular insulin and protamine in exact proportions with zinc and phenol such that a neutral-pH is maintained and crystals form.[1] There are human and pig insulin based versions.[1] Protamine insulin was first created in 1936 and NPH insulin in 1946.[1] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[4] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 2.23 to 10.35 USD per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[5] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds while in the United States this amount costs about 134.00 USD.[2][6] Chemistry[edit] NPH insulin is cloudy and has an onset of 1–4 hours. Its peak is 6–10 hours and its duration is about 10–16 hours. History[edit] Hans Christian Hagedorn (1888–1971) and August Krogh (1874–1949) obtained the rights for insulin from Banting and Best in Toronto, Canada. In 1923 they formed Nordisk Insulin laboratorium, and in 1926 with August Kongsted he obtained a Danish Royal Charter as a non-profit foundation. In 1936, Hagedorn and B. Norman Jensen discovered that the effects of injecte Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

Generic Name: insulin human Dosage Form: injection, suspension Indications and Usage for Humulin N HUMULIN N is an intermediate-acting recombinant human insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with diabetes mellitus. Humulin N Dosage and Administration Important Administration Instructions Inspect HUMULIN N visually before use. It should not contain particulate matter and should appear uniformly cloudy after mixing. Do not use HUMULIN N if particulate matter is seen. Route of Administration HUMULIN N should only be administered subcutaneously. Administer in the subcutaneous tissue of the abdominal wall, thigh, upper arm, or buttocks. To reduce the risk of lipodystrophy, rotate the injection site within the same region from one injection to the next [see Adverse Reactions (6)]. Do not administer HUMULIN N intravenously or intramuscularly and do not use HUMULIN N in an insulin infusion pump. Dosage Information Individualize and adjust the dosage of HUMULIN N based on the individual's metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Dosage adjustments may be needed with changes in physical activity, changes in meal patterns (i.e., macronutrient content or timing of food intake), changes in renal or hepatic function or during acute illness [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2, 5.3), and Use in Specific Populations (8.6, 8.7)]. Dosage Adjustment due to Drug Interactions Dosage adjustment may be needed when HUMULIN N is coadministered with certain drugs [see Drug Interactions (7)]. Dosage adjustment may be needed when switching from another insulin to HUMULIN N [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Instructions for Mixing with Other Insulins HUMULIN N may be used with a prandial insulin if indicated. HUMULIN N m Continue reading >>

Humulin-n Overview

Humulin-n Overview

Insulin (human) is a prescription medication used to control hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) in patients with diabetes mellitus. Insulin (human) is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps move sugar from the blood into other tissues that use it for energy. This medication comes in solution and suspension for injection and inhalational forms. The dose and frequency of administration will depend on many factors, including diet, lifestyle, and other conditions you have. The most common side effect of insulin (human) is hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Hypoglycemia related to insulin can also cause dizziness, drowsiness, and blurred vision. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how insulin (human) affects you. Insulin (human) is a prescription medication used to control hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) in patients with diabetes mellitus. Inhalational: Inhalational formulations are administered immediately before meals. Injectable: Injectable formulations are administered several times daily, depending on your condition and meal times. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Continue reading >>

Beginner’s Insulin Administration Guide For Dogs

Beginner’s Insulin Administration Guide For Dogs

INSULIN ADMINISTRATION GUIDE THE INSULIN Insulin is the injectable medication you will be using to control your diabetic dog’s blood sugar. As insulin therapy is started, the optimal dose for your pet is unknown and will have to be determined by trial and error. Most dogs will need insulin injections twice a day, though occasionally a patient is found where a single dose is very long acting and once-a-day insulin works out. A dose will be selected based on what research has shown to be a good starting point, and after a couple of weeks your dog will return for a glucose “curve” where blood sugar levels will be mapped out over the course of a 10-24 hour period. The curve will show if the insulin is lasting long enough and if the dose should be raised, lowered, or kept the same. Alternatively, you can learn how to monitor your dog’s blood glucose levels yourself (click here for more information) but if you are a beginner you may want to master giving the injections before moving on to actually taking blood samples. There are two commonly used insulins for dogs: Vetsulin®, which is of pork origin (pork and dog insulin are molecularly identical so essentially Vetsulin is canine insulin) and Humulin N, which is human insulin (produced through genetic engineering technology). There are other types of insulins but as these are rarely used in dogs, probably will not come up except for special circumstances so they are omitted from this discussion. Vetsulin is available through your veterinarian’s office or through veterinary pharmacies while Humulin N is available through any regular pharmacy. BE SURE YOU UNDERSTAND HOW MUCH INSULIN YOU ARE SUPPOSED TO GIVE YOUR PET. DO NOT ADJUST YOUR PET’S INSULIN DOSE WITHOUT VETERINARY GUIDANCE. STORING INSULIN The bottle you a Continue reading >>

Buy Humulin N (nph Insulin) Vials Online

Buy Humulin N (nph Insulin) Vials Online

Humulin N (NPH Insulin) Vials 100 U/mL 10 mL QTY TYPE PRICE COST PER UNIT 1 10 ML $77.31 $77.31 2 10 ML $111.08 $55.54 3 10 ML $147.48 $49.16 4 10 ML $183.84 $45.96 5 10 ML $220.25 $44.05 6 10 ML $256.62 $42.77 7 10 ML $293.02 $41.86 8 10 ML $329.38 $41.17 9 10 ML $365.76 $40.64 10 10 ML $402.20 $40.22 VIEW ALL INSULIN PRODUCTS PLACE A NEW INSULIN ORDER What are Humulin N vials? Humulin N vials are vials filled with Humulin-N, which is the trade name of insulin isophane, otherwise known as NPH insulin, which is used to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. It has been produced through genetic engineering, and is different from animal source insulin because it is structurally identical to the naturally occurring human insulin produced by your body. It is an intermediate-acting insulin with a slower onset of action than Regular insulin and a longer duration of activity. Humulin-N is a sterile suspension containing insulin isophane for subcutaneous (under the skin) injection. It is available in 10 mL vials. What is it used for? Humulin N is an intermediate-acting insulin administered subcutaneously (under the skin) that is used for the treatment of insulin requiring diabetic patients. How does it work? Humulin N is the brand name of insulin isophane, or NPH insulin. This type of insulin is an intermediate-acting insulin, which is sometimes called basal, or background insulin, because it provides a long duration of insulin protection against your blood sugar level fluctuations throughout the entire day. After subcutaneous (under the skin) injection once or twice a day it typically begins to work in 90 minutes and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Humulin-N is structurally identical to naturally occurring human insulin, but it is mixed small proteins called pro Continue reading >>

Humulin N And Pregnancy

Humulin N And Pregnancy

Animal studies on Humulin N (NPH insulin) and pregnancy suggest that the medication is safe for women to use while pregnant. Although it is known that some insulins may cross the placenta, most healthcare providers generally consider Humulin N to be safe for use during pregnancy. If you are taking Humulin N and pregnancy occurs, talk to your healthcare provider (as pregnancy usually affects your insulin requirements). An Overview of Using Humulin N During Pregnancy Humulin N (NPH insulin ) is a non-prescription medication used to treat diabetes . The medication is an intermediate-acting form of insulin, used to control blood sugar throughout the day. Animal studies suggest that Humulin N is safe for women to use while pregnant. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses a pregnancy category system to classify the possible risks to a fetus when a specific medicine is taken during pregnancy. Pregnancy Category B is given to medicines that have not been adequately studied in pregnant humans but do not appear to cause harm to the fetus in animal studies. Although it was originally thought that insulin molecules are too large to cross the placenta, it is now known that some insulins, in some circumstances, may cross the placenta. In general, most healthcare providers consider Humulin N to be safe for use during pregnancy. It is very important for pregnant women with diabetes (including gestational diabetes ) to control their blood sugar, and Humulin N can be useful to help get blood sugar under control. Final Thoughts on Humulin N and Pregnancy If you are pregnant or are thinking of becoming pregnant while taking Humulin N, let your healthcare provider know. He or she will consider the benefits and risks of taking the drug during pregnancy before making a recommendati Continue reading >>

Insulin Administration

Insulin Administration

Subcutaneous Injections: Insulin Carefully select the ordered insulin and syringes. Note that there are many different types of insulin with different rates of onset, peak, and duration of action. Mixing two insulins in one syringe: Humulin R + Humulin N *Note: Different brands and types of insulin may not be able to be mixed in one syringe. For example Lantus has to be administered by itself and cannot be mixed. Roll the vial of Humulin N to mix the contents. Do NOT shake the vial. Withdraw the ordered amount of Humulin R Withdraw the ordered amount of Humulin N Sample: Inject 12 units of air into the Humulin N vial Inject 15 units of air into the Humulin R vial Withdraw 15 units of Humulin R (be very careful to get rid of all the air bubbles) Withdraw 12 units of Humulin N (you will have a total of 27 units in the syringe; 15 + 12 = 27). This dose must be exact. If you draw back beyond the 27 unit mark, you have to start completely over. Note what syringe you are using. The markings vary between syringes. Only insulin syringes are used for administering insulin injections. Rule to Remember: Never contaminate a vial of regular insulin with any other type of insulin, since regular insulin is also used for IV administration. A mneumonic to help you remember the order is: Long Short Short Long Air into the long Air into the short Draw up short Draw up long Cloudy Clear Clear Cloudy Administering Insulin Things to consider before administering insulin: What was the capillary blood sugar level? When will the patient be eating? Site to be used? Type of insulin to be administered. Onset? Duration? Wash hands and don gloves Identify patient Do third medication check Cleanse site with antiseptic swab Grasp skinfold at site (needle needs to be 1/2 the depth of the skinfold top t Continue reading >>

Humulin N (insulin) | Diabetesteam

Humulin N (insulin) | Diabetesteam

213 people have indicated they have taken Humulin N Humulin N is a prescription drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat diabetes in adults and children. Humulin N is also referred to by its drug name, Human insulin [rDNA origin] isophane. Your doctor may prescribe another type of insulin or an oral medication such as Metformin to take along with Humulin N. Humulin N is an intermediate-acting insulin. Prescribing information states that Humulin N should be administered via a subcutaneous injection. Your doctor will explain when and where you should inject Humulin N and how to measure your dosage. Humulin N may be used to control your blood glucose levels between meal... read more Humulin N is a prescription drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat diabetes in adults and children. Humulin N is also referred to by its drug name, Human insulin [rDNA origin] isophane. Your doctor may prescribe another type of insulin or an oral medication such as Metformin to take along with Humulin N. Humulin N is an intermediate-acting insulin. Prescribing information states that Humulin N should be administered via a subcutaneous injection. Your doctor will explain when and where you should inject Humulin N and how to measure your dosage. Humulin N may be used to control your blood glucose levels between meals or overnight. Humulin N comes as a liquid in vials or prefilled pens. The FDA-approved label for Humulin N lists common side effects including hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) and minor redness or irritation at injection sites. Rare but serious side effects listed for Humulin N can include a systemic allergic reaction and heart failure. Continue reading >>

Humulin 30/70/humulin N/humulin R

Humulin 30/70/humulin N/humulin R

Humulin R, Humulin N, Humulin 30/70 vial: For the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus for whom diet and/or oral agents are not sufficient. Humulin R, Humulin N, Humulin 30/70 cartridge: For the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus who require insulin for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Humulin R, Humulin N, Humulin 30/70 vial: Posology: The dosage should be determined by the physician, according to the requirement of the patient. Paediatric population: No data are available. Method of administration: Humulin N and Humulin 30/70 should be given by subcutaneous injection but may, although not recommended, also be given by intramuscular injection. These formulations should not be administered intravenously. Humulin R should be given by subcutaneous injection but may, although not recommended, also be given by intramuscular injection. It may also be administered intravenously. Subcutaneous administration should be in the upper arms, thighs, buttocks or abdomen. Use of injection sites should be rotated so that the same site is not used more than approximately once a month. Care should be taken when injecting any Humulin insulin preparations to ensure that a blood vessel has not been entered. After any insulin injection, the injection site should not be massaged. Patients must be educated to use proper injection techniques. Humulin N may be administered in combination with Humulin R. (See instructions for use and handling for Mixing of Insulins). Humulin 30/70 formulation is a ready-made defined mixture of soluble and isophane insulin designed to avoid the need for the patient to mix insulin preparations. A patient's treatment regimen should be based on their individual metabolic requirements. Humulin R, Humulin N, Humulin 30/70 cartridge: Posology: Continue reading >>

Insulin Nph (otc)

Insulin Nph (otc)

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Suggested guidelines for beginning dose: 0.2 unit/kg/day Dosing Considerations Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Blood sugar patterns (>3 days) Look for consistent pattern in blood sugars for >3 days For the same time each day: Compare blood glucose level For each time of day: Calculate blood glucose range Calculate median blood glucose Consider eating and activity patterns during day Blood glucose adjustments Adjust only 1 insulin dose at a time Correct hypoglycemia first Correct highest blood sugars next If all blood sugars are high (within 2.75 mmol/L [50 mg/dL]): Correct morning fasting blood glucose first Change insulin doses in small increments: Type 1 diabetes (1-2 unit change); type 2 diabetes (2-3 unit change) Many sliding scales exist to determine exact insulin dose based on frequent blood glucose monitoring Commonly written for q4hr blood glucose test Sliding scale coverage usually begins after blood glucose >11 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) If coverage is needed q4hr x 24 hr, then base insulin dose is adjusted first; sliding scale doses may be adjusted upwards as well Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

HUMULIN® N (human insulin [rDNA origin]) isophane) Suspension DESCRIPTION HUMULIN N (human insulin [rDNA origin] isophane) suspension is a human insulin suspension. Human insulin is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. HUMULIN N is a suspension of crystals produced from combining human insulin and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. The amino acid sequence of HUMULIN N is identical to human insulin and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 with a molecular weight of 5808. HUMULIN N is a sterile white suspension. Each milliliter of HUMULIN N contains 100 units of insulin human, 0.35 mg of protamine sulfate, 16 mg of glycerin, 3.78 mg of dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.6 mg of metacresol, 0.65 mg of phenol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, and Water for Injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.5. Sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. Continue reading >>

Humulin (insulin)

Humulin (insulin)

HUMULIN® Lilly Insulin, Human Biosynthetic Antidiabetic Agent Action And Clinical Pharmacology: Humulin is a polypeptide hormone consisting of a 21 amino acid A-chain and a 30 amino acid B-chain linked by two disulfide bonds. Humulin is found to be chemically, physically, biologically and immunologically equivalent to pancreatic human insulin which differs slightly from porcine or bovine insulin in amino acid composition. Studies indicate immunogenicity problems with biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) produced by recombinant DNA technology are less likely than with insulin derived from animal origin. Biosynthetic human insulin is devoid of all protein contaminants of pancreatic origin normally present in trace amounts in all insulins of pancreatic origin. The purification procedures used in the manufacture of biosynthetic human insulin result in a product which contains an insufficient quantity of E. coli polypeptides to be antigenic in deliberately sensitized animals. No antibodies to E. coli polypeptides have been detected in specifically designed radioimmunoassay methods examining patient serum samples. The administration of suitable doses of insulin to patients with diabetes mellitus, along with controlled diet and exercise, temporarily restores their ability to metabolize carbohydrates, fats and proteins; to store glycogen in the liver; and to convert glucose to fat. When given in suitable doses at regular intervals to a patient with diabetes mellitus, the blood sugar is maintained within a reasonable range, the urine remains relatively free of sugar and ketone bodies, and diabetic acidosis and coma are prevented. Insulin preparations differ in onset, peak and duration of action. The addition of protamine to insulin, in the presence of zinc, produces a stable comple Continue reading >>

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