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Humulin 70/30 Peak

Humulin 70-30

Humulin 70-30

HUMULIN® 70/30 (70% human insulin isophane) Suspension and (30% human insulin) Injection, [rDNA origin] DESCRIPTION HUMULIN 70/30 (70% human insulin isophane suspension and 30% human insulin injection [rDNA origin]) is a human insulin suspension. Human insulin is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. HUMULIN 70/30 is a suspension of crystals produced from combining human insulin and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation and mixing with human insulin injection. The amino acid sequence of HUMULIN 70/30 is identical to human insulin and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 with a molecular weight of 5808. HUMULIN 70/30 is a sterile white suspension. Each milliliter of HUMULIN 70/30 contains 100 units of insulin human, 0.24 mg of protamine sulfate, 16 mg of glycerin, 3.78 mg of dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.6 mg of metacresol, 0.65 mg of phenol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, and Water for Injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.8. Sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. For Consumers What are the possible side effects of insulin isophane and insulin regular? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin isophane and insulin regular. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Watch for signs of l Continue reading >>

When Does Humulin Insulin Peak?

When Does Humulin Insulin Peak?

Like all regular insulins, Humulin R helps to prevent your blood sugar level from rising excessively after meals. The activity of Humulin R typically peaks two to four hours after you inject the medication. To synchronize the peak activity of Humulin R with the blood sugar peak associated with eating, you inject this form of insulin approximately 20 to 30 minutes before meals. Humulin N contains insulin in a chemical suspension that slows and prolongs its release. The peak activity of Humulin N typically occurs approximately eight hours after your injection. The duration of activity is approximately 12 to 16 hours. The activity profile of Humulin N makes it useful for maintaining a relatively constant level of insulin in your bloodstream if administered twice daily. This helps keep your blood sugar level steady between meals. Humulin 70/30 is a premixed formulation containing 70 percent Humulin N and 30 percent Humulin R. The premixed drug is convenient if your doctor prescribes both regular and NPH insulin. Two activity peaks occur with this combination medication; one approximately two hours after injection from the regular insulin and a second lower peak approximately 10 hours after injection from the NPH insulin. Variability in Peak Activity The reported peak activity times for various types of Humulin are averages; your experience may be different. After using Humulin for several weeks, you and your doctor may discover from your home glucose monitoring that you are experiencing peak activity earlier or later than the reported average. If this occurs, the timing of your injections may need to be adjusted. Do not change the dose or timing of your insulin injections unless you talk with your doctor. The peak activity of your insulin dose may also change from one day t Continue reading >>

Noted) Brand Name Manufacturer Form Delivery Cloudy Or Clear Onset Peak Duration

Noted) Brand Name Manufacturer Form Delivery Cloudy Or Clear Onset Peak Duration

Generic Name (U-100, except where Rapid Acting insulin aspart NovoLog Novo Nordisk analog syringe; prefilled, 300-unit disposable pen; reusable pen with 300-unit cartridges; pump clear 10 to 20 min. 30 to 90 min. 3 to 5 hours insulin human Afrezza Sanofi human inhaler with 4- and 8-unit cartridges N/A (inhaled powder) 10 to 20 min. 12 to 15 min. 3 hours insulin glulisine Apidra Sanofi analog syringe; prefilled, 300-unit disposable pen; pump clear 10 to 20 min. 30 to 90 min. 3 to 5 hours insulin lispro Humalog* Eli Lilly analog syringe, prefilled disposable pen, reusable pen with cartridges, pump clear 10 to 20 min. 30 to 90 min. 3 to 5 hours Regular Regular Humulin R+ Eli Lilly human syringe clear 30 to 60 min. 2 to 4 hours 5 to 8 hours Regular Novolin R Novo Nordisk human syringe clear 30 to 60 min. 2 to 4 hours 5 to 8 hours Intermediate Acting NPH Humulin N Eli Lilly human syringe; prefilled, 300-unit disposable pen cloudy 1 to 3 hours 8 hours 12 to 16 hours NPH Novolin N, ReliOn (Walmart) Novo Nordisk human syringe cloudy 1 to 3 hours 8 hours 12 to 16 hours Long Acting insulin detemir Levemir Novo Nordisk analog syringe; prefilled, 300-unit disposable pen clear 1 hour No peak 20 to 26 hours insulin glargine Lantus Sanofi analog syringe; prefilled, 300-unit disposable pen clear 1 hour No peak 20 to 26 hours Ultra Long Acting insulin glargine U-300 Toujeo Sanofi analog prefilled, 300-unit disposable pen clear 6 hours No peak 36 hours Mixtures 50% lispro prota- mine/50% insulin lispro Humalog Mix 50/50 Eli Lilly analog syringe; prefilled, 300-unit disposable pen cloudy 10 to 15 min. Varies 10 to 16 hours 75% lispro protamine (NPL)/25% insulin lispro Humalog Mix 75/25 Eli Lilly analog syringe; prefilled, 300-unit disposable pen cloudy 10 to 15 min. Varies 10 to 16 hours Continue reading >>

Hit Me With Your Best Shot: Updates In Insulin Therapy

Hit Me With Your Best Shot: Updates In Insulin Therapy

C A T H Y E D I C K , P H A R M D , C D E A P R I L 9 , 2 0 1 7 Pharmacist Learning Objectives  List the onset, peak and duration of action for the various insulin preparations  Determine which insulin to use and how to adjust doses based on blood glucose values from a given patient  Assess where the newest insulin products fit into diabetes management Pharmacy Technician Learning Objectives  List the onset, peak and duration of action for the various insulin preparations  Describe the newest insulin products  Describe how blood glucose values are used to make adjustments to insulin regimens Insulin Basics  When is insulin indicated?  Type 1 = ALWAYS  Type 2 =  High baseline A1c  Poorly controlled on 3 oral/non-insulin medications  Contraindications to non-insulin medications  Pregnant women  Hospitalized patients Review Question  Which of the following appropriately orders the insulins from shortest acting to longest acting? A. NPH, Lantus, Humalog B. Humulin R, Novolog, Levemir C. Tresiba, NPH, Levemir D. Novolog, NPH, Lantus Insulin Basics Types Examples Rapid-acting Aspart (Novolog) Lispro (Humalog) Glulisine (Apidra) Short-acting Regular (Humulin R, Novolin R) Intermediate- acting NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N) Long-acting Glargine (Lantus, Basaglar, Toujeo) Detemir (Levemir) Ultra long-acting Degludec (Tresiba) 4/4/2017 2 Insulin Basics Onset Peak Duration Rapid-acting 15-30 min 30 min to 2.5 hours 3 to 6.5 hours Short-acting 30 min to 1 hour 2 to 3 hours 8 hours Intermediate- acting 1 to 2 hours 4 to 10 hours 16 to 24 hours Long-acting Glargine 1 hour Relatively flat 20 to 24 hours Detemir 1 to 2 hours Relatively flat 12 to 24 hours (dose dependent) Ultra long- Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

What you need to know If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. Rapid-acting insulin What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Short-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. Intermediate-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about Continue reading >>

Making The Most Of Pre-mixed Insulin

Making The Most Of Pre-mixed Insulin

Perhaps due to insurance reasons, or to help decrease the amount of insulin injections you take, you find yourself on pre-mixed insulin that you take twice a day, before breakfast and dinner. There are different types of pre-mixed insulin, ones that are mixed with intermediate acting insulin and rapid acting insulin, and those that are mixed between intermediate acting insulin and regular acting insulin. These tend to be more affordable. Some examples of rapid acting/intermediate acting are Novolog 70/30 (70% intermediate acting, and 30% rapid acting); Humalog 75/25 (75% intermediate acting and 25% rapid acting); and Humalog 50/50 (50% intermediate acting and 50% rapid acting). These insulins have onset times of about 10-15 minutes. Their peak times vary--usually in 4-5 hours--and lasts for about 10-16 hours. Examples of intermediate acting insulin and regular acting mixes include: Humulin 70/30 ( 70% NPH insulin and 30% regular acting insulin); Novolin 70/30 (70% NPH and 30% regular acting insulin; and Humulin 50/50 (50% NPH and 50% regular acting insulin). The onset for these insulin is longer (30- 60 minutes). Their peak times vary, but usually happen in 4-5 hours, and can last anywhere from 10-16 hours. When taking pre-mixed insulin, you need to remember there is no room for flexibility. People who are in a regular routine when taking their medication and have a routine eating pattern, like eat three meals per day at specific times, will be the best candidates for pre-mixed insulin. Because the insulin has certain peak times, it is not flexible like a multi-dose insulin regimen would be. People on pre-mixed insulin need to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner, and a small nighttime snack. They cannot skip meals and they cannot miss insulin doses. Remember pre-mixed is m Continue reading >>

Insulin Analogs

Insulin Analogs

TYPE OF INSULIN Made by Starts to work in Works most Lasts: Best time to take RAPID-ACTING INSULINS (used to cover carbs and to lower high blood glucose) Novolog aspart Novo Nordisk 5-10 minutes 1-3 hours 3-5 hours Take 5-15 minutes before meal. Can be adjusted based on carb count. Have a plan for missed meal doses. U200 pen holds 600 units. Apidra Glulisine Sanofi 15 minutes 30-90 minutes 3-5 hours Humalog Lispro Lilly 15 minutes 30 –90 minutes 4-5 hours Humalog U200 Kwikpen Lilly 15 minutes 30 –90 minutes 4-5 hours LONG-ACTING INSULINS (BASAL/BACKGROUND)can take at same time as mealtime Levemir Detemir Novo 1 ½ hr Little or no peak Up to 24 hours Do not mix with other insulin in same syringe Usually 2xday, doesn’t need to be 12 hrs apart Lantus (solostar pen) Glargine Sanofi Up to 24 hours Do not mix with other insulin in same syringe Occasionally sting because of pH Usually once a day, morning or evening. If 2xday, doesn’t need to be 12 hrs apart Basaglar Kwikpen Glargine Dec 2016 Biosimilar Lilly Toujeo Glargine U300 Sanofi 36 hours Pen holds 450 units. Once a day same time. Stable room temp for 42 days. Adjust 3-4 days apart Tresiba Flexpen Degludec Novo 36 hours Once a day same time. U 100, dials to 80 or U 200 dials to 160. Stable room temp for 56 days. Adjust 3-4 days PREMIXED INSULIN Analogs Novolog Mix 70/30 Aspart protamine suspension with aspart 10-20 minutes 1-3 ¾ hours Up to 24 hours Taken 2-3 times a day, before meals. Humalog Mix 75/25 Lispro protamine suspention with lispro 15-30 minutes 30 minutes to 2 ½ hours 14-24 hours Other Insulins Short acting insulin Humulin R regular U100 Lilly 30 minutes 80minutes -2 hours 5-7 hours Usually taken 30 minutes before meal. Can mix with NPH Novolin R Regular U100 Novo Nordisk 3 Continue reading >>

Insulin Isophane Human/insulin Regular Human (otc)

Insulin Isophane Human/insulin Regular Human (otc)

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Suggested guidelines for beginning dose Ketones moderate or less: 0.5 U/kg/day SC Ketones large: 0.7 U/kg/day SC Typically, 50-75% of total daily dose is given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin May use this combination product if the dosage ratio of NPH (isophane) to regular is 2:1 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Suggested guidelines for beginning dose; adjust according to blood glucose levels Initial dose: 0.5-1 units/kg/day in divided doses Typically, 50-75% of total daily dose is given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin May use this combination product if the dosage ratio of NPH (isophane) to regular is 2:1 Administer within 15 min before a meal or immediately after a meal Store unopened vials/pens refrigerated; do not freeze Opened (in-use) product may be stored at ambient room temperature (below 86°F [30°C]) and away from heat and light Dosage Adjustment Strategies Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing (See Dosage Adjustment Strategies) Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Adjust only one insulin dose at a time Correct hypoglycemia first Correct highest blood sugars next If all blood sugars are high (within 2.75 mmol/L [50 mg/dL]): correct morning fasting blood glucose 1st Many sliding scales exist to determine exact insulin dose based on frequent blood glucose monitoring - Commonly written for q4hr blood glucose test - Sliding scale coverage usually begins after blood glucose >11 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) - If coverage is needed q4hr x 24 hr, then base insulin dose is adjusted first; sliding scale doses may be adjusted upward Continue reading >>

Humulin 70/30

Humulin 70/30

Generic Name: insulin isophane and insulin regular (IN su lin EYE soe fane and IN su lin REG ue lar) Brand Names: HumuLIN 70/30, HumuLIN 70/30 KwikPen, NovoLIN 70/30, ReliOn/NovoLIN 70/30 What is Humulin 70/30? Humulin 70/30 contains a combination of insulin isophane and insulin regular. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is a intermediate-acting insulin. Insulin regular is an short-acting insulin. This combination insulin starts to work within 10 to 20 minutes after injection, peaks in 2 hours, and keeps working for up to 24 hours. Humulin 70/30 is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Humulin 70/30 may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important information Do not use Humulin 70/30 if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of Humulin 70/30. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, hunger, sweating, pale skin, irritability, dizziness, feeling shaky, or trouble concentrating. Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humulin 70/30 if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humulin 70/30 is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazo Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Insulin, Regular Insulin, NPH Insulin, Lispro, Insulin Lente, Ultralente Insulin, Novolin, Humulin, Novolog, Fiasp, Humalog, Short-Acting Insulin, Bolus Insulin, Aspart, Apidra, Glulisine, Insulin-Related Errors, Insulin Pen Injection sites: Abdomen , outer thigh, back of arm, flank and buttocks Insert needle at 90 degree angle into skin Insulin injection is subcutaneous (not intramuscular) Intramuscular Injection results in rapid absorption and risk of Hypoglycemia Prevent too deep of injection (esp. longer needles) by pinching an inch of skin at the injection site Hold needle in place for 5-10 seconds after injection to prevent leakage of Insulin Rotate injection sites to prevent lipohypertrophy (see adverse effects below) More consistent absorption than traditional Insulin Basal agents release at more constant rate New anologues are however 10 fold more expensive than Regular Insulin and NPH Vials of NPH and Regular are each $26 per vial OTC at Walmart as of 2017 Contrast with $250 per vial for analogues Outcomes are similar with newer analogues versus older NPH and Regular Combination agents are discouraged unless noncompliant Insulin 70/30 is also $26 OTC at Walmart as of 2017 (Reli-On) Reduces flexibility in meal and activity timing Longer needles risk deeper, intramuscular penetration, with more rapid absorption and Hypoglycemia risk Insulin Pen needles 4 mm are sufficiently long Insulin syringe needles should be at least 6 mm long to clear the syringe stopper Smaller needles (higher gauge) 30 or 31 are preferred for the least discomfort on insertion Select smallest Insulin syringe that will hold each of the Insulin doses, allowing for added coverage Prescribe syringes in number of boxes (100 syringes per box) Syringes are sized at 100 units Insulin/ml Insulin P Continue reading >>

Combination Insulins

Combination Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Novolin® 70/30 - Humulin® 70/30 Novolog® Mix 70/30 Humalog® Mix 75/25 SOLIQUA™ 100/33 (insulin glargine and lixisenatide injection) XULTOPHY® 100/3.6 (insulin degludec and liraglutide injection) --® Onset: 30-60 min Peak: 2-12 hours Duration: 18 - 24 hours Solution: Cloudy Comments: Mixture of 70% NPH, Human Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30% Regular, Human Insulin Injection. Recommended interval between dosing and meal initiation: 30 minutes. Mixing You should not attempt to change the ratio of this product by adding additional NPH or Regular insulin to the vial. If the physician has prescribed insulin mixed in a proportion other than 70% NPH and 30% Regular, you should use the separate insulin formulations (e.g. NPH and Regular insulin ) in the amounts recommended by the physician. All Unopened Novolin 70/30: • Keep all unopened Novolin 70/30 in the refrigerator between 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). • Do not freeze. Do not use Novolin 70/30 if it has been frozen. • If refrigeration is not possible, the unopened vial may be kept at room temperature for up to 6 weeks (42 days), as long as it is kept at or below 77°F (25°C). • Keep unopened Novolin 70/30 in the carton to protect from light. Novolin 70/30 in use: Vials • Keep at room temperature below 77°F (25°C) for up to 6 weeks (42 days). • Keep vials away from direct heat or light. • Throw away an opened vial after 6 weeks (42 days) of use, even if there is insulin left in the vial. • Unopened vials can be used until the expiration date on the Novolin 70/30 label, if the medicine has been stored in a refrigerator. Note: double mouse click to return to the top of the page Onset Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70/30 Confusion

Novolog Mix 70/30 Confusion

When prescribing NovoLog® Mix 70/30 analog insulin, health care professionals may write an unclear prescription, or if using an EMR system, inadvertently select Novolin® 70/30 human insulin instead. Be on the lookout for these errors. Read on for a breakdown of the key differences between these 2 types of insulin. Before the new “insulin pens” came out, there were four types of insulin: rapid-acting, short-acting, intermediate-acting, and long-acting. When it comes to the pre-mixed insulins, like Novolog 70/30, there are fewer differences between the brands (for example, Novolog versus Novolin)…. Whether contained in a bottle or in a pen, the premixed insulins all contain a combination of both an intermediate-acting insulin and a short-acting insulin. The numbers on the bottle or pen refer to the percentage of each type of insulin contained in the mixture. That means both Novolin 70/30 and Novolog 70/30 contain a mixture that is 70% intermediate-acting insulin with 30% short-acting insulin. However, Novolin 70/30 takes slightly longer to begin working than Novolog 70/30, which has a rapid onset. Both Novolin 70/30 and Novolog 70/30 may last up to 24 hours in the system. Novolin® 70/30 is not available in a pen. Novolin is the brand name given to all human insulins made by Novo Nordisk. Under this brand are specific types of insulin such as regular, nph, and 70/30. Novolog insulin is a synthetic recombinant insulin that is very rapid acting. You may often get this question because novolog is more expensive than any of the novolins. However, they cannot be substituted for each other. Two euglycemic clamp studies assessed glucose utilization after dosing of healthy volunteers. NovoLog Mix 70/30 has an earlier onset of action than human premix 70/30 in studies of n Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy Components

Insulin Therapy Components

to the editor: The following errors appear in Table 1 of the article “Insulin Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes: Rescue, Augmentation, and Replacement of Beta-Cell Function.”1 TABLE 1 Insulin Onset Peak (hours) Usual effective duration (hours) Usual maximum duration (hours) Cost* Bolus or mealtime insulin Aspart (NovoLog) 5 to 10 minutes 1 to 3 3 to 5 4 to 6 $59 Lispro (Humalog) < 15 minutes 0.5 to 1.5 2 to 4 4 to 6 59 Regular (Humulin R, Novolin R) 30 to 60 minutes 2 to 3 3 to 6 6 to 10 28 Basal insulin NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N) 2 to 4 hours 4 to 10 10 to 16 14 to 18 28 Lente (insulin zinc suspension) 3 to 4 hours 4 to 12 12 to 18 16 to 20 Ultralente (extended insulin zinc suspension) 6 to 10 hours Peakless 18 to 20 20 to 24 28 Glargine (Lantus) 1 hour, 6 minutes Peakless 24 24 51 Combinations 50% NPH/50% regular 30 to 60 minutes Dual 10 to 16 14 to 18 70% NPH/30% regular (Humulin R 70/30, Novolin R 70/30) 30 to 60 minutes Dual 10 to 16 14 to 18 28 75% NPL/25% lispro (Humalog 75/25) < 15 minutes Dual 10 to 16 14 to 18 59† 70% APS/30% aspart (NovoLog Mix 70/30) 10 to 20 minutes 2.4 ± 0.80 24 24 59 *—Estimated cost to the pharmacist for one 10-ml vial based on average wholesale prices in Red book. Montvale, N.J.: Medical Economics Data, 2004. Cost to the patient will be higher, depending on prescription filling fee. NovoLog Mix 70/30 is incorrectly identified as “NovoLog 70/30” and is incorrectly described as 70 percent neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin and 30 percent aspart. NovoLog Mix 70/30 does not contain NPH insulin, but rather 70 percent insulin aspart (rDNA origin) protamine suspension and 30 percent insulin aspart (rDNA origin) injection. NovoLog Mix 70/30 is a single solution containing a premixed formulation of 70 percent insulin aspart in the c Continue reading >>

The Abcs Of Insulin

The Abcs Of Insulin

Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin is required to move sugar from the blood into the body’s cells, where it can be used for energy. For the symptoms of high blood sugar and low blood sugar, see Tables 1 and 2. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Only 5% of patients with diabetes have this form of the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is much more common; the risk factors are listed in online table 3. Individuals with T2D make insulin, but their bodies don’t respond well to it, a condition known as insulin resistance. Treatment of T2D usually begins with dietary and lifestyle changes, as well as oral medications. Over time, as the pancreas struggles to make an adequate amount of insulin to overcome insulin resistance, patients may require insulin supplementation. Insulin therapy must be individualized and balanced with meal planning and exercise. When a patient begins using insulin to manage diabetes, the initial dose is just a starting point. Over time, insulin requirements are affected by factors such as weight gain or loss, changes in eating habits, and the addition of other medications. The need for insulin often increases, and the dose must be readjusted to meet the new requirements. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, meaning not very deep under the skin. Common injection sites include the stomach, buttocks, thighs, and upper arms. By rotating the site of injection, patients can avoid lipohypertrophy, a slight increase in the growth or size of fat cells under the skin. When lipohypertrophy occurs, a soft pillowy growth may form at the repeated-use injection site. Therefore, for reliable absorption rates and cosmetic Continue reading >>

Humulin 70 30 Peak Times - Medhelp

Humulin 70 30 Peak Times - Medhelp

Common Questions and Answers about Humulin 70 30 peak times Lantus, Humalog, and Novolog ALL require prescrptions because 1) they have not been out on the market as long as the conventional porcine/bovine insulins ( Humulin N, R, L, 50/50, 70 / 30 , etc), 2) The onset of actions for Humalog, Novolog, and Lantus are quite fast (anywhere between 5 to 15 minutes), and although these insulins generally do NOT cause hypoglycemia episodes (low blood sugar), if patients do not know how to use them properly, they can lapse into a hypoglycemia episode and this can Copyright 1994-2018 MedHelp. All rights reserved. MedHelp is a division of Vitals Consumer Services, LLC. The Content on this Site is presented in a summary fashion, and is intended to be used for educational and entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be and should not be interpreted as medical advice or a diagnosis of any health or fitness problem, condition or disease; or a recommendation for a specific test, doctor, care provider, procedure, treatment plan, product, or course of action. MedHelp is not a medical or healthcare provider and your use of this Site does not create a doctor / patient relationship. We disclaim all responsibility for the professional qualifications and licensing of, and services provided by, any physician or other health providers posting on or otherwise referred to on this Site and/or any Third Party Site. Never disregard the medical advice of your physician or health professional, or delay in seeking such advice, because of something you read on this Site. We offer this Site AS IS and without any warranties. By using this Site you agree to the following Terms and Conditions . If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your physician or 911 immediately. Continue reading >>

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