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Humalog Lantus

Lantus Versus Humalog Mix As Add-on Therapy In Type Diabetes Patients Failing Sulfonylurea And Metformin Combination Treatment

Lantus Versus Humalog Mix As Add-on Therapy In Type Diabetes Patients Failing Sulfonylurea And Metformin Combination Treatment

Study Primary Objectives: To compare glycemic control, as measured by hemoglobin A1c (A1C), between insulin glargine and 75% insulin lispro protamine suspension/25% insulin lispro as add-on therapies in subjects who failed oral combination therapy with sulfonylurea and metformin. Study Secondary Objectives : To compare the following measures between subjects receiving insulin glargine or 75% insulin lispro protamine suspension/25% insulin lispro: Incidence of hypoglycemia Change in weight Change in serum lipid profile Percentage of subjects achieving A1C levels ≤7% The planned duration of enrollment is 6 months. The study consists of 2 weeks screening phase and a study period that was planned to be 24 weeks. Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 212 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Lantus® (Insulin Glargine[rDNA Origin] Injection) vs Humalog® Mix 75/25 (75% Insulin Lispro Protamine Suspension and 25% Insulin Lispro Injection) as add-on Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients Failing Sulfonylurea and Glucophage (Metformin) Combination Treatment: a Randomized, Open, Parallel Study Study Start Date : July 2001 Primary Completion Date : December 2002 Study Completion Date : December 2002 Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Insulin glargine Lantus (insulin glargine) administered subcutaneously 15 minutes before the evening meal for 24 weeks. The initial dosage was 10 units /day for 7 days. This was followed by titration every 7 days by increasing the dosage until control was established. Insulin dosages were increased according to a subject's glucose values determined by Self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG). The starting dosage of m Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

Glargine And Lispro

Glargine And Lispro

Two cases of mistaken identity Insulin glargine (Lantus; Aventis, Parsippany, NJ) is a recently available basal insulin analog that appears to have a more consistent activity profile than comparable long-acting insulin products (1). It is typically administered as a single injection before bedtime. Due to minor modification of the amino acid sequence in both the A- and B-chains of the insulin molecule, glargine is soluble only in an acidic pH (2). When injected, glargine precipitates in the neutral pH of subcutaneous tissues, prolonging its systemic absorption (2). Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with NPH insulin, glargine improves fasting glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes (3) and results in less nocturnal hypoglycemia in patients with both type 1 (4) and type 2 (5) diabetes. It may be particularly useful in individuals who demonstrate labile blood glucose control with conventional insulin formulations. One immediately obvious difference between glargine and other long- (or intermediate-) acting insulins is that the product is a clear solution, similar to short-acting products, not a semi-opaque suspension. To avoid confusion with such insulins, Lantus is marketed in a vial of unique shape, taller and thinner than all other insulin vials, and the label contains purple print. We herein report, however, our recent experience with two patients who mistakenly administered a rapid-acting insulin analog in lieu of their usual glargine dose. The first patient is a 25-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes duration of 6 years. She had generally been under good control, with a recent HbA1c of 7.0% (normal range 4.3–6.4%). There was no history of diabetes-related complications, including retinopathy or other medical conditions, and her compliance had always Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Humalog (insulin Lispro)

High-alert Medications - Humalog (insulin Lispro)

Extra care is needed because Humalog is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Humalog When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Humalog is a rapid-acting form of insulin that should be injected below the skin within 15 minutes before or immediately after a meal. Have food ready before injection. After injecting the insulin, do not skip a meal or delay eating. 2. Prepare your insulin. An intermediate- or long-acting insulin is often prescribed with Humalog. Humalog can be mixed with insulin NPH (intermediate-acting insulin), but always draw Humalog into the syringe first. Never mix Humalog with Lantus. Do not mix Humalog with other insulins if using an insulin pen or external pump. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, special sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. If you use more than one type of insulin, make each vial or pen look different by putting a rubber band around one type of insulin. 6. Check your medicine. Humalog can be confused with NovoLog or Humulin (other insulins). When you pick up your insulin at the ph Continue reading >>

Difference Between Lantus & Humalog

Difference Between Lantus & Humalog

Lantus and Humalog are two different insulin medications that serve a similar purpose. Lantus slowly releases to regulate low levels of insulin while Humalog is a supplemental insulin taken with a meal to control a carbohydrate spike in diabetics. Control Adults with type 2 diabetes and some children with type 1 diabetes require constant dosing of insulin to control sugar levels in the bloodstream. Lantus is intended to give users a 24-hour period of control, whereas Humalog is used to fill in the gaps, and effects diminish in the first hour. Dose Dosing for Lantus and Humalog is personalized to accommodate the blood sugar range of the individual. Both are taken by injection, with Lantus on a once a day schedule and Humalog taken at meals or as needed. Side Effects Humalog and Lantus have similar side effects that may include irritation at or around the injection site, and dangerously low blood sugar levels, also called hypoglycemia. Diabetics should consult with a medical professional if any serious side effects or allergic reactions persist. Absorption The insulin in Lantus is slowly absorbed by the body in a steady stream over a 24-hour period, with the patient feeling little or no reaction. Humalog, on the other hand, is quickly absorbed with results being felt within the first fifteen minutes after taking, depending on doseage and body mass. Timing Lantus is taken once a day, usually in the morning, and left at home. Humalog is taken to supplement the release of insulin coming from a daily Lantus shot. Humalog is taken on a much more flexible, as-needed basis, as dictated by your day's schedule and mealtimes. Continue reading >>

Adocia Builds Case For Lantus-humalog Combo With Positive Phase Ib Data

Adocia Builds Case For Lantus-humalog Combo With Positive Phase Ib Data

Adocia builds case for Lantus-Humalog combo with positive Phase Ib data Adocia (EPA:ADOC) has taken a step toward a planned Phase III trial of its combination of Eli Lilly's ($LLY) Humalog and Sanofi's ($SNY) Lantus. The latest hurdle to be cleared was a Phase Ib trial, in which Adocia's BioChaperone Combo triggered significantly bigger post-meal drops in blood glucose than Humalog alone. Lyon, France-based Adocia tested the combination in a double-blind crossover study that enrolled 28 people with Type 1 diabetes. The blood glucose levels of participants in the BioChaperone Combo arm fell by a greater amount in the two hours after eating than for the subjects who took Humalog, a result that meant the study met its primary endpoint. Publication of the data follows the release of positive results from an earlier study that looked at the effect of BioChaperone Combo over 30 hours. And with a Phase IIa dose-exposure study ongoing, the data behind the drug are poised to grow further. More data on the combination drug are due before the end of the year, at which time Jefferies analyst Peter Welford thinks talks about a partnership for the product may intensify. Adocia has already struck a $570 million (520 million) deal with Lilly for another of its assets, but for now it has full ownership of BioChaperone Combo. Management says it is comfortable with that situation. "There is no hurry to sign a partnership," Adocia CEO Gerard Soula told Les Echos. Adocia is sitting on around 70 million but has a Phase III diabetes trial looming into view. "We are preparing the launch of the Phase III clinical trial by the end of 2016 or early 2017," Soula said. Late-phase diabetes trials typically carry hefty price tags and a significant global footprint, traits that suggest a Big Pharma p Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs Humalog Dosage Formula??

Lantus Vs Humalog Dosage Formula??

Does anyone know a formula for amount of Lantus needed for a basal dose vs how many units fast-acting you take per carb?I have major swings.Yesterday was told by a nurse that the Lantus I take is really low compared to amount of Humalog I take, but she never told me HOW much she thought I should be taking. I take 1.5 u Humalog per carb for all meals (for last 3 weeks - has changed many times).I'm supposed to take 11 u Lantus in am.My morning BS is usually 300-500.I think the Lantus is not lasting 24 hours.If I try to split the dose, I'm wondering if I need to just take 5 and 6, or if I need to up the overall dose. Any anecdotal info on how much Lantus you have to take daily? I usually have lows or good BS at bedtime.Then, BS goes up VERY HIGH every morning. I'm 40, Type 1, diagnosed 1990, one Lantus shot per day, Humalog for meals, with sliding scale adjustment for high (which I have to use EVERY DAY).Last A1C was 8.5, which was the best in about 3 years.Blood sugars very bad, lows in 20-25 range, highs up to 500-600.See nurse practitioner at endocrinologist's office.She doesn't know how to help me, so is passing me off to a diabetes center.I feel like I need to adjust my own insulin, because I'm not getting a lot of help.Very discouraged.And depressed.BS not helping.I'm thinking this is all up to me, because I'm not getting anywhere with "professional" help.Any experience with amount Lantus vs amount Humalog?? Hi TN!None of us are medical professionals and therefore cannot recommend dosage corrections.We can, however, share our type 1 experiences based on our own life experiences in dealing with type 1 diabetes.My daughter is currently on the insulin pump and only goes on Lantus/Humalog when her pump is malfunctioning.Thankfully (for us), this hasn't happened in so lo Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs. Humalog

Lantus Vs. Humalog

font size A A A 1 2 3 Next Are Lantus and Humalog the Same Thing? Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) and Humalog (insulin lispro [rDNA origin]) are both forms of insulin used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. A difference is that Humalog is usually given together with another long-acting insulin. Humalog is also used together with oral medications to treat type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults. What Are Possible Side Effects of Lantus? The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. What Are Possible Side Effects of Humalog? Common side effects of Humalog include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation). Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), is the most common side effect of insulin lispro such as Humalog. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusions, or seizure (convulsions). Low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia). Symptoms include dry mouth, increased thirst, increased urination, uneven heartbeats, muscle pain or weakness, leg pain or discomfort, or confusion What is Lantus? Lantus is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 Continue reading >>

Newbie Q: Lantus & Humalog Taken Close Together

Newbie Q: Lantus & Humalog Taken Close Together

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » Newbie Q: Lantus & Humalog taken close together Recently diagnosed and started injecting about ten days ago. The nurse told me to take the slow release Lantus Solostar at 2pm and the fast acting Humalog pen three times per day with meals. I opted to take the Lantus at 3pm to give a little bit of breathing space from lunch time. I travel a lot and I am finding that due to work and various other reasons my lunch time seems to be falling later and later around 2pm-3pm. My question is does this matter? If I take both injections close together? Obviously I will discuss this with the nurse next time I get the opportunity but does anybody have an opinion on the best time to take the slow release insulin? I was thinking maybe before bed. At the moment I am only getting consistently good BG readings post breakfast before lunch. With lantus you should try and keep the doses 24 hours apart although there's is some flexibility and an hour either way shouldn't make that much difference, but you can take it morning, afternoon or late evening. I use to take mine before bed but moved it back to ealier in the evening (6-7pm), if you do inject both insulin around the same time just be sure to use different injection sites and don't get the pens (and doses) mixed up, as ever your DSN will explain all if you ask. I've taken Lantus and NovoRapid at the same time many times and never had a problem, probably good to inject into different areas though. Not sure why your nurse suggested injecting your Lantus at 2pm. That's very inconvenient. I inject mine before bed every night - helps to get into a good routine and I can leave the pen by my bed for convenience rather Continue reading >>

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Insulin Basics | Diabetesnet.com

Insulin Basics | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:14 -- Richard Morris Store insulin you are not using in a refrigerator. It is a protein dissolved in water, sort of like a soup stock, so keep it cold to prevent it from spoiling. Keep it between 36º and 46º F. If it gets colder it will freeze. If the insulin freezes, when it thaws it will separate and clump and will no longer be usable. If it gets warmer it will be ok for awhile but will eventually spoil. If it starts to spoil, bacteria growing in it breaks down the insulin. It won't hurt you to use this. However, its not as effective so your blood sugar will be higher than you expect even though you took the right amount of insulin at the right time. It is ok to keep a bottle of insulin you are using at room temperature for up to 28 days (room temperature is 59º to 86º F). The preservative in insulin keeps it from spoiling this long. Insulin at room temperature injected into the skin is more comfortable for many people. Also, it may be easier to get rid of air bubbles in the syringe when it is at room temperature. If you live in a hot climate and your room temperature is above 80º, keep your insulin in the refrigerator. Insulin in a pen can only be kept at room temperature for 2 weeks before it begins to spoil. Check with your pharmacist, the package insert or the manufacturer's websites. Insulin used past 28 days at room temperature or past the expiration date on the box may still be good. However, using it may cause control problems and is not recommended. Lantus, Humalog and Novolog seem to spoil faster than Regular and NPH. If you can't afford to buy insulin and insurance does not cover it, you may be able to get it free. Check the website www.helpingpatients.org or call 202-835-3400. The doctor who prescribes your insulin can help you g Continue reading >>

I Am Type Taking Lantus And Humalog | Diabetic Connect

I Am Type Taking Lantus And Humalog | Diabetic Connect

Also, the omnipod is what I was most interested in! How is it?! What do you like and dislike about it? Its the wireless one, right? Well I have been using the Omnipod system for about a year now. Obviously the main difference between it and other pumps is that it is tubeless. I have not used a tubed pump so I can't really compare them but I do enjoy being able to place the pods at locations other than my waist line (arms, thighs, I have even tried the calf). The packaging is very nice by this I mean the pods that you replace all come packaged with their own syringe so you don't have to buy them separate. They come in boxes of 10. Since you replace them every 3 days or so that would be 1 box per month. I suggest purchasing an extra box or two to keep on hand in case you get a faulty pod or bad infusion (this is rare but has happened). The case for the PDM/Glucose meter has a slot for an insulin bottle and even extra AAA batteries which I find useful. The PDM has the glucose meter built in (it uses Freestyle test strips) so you do not need to use a separate meter or transfer your numbers. Pretty much all the math and calculations are done for you by the PDM. Replacing the Pods is pretty easy and fairly quick. You do not have to insert the infusion by hand or anything it is all automatic. It asks you to check the infusion site but I find this pretty much impossible to see. They were suppose to be coming out with newer thinner pods that had a blue cannula that is easier to see but so far it has not passed FDA approval. Now the few things I do not like about the system: -there is no volume control for the alerts (this is to remind you to change the pod) -if a pod's infusion site does get messed up you pretty much have to replace the entire pod sometimes you can salvage the Continue reading >>

Lantus & Humalog - Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Lantus & Humalog - Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Can I take my Lantus at the same time as my humalog? Which one should i take first? I try to take my Lantus everyday at the same time but i work shift work. How should i do my injections? Yes you can take them at the same time, but not in the same syringe or the same exact injection site. You would usually take the Humalog a little before (or same time) as eating carbs/meals, and/or to correct a high bg. Lantus is usually taken either in the morning or at bedtime (and sometimes split into 2 doses per day). I think I scanned another post about you taking Lantus already, but just getting the Humalog, correct? Do you have a ratio for how much Humalog to take for a certain amount of carbs? (example 1 unit for 15 carbs). And a ratio for how much Humalog to take to lower a high bg? (example 1 unit lowers bg 50 points). I have just taken my first dose of novolog (what is the difference between humolog and novolog by the way?) I was @ 120 mg/dl before I ate Cereal and Milk(usually makes me about 225 post prandial) and some pringles. 30 min after first bite I was at 170 mg/dl, 1hr after first bite I was 90 mg/dl , 67 mg/dl 1hr 40 min after first bite... bout to eat something so i dont get too low Most people say they are the same. But I found Novolog to be quicker and stronger than Humalog. It looks like you are finding the same thing. Well I just ate some meatloaf, mash potatoes, mixed vegies, cucumber and a cup of ice cream... no rapid insulin. I will see where that gets me. How long does the rapid stuff stay in the body, when does it peak? Generally speaking, most of it is finished in three hours, Continue reading >>

Lantus And Humalog Regimen And Questions

Lantus And Humalog Regimen And Questions

I've been reading many of these discussion boards for a while now, as I have taken myself off my pump at New Years, mainly due to being in the hospital for open heart surgery 12/30/15 where they took me off the pump, as it was easier for them to regulate me with traditional injections. I have been a T1 since 1965, and had been on the pump for the last 12 years. I hated having the pump attached to me 24/7, so now I am back to needles and injections. After my initial recovery, my insulin amounts have dropped. I was originally taking 24 units Lantus before bed. Now, 4 months later, I am taking 7 units with no snack, and relatively stable overnight readings. I also suffer from the oft-discussed morning hyperglycemia. When I was on the pump, I had the basal increased from 6am to 8am to deal with that. So here is my dilemma. Going to bed with a more or less normal reading, at 8 units or above before bed, I can drop very low overnight, as in more than 100 points, and awake very low, as in <50. At 7 units before bed, and no snack, my number is as stable as I can get it between bed and wake-up. But at that 7 units Lantus before bed, by 10am I am very high, as in over 200 because of the morning hyperglycemia. I am also on Humalog before meals, on a somewhat sliding scale. Im at 6:1 with breakfast, and then it varies from there because I dont know how active Im going to be from one minute to the next (I am a teacher), and I seem to be very sensitive to changes in everything, including food, activity, illness, and stress. So here are my choices. Stay on the 7 units Lantus overnight, and continue to jack up my Humalog with meals until I am stable. Or increase the Lantus, and have a mandated snack before bed whether I want it or not. The increased Lantus will carry over throughout t Continue reading >>

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