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Humalog Vs Novolog Pregnancy

Novolog Vs Humalog: Which Is Better?

Novolog Vs Humalog: Which Is Better?

Ahhh yes, the million dollar question. In the land of type 1 diabetes and rapid acting insulin, everyone wants to know, which works better…Novolog vs Humalog? Thank You Insurance Companies (not!) You’re probably here because your insurance company has pulled the plug on your beloved insulin and is making you switch to the dark side. Whether they signed a deal with Lilly (Humalog) or Novo Nordisk (Novolog) you’re left in sheer panic because WTH insurance companies?! This is my life juice you’re messing with here. You’ve been reassured by your doctor…and their nurses…and the pharmacist that there is no difference between the two brands… It’s like pepsi vs coke – my doctors nurse. Well, if you know anything about pepsi or coke then you know… while it’s true that some can’t taste the difference, others most definitely can. Same is true with Novolog vs Humalog. Show me the differences! Novolog vs Humalog But first, the similarities. Both Novolog and Humalog are human insulin analogs. This means that they are a synthetically altered form of human insulin – the kind that you find naturally occurring in the human body (as opposed to being extracted from cows and pigs – like it was back in the 20’s). Both should begin working in about 15 minutes after injection, should peak in about 1 hour, and should continue to work for 2-4 hours. What’s with all the shoulds? Everyone reacts to medications differently; insulin is no exception. …which brings me to the differences In Humalog (insulin lispro) the amino acids for proline and lysine have been swapped. This means that the amino acid, proline, has been substituted for lysine in position 28 of the B-Chain, and lysine has be substituted for proline in position 29 of the B-Chain. In Novolog (insulin a Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog.

Humalog Vs. Novolog.

It wasn't until recently that I started thinking about building up a tolerance to insulin. Do you build up a chemical familiarity, a resistance of sorts, to a drug after taking it for ... oh, say a few decades? Do PWD eventually become the Dread Pirate Roberts, building up a tolerance to iocane powder? "I realize this is probably ridiculous, and I'm sure there aren't any studies on this," I said to my doctor the other week. "But it has prompted me to want to try a different kind of fast acting insulin, to see if I have better results. Is that something I'm able to do, to have a script written for a one-off in order to assess how the insulin might work for me?" "We can do that." And I left the appointment, expecting my pharmacy to auto-dial me when my order was complete. Instead, a three-month supply of Novolog ended up on my doorstep, having been accidentally shuttled through my mail order pharmacy and eating up my insurance order that was intended for my normal course of Humalog. Which is why I'm experimenting with Novolog for the next few months, as a result of a shipping error. I've been taking Humalog for over ten years, after switching from Regular insulin before starting on my insulin pump, so I feel like I'm familiar with how Humalog acts in my pump and on my blood sugars. Switching to a different, but similar, rapid-acting analog should hopefully be a seamless transition. Last night was my first pump-load of Novolog, despite the last unopened bottle of Humalog in my stash. (I didn't want to use up the Humalog entirely, then switch to Novolog, because if I absolutely hated the new insulin, I'd be stuck with it.) So far, last night was entirely uneventful, and the biggest change I've noticed (in less than 24 hours of use) is that the bottle of Novolog plays host t Continue reading >>

Fiasp Insulin, Insulin Aspart, Fiasp Vs Novolog

Fiasp Insulin, Insulin Aspart, Fiasp Vs Novolog

Insulin aspart is a powerhouse in the world of diabetes . It was introduced under the brand name Novolog in June of 2000. For over 15 years, Novolog has been a staple of insulin regimens for many patients. Novolog and Humalog are the two most commonly prescribed fast-acting insulins that patients take within 15 minutes of mealtime. For this article, we will be paying closer attention to insulin aspart (more commonly called Novolog or Novorapid® in Europe and Canada). Novolog itself is an insulin analogue. This means it has been modified from regular insulin to change its structure and how quickly it is absorbed from under the skin. Novo Nordisk teamed up their workhorse Novolog insulin with a B3 vitamin (nicotinamide) to make it absorb more quickly and the amino acid arginine to stabilize it. That’s right! Fiasp insulin is simply Novolog with two small additions: Vitamin B3 and naturally occurring arginine. Researchers discovered that adding nicotinamide to the insulin aspart molecule causes its initial absorption to happen more quickly. This means it acts more like the insulin normally made by your pancreas . Fiasp insulin can even be taken up to 20 minutes AFTER starting the meal! So if Fiasp were racing Novolog, it could give Novolog a 15-minute head start and still catch up! Not only that, but twice as much insulin is available within 30 minutes of injecting Fiasp as compared to Novolog . More insulin available earlier means more insulin is in the body to handle the sugar entering your blood stream after eating. So what are the key differences between Novolog and Fiasp? Here is a quick summary: Beginning of meal, up to 20 minutes after Added nicotinamide for faster absorption and L-arginine for stability Pricing has not been finalized in the USA Fiasp is in a cl Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

The two leaders in the fast acting insulin market, Humalog and Novolog, are the most common types of fast acting insulin used by those with diabetes today. Fast Acting, mealtime insulin is a type of insulin that is injected before or right after eating. When you eat your blood glucose begins to rise. Fast acting insulin, Humalog and Novolog work to help manage these rises or spikes to keep your blood glucose levels more within range and balanced. When you use a fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog, you typically will continue to take a long acting insulin to help manage your levels between your meals and throughout the night. The question is though, is there really a difference between the two? Endocrinologists and other medical professionals don’t seem to really think there is, stating the two are virtually interchangeable. But that’s not really the full story. Humalog (Insulin Lispro) Insulin Lispro (Humalog) has been on the market since 1996, when it was first introduced by Eli Lily. Humalog is the first insulin analogue that was used clinically. Insulin Lispro received its name due to its structure. The difference between it and regular insulin was the switch between the lysine B28 (an amino acid) and proline B29. The formula consists of a hexametric solution available in vials and pen form. After a subcutaneous injection, the formula converts into a monomeric formula which allows it to have a fast absorption in the body. The one noted negative factor of Humalog is its short term control of glucose levels. Additionally, if it is injected and mealtime happens to be delayed, a hypoglycemic episode may occur. For Humalog to be most effective it is to be injected 15 minutes prior to the start of a meal. I recommend reading the following articles: Humalog is a Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Compare Humalog Vs. Novolog

Compare Humalog Vs. Novolog

Humalog (insulin lispro) is the most effective medication for lowering your blood sugar. Works quickly to control your sugar levels after meals. Dose can be easily adjusted to create a regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Humalog (insulin lispro) can be used even if you have liver or kidney problems, unlike other anti-diabetic medications. When used correctly, this medication will l lower blood sugar every time you use it and prevent the harmful, long-term effects of high sugar levels on your organs and blood vessels. You can easily change the dose of Novolog (insulin aspart) to fit your individual needs. Starting insulin early in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes can maintain your body's insulin-producing cells and slow down disease progression. Can use Novolog (insulin aspart) even if you have liver or kidney problems, unlike many other blood sugar-lowering medicines. 280 reviews so far Have you used Humalog (insulin lispro)? Leave a review 177 reviews so far Have you used Novolog (insulin aspart)? Leave a review Continue reading >>

Switching From Novolog To Humalog

Switching From Novolog To Humalog

Looks like Ill be switching insulins, due to new Rx coverage, effective in January 2018. My endo has said they are essentially the same, but I thought Id check in here. Also on Lantus, but that will stay the same. Doing MDI with a CGM right now. I think there are minor differences that can be noticeable for some people. I tried Humalog briefly and found that I needed much more of it for carbs and corrections, that I had to increase my basal rates (I was using it in a pump) and that it didnt last as long. My son has not used Humalog, but Ive heard the same as @Scott_Eric . Calebs endo discourages its use bc of experience hes seen with pumping - it being more susceptible to clogging. Any chance your insurance is Aetna? We got a similar notice. I made that switch and didnt notice much of a differenceI think humalog may be a tiny bit faster/have less of a tail, but hard to say. Im also on MDI (humalog and tresiba, formerly lantus), so the clogging/pumping concern wasnt an issue. I used NovoLog for years and Ive used Humalog for years. I dont see any functional difference between the two. I have noticed on the internet some people claim they find difference between the two. If thats true its now a your mileage may vary issue Ive used both. I need about 12% more insulin on Humalog than on Novolog on MDI. But in a previous thread on a different message board, I noted that there were others who had the opposite experience. Also Humalog gets started a little faster than Novolog for me and at least in previous years had a slightly shorter tail. However, this year Ive noticed that a typical mealtime dose (8 units) of Humalog takes between five and six hours to finish working, which is as long as Novolog took the last time I was on it about three years ago.It may be just that at m Continue reading >>

About Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin

About Fast-acting Mealtime Insulin

What is mealtime insulin? Mealtime insulins are fast-acting insulins that are taken immediately before or after meals. As you eat, your blood sugar naturally goes up, or “spikes.” Humalog® (a fast-acting insulin) works to manage those blood sugar spikes and may help keep your sugar levels in balance. Humalog should be taken within 15 minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. People who take Humalog will usually continue to take longer-acting insulin to help manage blood sugar levels at night and between meals. Taking mealtime insulin in addition to longer-acting insulin may help to control blood sugar levels throughout the day. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect of Humalog that may be severe and cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Test your blood sugar levels as your doctor instructs. Talk to your doctor about low blood sugar symptoms and treatment. The orange area shows how blood sugar levels typically rise after meals. The pattern of insulin action may vary in different individuals or within the same individual. Comparing types of insulin Take a look at our overview below to find out about the different types of insulin. You’ll notice that there are differences in when the types of insulin reach your bloodstream, when they “peak” in your body, and how long they can last (length of time the insulin keeps lowering your blood sugar). Fast-acting insulin (also called rapid-acting) is absorbed quickly and starts working in about 15 minutes to lower blood sugar after meals. Humalog fast-acting insulin should be taken 15 minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. Depending on the type of diabetes you have, you may need to take Humalog with a longer-acting insulin or oral anti-diabetes medication. Continue reading >>

Taking Insulin During Pregnancy

Taking Insulin During Pregnancy

When your blood glucose levels stay raised despite meal planning and physical activity, insulin must be added to your management plan to keep you and your baby healthy. Pregnancy requires that your body produce extra amounts of insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is made by the pancreas. If your pancreas does not make enough insulin, injections can help you meet the need. Your health care provider and diabetes educator will teach you how to inject insulin safely and comfortably. Determining the right insulin and dosage Tip Keep a record of the type and amount of insulin you take. It is important that you know and remember your insulin type every time you speak with a health care provider. Your health care provider will decide what kind of insulin is right for you, how much to use and when you should take it, based on: your weight (which changes weekly) how far along your pregnancy is your meal plan your most recent blood glucose levels Sometimes, you may need more than one type of insulin. Different types of insulin work at different speeds, and your health care provider may combine insulins to achieve the best results for you. Time-action of different insulins Insulins Starts working Peaks Stops working Rapid acting: Humalog® (lispro) NovoLog® (aspart) Apidra® (glulisine) 5 to 15 minutes 1 to 2 hours 2 to 4 hours Intermediate acting: NPH (N) 2 to 4 hours 4 to 8 hours 10 to 16 hours Basal*: Lantus® (glargine) Levemir® (detemir) 2 hours No peak 24 hours *Lantus® and Levemir® cannot be mixed with any other insulin. How to help insulin work best Take your insulin at the same times each day as directed. Talk with your health care provider if you feel sick. Follow any instructions your health care provider gives you. Don't change your meal plan, physical activity, pres Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

Extra care is needed because NovoLog is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for NovoLog When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. NovoLog is a rapid-acting form of insulin that should be injected below the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. Have food ready before injection. After injecting the insulin, do not skip a meal or delay eating. 2. Prepare your insulin. An intermediate- or long-acting insulin is often prescribed with NovoLog. NovoLog can be mixed with insulin NPH (intermediate-acting insulin), but always draw NovoLog into the syringe first. Never mix NovoLog with Lantus. Do not mix NovoLog with other insulins if using an insulin pen or external pump. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, special sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. If you use more than one type of insulin, make each vial or pen look different by putting a rubber band around one type of insulin. 6. Check your medicine. NovoLog can be confused with Humalog (another rapid-acting insulin). When you pick up your insulin at the pharmacy, be sure it's Continue reading >>

What Is Novolog (insulin Aspart)?

What Is Novolog (insulin Aspart)?

Before you receive DARZALEX®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: have a history of breathing problems have had shingles (herpes zoster) are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. DARZALEX® may harm your unborn baby. Females who are able to become pregnant should use an effective method of birth control during treatment and for at least 3 months after your final dose of DARZALEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that you can use during this time. are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if DARZALEX® passes into your breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. DARZALEX® may be given alone or together with other medicines used to treat multiple myeloma. Your healthcare provider will decide the time between doses as well as how many treatments you will receive. Your healthcare provider will give you medicines before each dose of DARZALEX® and on the first day after each dose of DARZALEX® to help reduce the risk of infusion reactions. If you miss any appointments, call your healthcare provider as soon as possible to reschedule your appointment. Infusion reactions. Infusion reactions are common with DARZALEX® and can be severe. Your healthcare provider may temporarily stop your infusion or completely stop treatment with DARZALEX® if you have infusion reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms: shortness of breath or trouble breathing dizziness or lightheadedness (hypotension) cough wheezing throat tightness runny or stuffy nose headache itching nausea vomiting chills fever Changes in blood tests. DARZALEX Continue reading >>

Insulin Analogs And Pregnancy

Insulin Analogs And Pregnancy

Diabetes during pregnancy is a major risk factor for poor fetal, neonatal, and maternal outcomes; however, the risk can be greatly reduced by early institution of medical nutritional therapy and insulin treatment. Maintaining maternal glycemia as near to normal as possible reduces the risk of congenital anomalies, macrosomia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and large-for-gestational-age infants. Achieving normoglycemia has usually been accomplished with human insulin. However, the newer rapid-acting insulin analogs lispro and aspart, when compared to regular human insulin, demonstrate both efficacy and safety for the treatment of diabetes during pregnancy. NPH insulin is the only basal insulin that has been studied in pregnancy. There are not yet any published controlled studies evaluating the long-acting insulin analogs for use in pregnancy. Pregnancy complicated by diabetes occurs in ∼ 4% of pregnancies in the United States.1 With appropriate institution of intensive diabetes therapy and maintenance of glucose levels to achieve a lowering of hemoglobin A1c (A1C) levels before and during pregnancy complicated by diabetes, the rate of fetal and maternal complications can be reduced to the rate observed among nondiabetic pregnancies.2 Whether the pregnancy is classified as pregestational diabetes (occurring in women who have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes before pregnancy) or as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, occurring when a nondiabetic woman develops diabetes only during pregnancy), the goal of treatment is to maintain maternal glucose levels as near to normal as possible throughout the pregnancy. Pregestational diabetes is a major risk factor for spontaneous abortions and congenital malformations, but the risk can be significantly reduced when hyperglycem Continue reading >>

Difference Between Novolog And Humalog

Difference Between Novolog And Humalog

Introduction Insulin is a hormone that is manufactured by beta cells of the pancreatic tissue. After each meal, beta cells release this hormone into the system to enable to body to store glucose that is obtained from the diet. Without the release of this hormone, blood sugar will remain elevated. This sustained elevation in blood sugar has detrimental effects to blood vessels and to other organs, such as the eyes, heart and kidneys. Those who are affected by type 1 diabetes have a defective pancreatic secretion of insulin. Among these individuals, the beta cells of the pancreas are severely damaged, necessitating supplementation of insulin analogs to maintain blood sugar at normal levels. Those with type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, are able to release insulin. However, they have insulin-resistance, which means that there is a poor response from the body despite adequate release of the hormone from the pancreas. Because of this, these patients also need insulin analogues to prevent complications of prolonged blood sugar elevation. Types on Insulin Analogues Insulin analogues are characterized depending on their systemic effect after injection. There is a rapid-acting insulin, which begins to work systemically, 15 minutes after administration. Insulin levels in the blood reach its maximum after hours and continue to act systemically for another 2-4 hours. Examples of these are Insulin Lispro (Humalog) and Insulin Aspart (Novolog). Regular or short-acting insulin is released slower than rapid-acting insulin. After administration, insulin reaches the blood stream within 30 minutes and peaks after 2-3 hours after injection. Its systemic effect on the body lasts for another 2 to 6 hours. Intermediate-acting insulin, on the other hand, is released 2 to 4 hours after adminis Continue reading >>

Insulin Use In Pregnancy: An Update

Insulin Use In Pregnancy: An Update

As of June 2015 in the United States, 2.7% of women who are 18–44 years of age have a diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes (1). About 5% of all diagnosed diabetes is type 1 diabetes, and 90–95% is type 2 diabetes. It is projected that, by 2050, one in three people will have some type of diabetes. An estimated 5,000 new cases of type 2 diabetes will be diagnosed annually in American children <20 years of age (2). Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) could affect up to 8.7% of all pregnancies in the United States (3). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that these numbers are still on the rise (2). As the age of diabetes diagnosis decreases in U.S. youth, the prevalence of pregestational diabetes is likely to increase in the pregnant population. Maternal diabetes causes complications in the embryo/fetus that start in the uterus, are present immediately after birth, and could potentially last a lifetime. Women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes diagnosed before or during the first trimester of pregnancy are at the greatest risk for fetal congenital anomalies and spontaneous abortions. This risk is associated with both frequent and severe hyperglycemia before conception and during organogenesis (5–8 weeks after the last menstrual period) (4,5). The more severe the maternal hyperglycemia, the greater is the risk for fetal abnormalities. Structural anomalies are a common result, with ∼37% of these affecting the cardiovascular system, 20% affecting the central nervous system, and 14% affecting the urogenital system (6). GDM develops and is diagnosed later in pregnancy, at 24–28 weeks’ gestation, when impaired glucose tolerance is detectable. Therefore, women with GDM are most likely euglycemic during organogenesis and have a decreased risk Continue reading >>

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