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Humulin 70/30 Vs Humalog 70/30

What Is Premixed Insulin?

What Is Premixed Insulin?

Insulin that comes in pre-mixed formulations combines insulins that have different onsets (how quickly they begin to work) and durations (how long the effects last) to best manage the blood glucose levels of the individual. Rapid-acting insulins work well for the increase in blood glucose that occurs right after meals, while longer-acting insulins help maintain blood glucose levels between meals and overnight. Many patients like pre-mixed insulins as they help reduce the number of injections needed per day, however they are not convenient for intensive insulin regimens. A person with diabetes may need to change their insulin regimen if they experience changes in their physical activity, weight gain or loss, increased stress, illness, or a change in diet. Changes like these should be discussed with a healthcare professional. Always check with your healthcare professional about any potential drug interactions before starting treatment and report any side effects you experience. Some of the long-acting insulins available in the US include: Humalog Mix 50/50 is a mix of 50% of a rapid-acting insulin (insulin lispro) and an intermediate-acting insulin (insulin lispro protamine suspension) used to treat adults with diabetes for the control of blood sugar. The rapid-acting insulin goes to work quickly in about 15 to 30 minutes, stimulating the cells to absorb glucose for their energy needs, while the intermediate acting insulin reaches its peak effect 2 to 4 hours after injection and continues working for up to 22 hours.* In addition to stimulating the absorption of glucose, insulin promotes the storage of glucose in the form of glycogen in the liver, stops the liver from producing more glucose, and promotes the conversion of excess glucose into fat. Humalog Mix 50/50 is avail Continue reading >>

Combination Insulins

Combination Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Novolin® 70/30 - Humulin® 70/30 Novolog® Mix 70/30 Humalog® Mix 75/25 SOLIQUA™ 100/33 (insulin glargine and lixisenatide injection) XULTOPHY® 100/3.6 (insulin degludec and liraglutide injection) --® Onset: 30-60 min Peak: 2-12 hours Duration: 18 - 24 hours Solution: Cloudy Comments: Mixture of 70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection. Recommended interval between dosing and meal initiation: 30 minutes. Mixing You should not attempt to change the ratio of this product by adding additional NPH or Regular insulin to the vial. If the physician has prescribed insulin mixed in a proportion other than 70% NPH and 30% Regular, you should use the separate insulin formulations (e.g. NPH and Regular insulin ) in the amounts recommended by the physician. All Unopened Novolin 70/30: • Keep all unopened Novolin 70/30 in the refrigerator between 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). • Do not freeze. Do not use Novolin 70/30 if it has been frozen. • If refrigeration is not possible, the unopened vial may be kept at room temperature for up to 6 weeks (42 days), as long as it is kept at or below 77°F (25°C). • Keep unopened Novolin 70/30 in the carton to protect from light. Novolin 70/30 in use: Vials • Keep at room temperature below 77°F (25°C) for up to 6 weeks (42 days). • Keep vials away from direct heat or light. • Throw away an opened vial after 6 weeks (42 days) of use, even if there is insulin left in the vial. • Unopened vials can be used until the expiration date on the Novolin 70/30 label, if the medicine has been stored in a refrigerator. Note: double mouse click to return to the top of the page Onset Continue reading >>

Humulin 50/50, Humulin 70/30, Humulin 70/30 Pen, Novolin 70/30, Novolin 70/30 Innolet, Novolin 70/30 Penfill, Relion Novolin 70/30 Innolet, Relion/novolin 70/30 (insulin Isophane And Insulin Regular) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

Humulin 50/50, Humulin 70/30, Humulin 70/30 Pen, Novolin 70/30, Novolin 70/30 Innolet, Novolin 70/30 Penfill, Relion Novolin 70/30 Innolet, Relion/novolin 70/30 (insulin Isophane And Insulin Regular) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

What is insulin isophane and insulin regular (Humulin 50/50, Humulin 70/30, Humulin 70/30 Pen, Novolin 70/30, Novolin 70/30 Innolet, Novolin 70/30 PenFill, Relion Novolin 70/30 Innolet, ReliOn/Novolin 70/30)? Insulin isophane and insulin regular is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane and insulin regular is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made. Insulin isophane and insulin regular is used to treat diabetes . Insulin isophane and insulin regular may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin isophane and insulin regular? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin isophane and insulin regular. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache , nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness , blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin isophane and insulin regular. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important informa Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70/30 Confusion

Novolog Mix 70/30 Confusion

When prescribing NovoLog® Mix 70/30 analog insulin, health care professionals may write an unclear prescription, or if using an EMR system, inadvertently select Novolin® 70/30 human insulin instead. Be on the lookout for these errors. Read on for a breakdown of the key differences between these 2 types of insulin. Before the new “insulin pens” came out, there were four types of insulin: rapid-acting, short-acting, intermediate-acting, and long-acting. When it comes to the pre-mixed insulins, like Novolog 70/30, there are fewer differences between the brands (for example, Novolog versus Novolin)…. Whether contained in a bottle or in a pen, the premixed insulins all contain a combination of both an intermediate-acting insulin and a short-acting insulin. The numbers on the bottle or pen refer to the percentage of each type of insulin contained in the mixture. That means both Novolin 70/30 and Novolog 70/30 contain a mixture that is 70% intermediate-acting insulin with 30% short-acting insulin. However, Novolin 70/30 takes slightly longer to begin working than Novolog 70/30, which has a rapid onset. Both Novolin 70/30 and Novolog 70/30 may last up to 24 hours in the system. Novolin® 70/30 is not available in a pen. Novolin is the brand name given to all human insulins made by Novo Nordisk. Under this brand are specific types of insulin such as regular, nph, and 70/30. Novolog insulin is a synthetic recombinant insulin that is very rapid acting. You may often get this question because novolog is more expensive than any of the novolins. However, they cannot be substituted for each other. Two euglycemic clamp studies assessed glucose utilization after dosing of healthy volunteers. NovoLog Mix 70/30 has an earlier onset of action than human premix 70/30 in studies of n Continue reading >>

Humulin 70-30

Humulin 70-30

HUMULIN® 70/30 (70% human insulin isophane) Suspension and (30% human insulin) Injection, [rDNA origin] DESCRIPTION HUMULIN 70/30 (70% human insulin isophane suspension and 30% human insulin injection [rDNA origin]) is a human insulin suspension. Human insulin is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. HUMULIN 70/30 is a suspension of crystals produced from combining human insulin and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation and mixing with human insulin injection. The amino acid sequence of HUMULIN 70/30 is identical to human insulin and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 with a molecular weight of 5808. HUMULIN 70/30 is a sterile white suspension. Each milliliter of HUMULIN 70/30 contains 100 units of insulin human, 0.24 mg of protamine sulfate, 16 mg of glycerin, 3.78 mg of dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.6 mg of metacresol, 0.65 mg of phenol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, and Water for Injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.8. Sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. For Consumers What are the possible side effects of insulin isophane and insulin regular? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin isophane and insulin regular. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Watch for signs of l Continue reading >>

Humalog 75-25

Humalog 75-25

HUMALOG® Mix75/25™ (75% insulin lispro protamine) Suspension and (25% insulin lispro) Injection, (rDNA origin) 100 Units per ML (U-100) DESCRIPTION Humalog® Mix75/25™ [75% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 25% insulin lispro injection, (rDNA origin)] is a mixture of insulin lispro solution, a rapid-acting blood glucose-lowering agent and insulin lispro protamine suspension, an intermediate-acting blood glucose-lowering agent. Chemically, insulin lispro is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog, created when the amino acids at positions 28 and 29 on the insulin B-chain are reversed. Insulin lispro is synthesized in a special non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli bacteria that has been genetically altered to produce insulin lispro. Insulin lispro protamine suspension (NPL component) is a suspension of crystals produced from combining insulin lispro and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. Insulin lispro has the following primary structure: Insulin lispro has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. Humalog Mix75/25 vials and Pens contain a sterile suspension of insulin lispro protamine suspension mixed with soluble insulin lispro for use as an injection. Each milliliter of Humalog Mix75/25 injection contains insulin lispro 100 units, 0.28 mg protamine sulfate, 16 mg glycerin, 3.78 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.76 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, 0.715 mg phenol, and Water for Injection. Humalog Mix75/25 has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. Hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10% may have been added to adjust pH. Continue reading >>

Humulin R Versus Humalog: A Side-by-side Comparison

Humulin R Versus Humalog: A Side-by-side Comparison

Diabetes is a disease that causes high blood sugar levels. Left untreated, high blood sugar levels can cause many problems, such as heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, and blindness. Humulin R and Humalog are two different types of insulin that can help lower your blood sugar level. These drugs work in slightly different ways. In general, insulin lowers your blood sugar level by signaling to your muscle and fat cells to use sugar from your blood. It also signals your liver to stop making sugar. Depending on the type and severity of your diabetes, you may need to take insulin. We’ll compare and contrast Humulin R and Humalog to help you decide if one may be a good choice to treat your diabetes. Humulin R is a brand name for regular insulin. It is a short-acting insulin. That means that it takes about 30 minutes to reach your bloodstream and works for about three to six hours. Humalog is a brand name for insulin lispro, which is a fast-acting insulin. It takes about 15 minutes to start working, but it only lasts two to four hours. The following table compares more features of these two drugs. Humulin R Humalog What drug is it? Regular insulin (short-acting insulin) Insulin lispro (fast-acting insulin) What’s it used for? Blood sugar control in people with diabetes Blood sugar control in people with diabetes Do I need a prescription to buy this drug? No Yes Is a generic version available? No No What forms does it come in? Injectable solution, available in a vial for use with a syringe Injectable solution, available in a vial for use with a syringe. Injectable solution, available in a cartridge that you use in a device called a KwikPen How much do I take? Your doctor will tell you what dose to inject. This depends on your blood sugar readings and the Continue reading >>

What Is Humulin 70/30 Kwikpen?

What Is Humulin 70/30 Kwikpen?

Before you receive DARZALEX®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: have a history of breathing problems have had shingles (herpes zoster) are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. DARZALEX® may harm your unborn baby. Females who are able to become pregnant should use an effective method of birth control during treatment and for at least 3 months after your final dose of DARZALEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that you can use during this time. are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if DARZALEX® passes into your breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. DARZALEX® may be given alone or together with other medicines used to treat multiple myeloma. Your healthcare provider will decide the time between doses as well as how many treatments you will receive. Your healthcare provider will give you medicines before each dose of DARZALEX® and on the first day after each dose of DARZALEX® to help reduce the risk of infusion reactions. If you miss any appointments, call your healthcare provider as soon as possible to reschedule your appointment. Infusion reactions. Infusion reactions are common with DARZALEX® and can be severe. Your healthcare provider may temporarily stop your infusion or completely stop treatment with DARZALEX® if you have infusion reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms: shortness of breath or trouble breathing dizziness or lightheadedness (hypotension) cough wheezing throat tightness runny or stuffy nose headache itching nausea vomiting chills fever Changes in blood tests. DARZALEX Continue reading >>

Humulin 70/30 Mix And Novolog 70/30 Mix

Humulin 70/30 Mix And Novolog 70/30 Mix

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi to all. Can anyone tell me is Humulin good as Novolog. They're both "good" for what they're intended...but since you posted this in the "complications" section, maybe you could expand a little on what you're actually trying to figure out. Important distinction to keep in mind: you'll see humalog referred to often. I'd say at least 95% of the time this is referring to the bolus only, non-mix version. Humulin also refers to a few different products, and is not always going to be the mix being referred to. But is not such a common insulin these days. As far as how they compare, I don't know of arguments saying one is not "as good" as the other. Here are some details for each, from this link. Continue reading >>

The Abcs Of Insulin

The Abcs Of Insulin

Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin is required to move sugar from the blood into the bodys cells, where it can be used for energy. For the symptoms of high blood sugar and low blood sugar, see Tables 1 and 2. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Only 5% of patients with diabetes have this form of the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is much more common; the risk factors are listed in online table 3. Individuals with T2D make insulin, but their bodies dont respond well to it, a condition known as insulin resistance. Treatment of T2D usually begins with dietary and lifestyle changes, as well as oral medications. Over time, as the pancreas struggles to make an adequate amount of insulin to overcome insulin resistance, patients may require insulin supplementation. Insulin therapy must be individualized and balanced with meal planning and exercise. When a patient begins using insulin to manage diabetes, the initial dose is just a starting point. Over time, insulin requirements are affected by factors such as weight gain or loss, changes in eating habits, and the addition of other medications. The need for insulin often increases, and the dose must be readjusted to meet the new requirements. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, meaning not very deep under the skin. Common injection sites include the stomach, buttocks, thighs, and upper arms. By rotating the site of injection, patients can avoid lipohypertrophy, a slight increase in the growth or size of fat cells under the skin. When lipohypertrophy occurs, a soft pillowy growth may form at the repeated-use injection site. Therefore, for reliable absorption rates and cosmetic purpo Continue reading >>

Humulin70/30, Novolin 70/30 (insulin Isophane Human/insulin Regular Human) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Humulin70/30, Novolin 70/30 (insulin Isophane Human/insulin Regular Human) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

insulin isophane human/insulin regular human Ketones moderate or less: 0.5 U/kg/day SC Typically, 50-75% of total daily dose is given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin May use this combination product if the dosage ratio of NPH (isophane) to regular is 2:1 Suggested guidelines for beginning dose; adjust according to blood glucose levels Initial dose: 0.5-1 units/kg/day in divided doses Typically, 50-75% of total daily dose is given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin May use this combination product if the dosage ratio of NPH (isophane) to regular is 2:1 Ratio of regular insulin to NPH (isophane) insulin 1:2 Administer within 15 min before a meal or immediately after a meal Store unopened vials/pens refrigerated; do not freeze Opened (in-use) product may be stored at ambient room temperature (below 86F [30C]) and away from heat and light Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing (See Dosage Adjustment Strategies) Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Look for consistent pattern in blood sugars for >3 days Compare blood glucose for same time each day For each time of day: calculate blood glucose range Consider eating and activity patterns during day If all blood sugars are high (within 2.75 mmol/L [50 mg/dL]): correct morning fasting blood glucose 1st Many sliding scales exist to determine exact insulin dose based on frequent blood glucose monitoring - Commonly written for q4hr blood glucose test - Sliding scale coverage usually begins after blood glucose >11 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) - If coverage is needed q4hr x 24 hr, then base insulin dose is adjusted Continue reading >>

Humulin 70/30 Vs Novolin 70/30

Humulin 70/30 Vs Novolin 70/30

I found the following on yahoo answers...this is important to me because i get my insulin from wal-mart and was just informed they no longer have humulin 70/30 it was replaced by novolin 70/30..they claim its the same ...what do you guys think! I'm Insulin dependent so I dont see as I really Have a choice Humulin 70/30 begins working within thirty minutes and reaches its peak between two and four hours after injection. Humulin will last between 14 and 24 hours. Novolin 70/30 begins working within thirty minutes and reaches its peak between two and 12 hours. Novolin lasts up to 24 hours. 2.5 MG lisinopril, 81 mg Aspirin ec low dos I question any claim that insulin lasts 24 hours. When I took Lantus I found that I needed to split the dose in half about 12 hours apart. I would further question that claim as its a mix. I believe and respect what you say David! And if it did last 24 hours then I would only have to take 1 shot per day but I have to take 2...one before breakfast and 1 before dinner so there goes the 24 hr theory! I guess my concern is how it will be different...I've been doiung so well and feeling better than I have in years...so the threat of that changing without options or control is kind of disheartening... I gotten used to feeling good and it feels so good Im not willing to give it up, and just worried the change at wal-mart will cause change in how ive been feeling ! 2.5 MG lisinopril, 81 mg Aspirin ec low dos You'll have changes, but if you're diligent in relearning your ratios and how sensitive you are to the new insulin it should only be a temporary situation and not something to be too worried over. I was switched from humalog to Novalog a couple weeks into my insulin usage. Was a pain but a couple weeks later I had it figured out. You can do it. Da Continue reading >>

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The different types of insulin are categorized according to how fast they start to work (onset) and how long they continue to work (duration). The types now available include rapid-, short-, intermediate-, and long-acting insulin. Injectable insulin is packaged in small glass vials (bottles) and cartridges that hold more than one dose and are sealed with rubber lids. The cartridges are used in pen-shaped devices called insulin pens. Insulin usually is given as an injection into the tissues under the skin (subcutaneous). It can also be given through an insulin pump , an insulin pen , or jet injector, a device that sprays the medicine into the skin. Some insulins can be given through a vein (only in a hospital). Research is ongoing to develop not only new forms of insulin but also insulin that can be taken in other ways, such as by mouth. Insulin lets sugar (glucose) in the blood enter cells, where it is used for energy. Without insulin, the blood sugar level rises above what is safe for the body. If the cells don't get sugar to use for energy, they try to use other nutrients in the body. When this happens, acids can build up. Too much acid production (ketoacidosis) can be serious or even life-threatening. Your body uses insulin in different ways. Sometimes you need insulin to work quickly to reduce blood sugar. Your body also needs insulin on a regular basis to keep your blood sugar in a target range. Rapid-acting and short-acting insulins reduce blood sugar levels quickly and then wear off. When you use intermediate- or long-acting insulin with rapid- or short-acting insulins, the longer acting insulin starts taking effect when the shorter acting insulin begins to wear off. For example, the long-acting insulin glargine (Lantus) starts to work within 1 to 2 hours after Continue reading >>

The Problem With Premixed Insulin

The Problem With Premixed Insulin

Premixed insulins were created to simplify diabetes management and insulin dosing, but are they superior or even comparable to the efficacy and safety of using a basal-bolus regimen of two different insulins? What are premixed insulins? Premixed insulins contain both a long-acting and a fast or rapid-acting insulin in the same vial and are injected 2-3 times per day. While there are a variety of ratios of long to fast-acting insulin premixed available, the ratios are not personally customizable. This means that this approach to insulin management is only ideal for a patient if that predetermined ratio fits with the needs with the patient. Specifically, premixed insulins are generally a combination of NPH insulin (an “intermediate-acting insulin) with a fast or rapid-acting insulin (Humalog, Humulin, or Novolog). Here’s a great downloaded pamphlet from ScriptYourFuture that explains: Premixed insulin combines two kinds of insulin. The first kind helps the body control blood sugar (blood glucose) all through the day. The second kind helps the body control blood sugar at meal times. Premixed insulins cannot contain long-acting insulin such as Lantus or Levemir because those insulins, when mixed with other insulins, will destroy the efficacy of other insulins. Today, available premixed insulins listed on Wikipedia are: Humulin 70/30 30 min 2-4 hours 14-24 hours Novolin 70/30 30 min 2-12 hours Up to 24 hours Novolog 70/30 10-20 min 1-4 hours Up to 24 hours Humulin 50/50 30 min 2-5 hours 18-24 hours Humalog mix 75/25 15 min 30 min – 2½ hours 16-20 hours *Premixed insulins combine specific amounts of intermediate-acting and short-acting insulin in one bottle or insulin pen. (The numbers following the brand name indicate the percentage of each type of insulin.) Premixed Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

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